Hazeltine National - Minnesota - USA

Hazeltine National Golf Club,
1900 Hazeltine Blvd,
Chaska,
Minnesota (MN) 55318,
USA


  • + 1 (0) 612 448 4500

  • Ruth Glaser

  • Robert Trent Jones and Rees Jones

  • Chandler Withington


Hazeltine National played host to the 2016 Ryder Cup matches between the USA and Europe. Team Captains were Davis Love III (US) and Darren Clarke (Europe). The US team came out of the starting blocks at light speed in the Friday foursomes with a 4 - 0 whitewash, but Europe rallied in the afternoon four-ball matches to trail by 5 points to 3. Saturday’s foursomes went Europe’s way but the US won three of the four four-ball matches in the afternoon to lead 9½-6½. For a brief moment, Europe looked set for a Medinah-style comeback when they led in seven of Sunday's 12 singles matches, but another inspired performance by talisman Patrick Reed, who defeated Rory McIlroy in a thrilling battle, paved the way for the first of seven US singles’ wins. All twelve US team members delivered a point while four Europeans drew blanks, but ultimately it was superior putting that enabled the US to regain the trophy. USA 17 - Europe 11. The Ryder Cup was played at Gleneagles in 2014 and will be played at Golf National in 2018.

Former USGA president Totton P. Heffelfinger founded Hazeltine National Golf Club in the early 1960s and Robert Trent Jones was commissioned to design a high quality course for the Midwest capable of holding a national championship. Hazeltine opened for play in 1962 and only eight years later the club hosted the 1970 US Open. In cold windy conditions Englishman and reigning British Open champion Tony Jacklin triumphed easily.

Hazeltine National was modified by Rees Jones (son of RTJ) ahead of the 1991 US Open which turned into a historic battle between Scott Simpson and Payne Stewart. The championship went to a play-off the next day and Payne Stewart came from behind to win his first US Open title.

The PGA Championship was hosted at Hazeltine in 2002 and it was one of the most memorable events in the history of the PGA. On the par five 15th hole during the final round Tiger Woods launched a charge, posting the first of four closing birdies. Rich Beem held off the rampaging Tiger to claim his first Major, winning by a single shot, but Tiger’s charge constituted perhaps the most exciting finish in PGA Championship history.

The 2009 PGA Championship returned to Hazeltine National and it was a tournament that the whole world expected Tiger Woods to win with ease. Woods had not won a major in 2009 and the world No.1 had a four-shot cushion at the halfway stage. Eight times Woods has led a major at halfway and eight times he has gone on to win. Woods lead had been cut to two shots from South Korea’s Yang Yong-Eun after day three. Against all odds, the South Korean easily outplayed Tiger Woods in the final round winning by three clear shots becoming the first Asian-born male winner of a major championship.

Hazeltine’s signature hole is the 16th, a 396-yard par four that requires skill and nerve. Lake Hazeltine guards the left hand side of the hole and a creek lurks menacingly to the right whilst the distant green beckons perched on a jutting peninsula that is surrounded by water.

Hazeltine National Golf Club was once more in the spotlight when the club played host to the thrilling 2016 Ryder Cup.

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Reviews for Hazeltine National

Av. Reviewers Score:
Description: Hazeltine National Golf Club was modified by Rees Jones (son of RTJ) ahead of the 1991 US Open which turned into a historic battle between Scott Simpson and Payne Stewart. Rating: 4.5 out of 6

I was able to,play Hazeltine National several years ago. I found the course difficult and challenging but there not a lot of distinctiveness to the holes. I agree that 10 and 16 are two of the best and most memorable holes ones the course. You get the sense that the course is favored as a major championship venue not so much by it's quality but due to the fact that it sits on a massive expanse of land that can accommodate the extra curricular activities that a major championship demands.

Richard Smith, Knoxville Tennessee

October 12, 2017


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I have both played and covered all of the key events hosted by the club since the 1991 US Open and most recently with the '16 Ryder Cup Matches. Hazeltine is a testing layout but from a pure architectural side of the equation is fairly mundane. The layout has been fortified since its inception as a Robert Trent Jones, Sr. layout. Rees Jones touched up the course considerably and while the course is not contrived it just simply fails to inspire when there.

There are instances when it does very well -- I am a big fan of the downhill par-4 10th with Lake Hazeltine in the background. The most noted hole -- the dangerous par-4 16th -- is one of the best holes Rees has ever created. There's plenty of risk/reward and having the green protrude deeper into the Lake makes for a thrilling adventure indeed.

Hazeltine has been lengthened considerably to deal with the onslaught of talent from the world's best players but the richness in architectural detail is lacking more often than not.

The 9th and 18th holes were flipped for the Ryder Cup Matches but candidly the holes offer nearly the same in terms of shotmaking requirements. The footprint for the facility is more than sufficient to be a continued host for big time events and the turnout from the local folks in Minnesota has always been super supportive.

