The Dutch - Netherlands

The Dutch,
Haarweg 3,
4212 KJ Spijk Gem Lingewaal,
The Netherlands


  • + 31 (0) 88 33 99 120

  • David Burnside

  • Colin Montgomerie with Ross McMurray of European Golf Design

  • TBC

In 1996, four good friends and golf professionals (who lived in The Netherlands), sat in front of a warm fire at Loch Lomond and formed a golf company called Made in Scotland that aspired to improve the game they loved in the Netherlands. This humble beginning would later lead to the expansion of their company along with the realization of their dream to create a world-class golf experience that would compete with the top golf courses in Continental Europe.

Made in Scotland worked together with Colin Montgomerie and Ross McMurray of European Golf Design (which is a joint venture between IMG and the European Tour) to create a course that would live up to the high standards necessary to host European Tour events. On the 14th of May 2011, The Dutch officially opened and was then put forward in the country’s bid to host the 2018 Ryder Cup. Unfortunately for the Netherlands, France won the Ryder Cup bid, but the infrastructure and facilities developed at The Dutch remain a lasting legacy and are pitched at a level capable of all the demands required to host any large-scale professional golf event.

The Dutch also represents a completely different kind of golf experience to anything that previously existed in the Netherlands. The level of service and the quality of facilities, from the practice facilities to the meeting rooms and locker rooms are second to none. The club was formed as a place where business meets golf, where companies pamper clients and build relations in a very special environment. The Dutch is a rare treat for the lucky members and their invited guests.

Styled in the fashion of an inland links, The Dutch features links-like bunkering, undulating green complexes and diverse, burn-like water hazards. The entire facility is set up for the hosting of European Tour events, at least the main Netherlands stop... the KLM Open is likely to end up here at some point. The Dutch is really the only venue in the Netherlands that has the perfect facilities, space and infrastructure to easily and logistically host these events, which makes perfect sense given the club was a potential Ryder Cup venue and was designed as such.

In 2016 The Dutch was duly rewarded as host venue for the KLM Open, which historically has always been contested on a classic links or heathland course.Home favourite Joost Luiten won the event, becoming the first Dutchman to win his national Open twice.

There is always a “but” and in this case the “but” is that The Dutch is very private, extremely private even for the standards of the Netherlands as it's the only course in the country that will not accept green fee players at any time. Therefore, even if you are coming from overseas and call ahead or write in advance, you won’t get a game unless you know a member or have a corporate contact. However, wait a while and that stance might well change in these economically tough times.
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Reviews for The Dutch

Av. Reviewers Score:
Description: Opened for members play in May 2011 and known simply as “The Dutch”, this new Colin Montgomerie inland links-styled golf course was at the heart of Holland’s bid to host the 2018 Ryder Cup. Rating: 5 out of 6

I played here in 2014 and had high expectations after the reviews here and after seeing the course via the excellent club app. Unfortunately, I have rarely been more disappointed in a course than the Dutch. The facilities are superb and the locker rooms very luxurious but once out on the course it is a big letdown. Plonked in a couple of flat fields between Amsterdam and Rotterdam the layout is largely dull - apart from a three holes (2nd, 3rd, 12th) the rest run along the compass lines with only the shape of water / occasional mounding to break it up. With few interesting doglegs, elevation changes or strategic holes I struggle to understand how this course is so highly ranked. The International - also a modern course is far more interesting and enjoyable.
January 13, 2016


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Response
David
January 13, 2016
Thanks for your review. Just out of curiosity have you ever played any of the courses rated higher than The Dutch in The Netherlands?
This course is among the top 3 in the Netherlands, but the unusual quality of the locker rooms, other facilities and service make a day at the dutch the number 1 golf experience in the Netherlands. The back nine are as challenging as you can look for. Look back from the green at the 17th, it's just braw!
March 12, 2012


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A day at the Dutch is really a unique experience, which up until now has not been equaled in the Netherlands. It all starts when you drive up to the manned entrance house and gate. Here you are immediately met by a gentleman with a smile on his face and clipboard in hand, something that rarely happens in Holland unless there is a police officer issuing a speeding ticket or a utilities company meter reader knocking on your door to penalize you for excessive use of lighting during the dark winters. This gentleman welcomes you and checks you off the guest list. As you drive down the approach to the beautiful clubhouse, the very best practice facilities in the Netherlands appear to your right and you sense a great day is in store. Two young men meet you and welcome you, asking you to leave your clubs in the car and just take your clothes into the clubhouse. They inform you that when you are ready your clubs will be waiting at the practice facility. This is a rather unique level of service in golf and reminiscent of some very special places… Whistling Straits, Bandon Dunes, Shoreacres and Loch Lomond spring to mind.

The Dutch - click to read the full reviewAs you make your way into the clubhouse it is evident that an enormous amount of attention has been paid to the fine details here at the Dutch. On top of that it’s clear that no expense has been spared with the furnishings from the quaint whiskey and cigar room, equipped with private lockers for the members, to the cozy meeting rooms, Board Room and library. Various paintings, maps and old golf collectibles decorate the walls, many with the purpose of drawing as many parallels as possible between the Netherlands and Scotland – arguably the two homes of golf.

Of all the features the clubhouse has to offer, the men’s dressing room is unquestionably the most memorable as it’s one of only a few in the world that has a fully equipped bar taking your orders and offering drinks upon entrance. With lounging chairs all around and flat screen TV’s in abundance, a trip to the men’s room takes on new meaning here at the Dutch. It provides the perfect setting to tempt your opponent into a few pre-round drinks to establish that ever so important competitive edge.

The Dutch - Driving range - click to read the full storyThe practice range is where I could easily spend my day. First of all, it’s one of the few in the Netherlands where you can practice from real turf instead of mats. The balls are stacked and waiting, both at the chipping and pitching range as well as the driving range. As always, a trip to the first tee is not complete without a stop at the putting green. At the Dutch, this is an absolute must and it will shock most golfers because the greens are incredibly fast and very undulating. In my opinion, The Dutch is the only course in the Netherlands with world-class green complexes and I was personally thrilled with them. I honestly didn’t think that any club in club in Holland would build greens as good as these – if anyone gets the chance to play this course, I’d highly recommend paying very close attention to their features. I think greens are an essential element that separates good and world-class courses. It’s also one reason why there are only a couple of courses in Continental Europe that ever make the World Top 100. Review by David Davis (Top 100 Benelux correspondent) - click here to read the full story.
December 03, 2011


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