Hazeltine has certainly come a long ways from its first foray into the main frame of world golf when hosting the 1970 US Open -- won by Englishman Tony Jacklin and panned by a number of American professionals -- notably Dave Hill. Hazeltine fills the checklist for the key ingredients needed when hosting big time events but the feelings engendered are more aligned with a wink and nod and far from a genuine embrace encapsulating rapture.

by M. James Ward

October 12, 2017


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Played the course in May, prior to the Ryder Cup. Could certainly tell that they were growing the course out in certain areas. Wasn't in the best of shape, but the layout is truly challenging and very entertaining. Playing the course at a shorter length took some of the fun out of the layout - I'd suggest teeing it up a little farther back at the detriment of your own score to see the full course.

October 11, 2016


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Hazeltine and Interlachen are the two Minnesota courses on the Top 100. I have played both several times, and somehow I don’t think about them as courses on my quest, but they are no less important than the others I’ve played.

Hazeltine is certainly the best known of the two. Named for the lake on which it sits, the course was founded in 1962 by Totton Heffelfinger, whose ultimate goal was to host a national championship in Minnesota. The course was designed by Robert Trent Jones, Sr., and hosted a U.S. Open in 1970, which brought it plenty of negative press when competitors such as Dave Hill said, “The only thing that Hazeltine is missing is 80 acres of corn and a few cows.”

Hazeltine is a golf-only club – no tennis, no swimming pool. Every hole is a strong test of golf. I have played it several times and have several friends who are members. My favorite holes are the holes in which water comes into play. Number 7 is a par 5 with a pond fronting the green. Number 8, is a beautiful par 3 with water on both the front and right side of the green. The 10th and 16th greens jut out into Lake Hazeltine. Number 10 is a severe dogleg left that tumbles down the hill to a green that sits on the lake. Number 16 is the signature hole, formerly a par 3, now converted to a par 4, with the green sitting on its own peninsula on Lake Hazeltine. Larry Berle.
October 08, 2014


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Keith Baxter
October 08, 2014
The above review is an edited extract from A Golfer’s Dream, which has been reproduced with the author’s kind permission. A Golfer’s Dream, by Larry Berle, tells the story of how a regular guy conquered America’s Top 100 Golf Courses (following Golf Digest’s 2001/2002 list). Larry has exclusively rated for us every course in the hundred, using our golf ball rating system. However, Larry did not rate the 100 courses against every golf course he has played, but instead he rated them in relation to each other within the hundred. Consequently, in some cases, his rating may seem rather low. A Golfer’s Dream is available in Kindle format and also on Kindle Unlimited via Amazon... click the link for more. 
This was a welcomed return to this major venue. The first time I visited Hazeltine, the new clubhouse was just a foundation and a history of course modifications seemed to disrupt the layout from ever having a chance to settle down. I remember thinking “will they ever leave this place alone?” Rest assured, Hazeltine has a new clubhouse, a new club logo (the walking man) and a mighty golf course which is ready for the 2016 Ryder Cup. They continue to be vigilant over course irrigation subsequent to a very hot mid-west summer which has left its mark on the course. A notable improvement/observation that remains at Hazeltine is the sand in the bunkers. The sands texture, colour and consistency throughout the course differ greatly and it has the attention of the club officers. The sand is sometimes an unattractive feature, which is interesting as the place isn’t short on “I really don’t want to go in there” bunkers. Some of the bunkers hold more water than others and the ball doesn’t always fall to the base of the trap, as my playing partner discovered on the treacherous par 3 17th. Stand out holes include the superb 10th which plays a tee shot to a guarded plateau followed by a down-hill dogleg, and the seriously demanding 9th and 18th holes which bring you back up to the clubhouse and offer memories of PGA champions hitting miracle shots from the depths of danger. This club is made for big events and has so much land which will be effectively used for hospitality during tournaments. With a double-ended range and excellent short-game options, a day at Hazeltine is a day to worship.
October 08, 2012


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Hazeltine has to be one of the toughest courses in the country and Minnesotas best. Bunkers, bunkers, bunkers and with three monster 600 yarders and more than 7400 yds from the tips its long. 10 and 16 are my favorites and apparently 16 was Payne Stewarts favorite hole in all golf. This has to be RTJs finest course and personally I’m not one of his fans but this is not tricked up and as a layout its something else. Bring your best game and hope to avoid the traps otherwise you get eaten alive. Fantastic
January 31, 2007


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Somebody
January 31, 2007
Already hosted a PGA championship which in my opinion waas one of the best. Also, will host the PGA Championship again in 2009 and the Ryder Cup in 2012. Beautiful setting on Lake Hazeltine with some magnificent holes bordering it (#16).
A friend
August 18, 2009
Best couse in the world