The Belfry (Brabazon) - Warwickshire - England

The Belfry,
Wishaw,
North Warwickshire,
B76 9PR,
England


  • +44 (0) 1675 470301

  • Golf Club Website

  • 1 mile N of Wishaw

  • Welcome - book in advance - handicap certificate required


The Belfry played host to the 1985 Ryder Cup and was also host in 1989, 1993 and 2002. No other club has staged three Ryder Cups, let alone four, so The Belfry’s Brabazon course has become a Ryder Cup synonym. 1985 was a breakthrough year for Europe when Sam Torrance holed the winning birdie putt. Europe 16 ½ - USA 11 ½. The 1989 Ryder Cup matches were halved and this event heralded the commercial coming of age for the Ryder Cup, which featured the largest tented village ever seen at a sporting event in Britain. Europe 14 - USA 14. 1993 was the year of the US veterans Chip Beck and Raymond Floyd who claimed five points from a possible six. Payne Stewart and Jim Gallacher were also on form for the US. USA 15 - Europe 13. Delayed by the terrorist attacks of 9/11, the 2002 Ryder Cup was decided by a strong European singles performance that was sealed by Paul McGinley’s 8-foot par putt on the 18th, which secured a halve against Jim Furyk. Europe 15 ½ - USA 12 ½. The Ryder Cup was played at PGA National in 1983, Muirfield Village in 1987, Kiawah Island in 1991, Oak Hill in 1995, the Country Club, Brookline in 1999 and Oakland Hills in 2004.

The Brabazon course at The Belfry doesn't need introducing. After all, it's unique. This course has played host to more Ryder Cups than any other course on the planet – four in total. The Americans must dislike it, because team USA has only once triumphed here. Additionally, and for only the second time in Ryder Cup history, the 1989 biennial match was halved, but Europe retained the trophy because they were still the cup holders following their win in 1987 at Muirfield Village, Ohio.

The Belfry itself owes much to the vision and determination of one man, Colin Snape. In the mid 70s, Snape was the director of the financially struggling PGA. Over a pie and a pint, Peter Alliss told him that an old hotel on the outskirts of Birmingham was available as a potential new location for the PGA HQ. In 1977, The Brabazon (named after former PGA president, Lord Brabazon) opened for play with a challenge match, Seve Ballesteros and Johnny Miller against Tony Jacklin and Brian Barnes. The Belfry has never looked back.

Alliss and Thomas were given an unremarkable piece of farmland, which required significant sculpting to turn it into a remarkable golf course. For many visiting golfers, The Belfry (and The Brabazon course, in particular) is Mecca. Everyone wants to play here; it's an exciting golfing venue, drawing thousands of visitors each year.

The excitement comes from playing memorable and familiar holes. And, following Dave Thomas's £2.7m makeover in the late 90s, there is more water on The Brabazon than just about any other inland course in the British Isles – take a few extra balls. The course has two outstanding holes, which have been popularised by television – the 10th and 18th. The former is a unique short par four, measuring about 300 yards, with water running along the right hand side of the fairway. It is driveable – you've seen Seve do it – so go on, go for it.

The 18th is another hole that is totally dominated by water and it's terrifying. This dramatic, par four closing hole, rewards the brave. Cut off as much of the water as you can chew from the tee, and you will be left with a shorter approach shot, which must carry a lake on its way to a long, narrow, triple-tiered green. This hole has seen more Ryder Cup emotion than any other hole in the world. For this reason alone, to follow in the footsteps of golf's greatest legends, The Brabazon is a must-play course. But it's not everyone's cup of tea.

Tom Doak commented as follows in his original Confidential Guide to Golf Courses: “For some reason the designers have tried to bring American design concepts to British soil, but the stylized, Trent Jones-style bunkers and multiple-tiered greens, and an utterly failed attempt to imitate Pete Dye’s telephone poles to line a bunker (it looks like a bunch of Lincoln logs on end in a sandbox), imitate the worst elements possible.” The bunkers have changed since a young Doak penned the above comments and he tempered his words in the latest series of confidential guides. Interestingly, his rating also improved, up from 4 to 5 (out of 10), so maybe the Brabazon is not so bad after all.

If the above article is inaccurate, please let us know by clicking here

Write a review

Reviews for The Belfry (Brabazon)

Average Reviewers Score:
Description: The Brabazon course at The Belfry doesn’t need introducing. This course has played host to more Ryder Cups than any other course on the planet – four in total. Rating: 6.5 out of 10 Reviews: 73
TaylorMade
James Stephens

A nice golf course, but over hyped for me. The 10th and 18th lovely holes but other than that it isn’t better than most parkland courses through the country.

Greens are always in good condition, but fairways can be very heavy with little rain.

September 05, 2021
5 / 10
Reviewer Score:
TaylorMade

Respond to above review
  Was this review helpful?
0 people found this review helpful

Alex Frolish

I think familiarity can be confused with affection when it comes to golf courses as famous as the Brabazon. It is clearly (outside of the Open courses), one of the modern golf’s most iconic courses residing in the British Isles and its association with the Ryder Cup elevates it to bucket list status.

We’ll get the negatives out early however. The land here is not particularly inspiring and although the trees lining the fairways are moderately mature, the course doesn’t blow me over aesthetically. Value for money wise, I think you are paying 50% of the green fee for the Ryder Cup association, the other 50% is for the quality of the course. Design wise, I think the match play nature of the courses layout detracts from the overall flow of the course. You’re in for a slow round as people reload on the various hero shot holes 3/4/6/10/18.

In terms of the course, everybody knows about 10 and 18 and to be honest, those two shots are the ones most will remember. The routing is memorable enough that I can recall it without need for prompting, but that may be helped by having seen it so much on TV. I thought holes 6 and 8 were the strongest holes on the front 9, although 6 in particular could be a true card wrecker with the wrong wind blowing.

Coming home, 10 and 18 book end a run of holes that are largely average with the exception of 16 which I enjoyed. The finishing 4 are set up for a risk reward swashbuckling end to a Ryder cup, which is a feeling it’s difficult not to get caught up in when you play them for the first time.

In summary, you will find quality course conditions, plenty of Ryder cup associated memorabilia and photo opportunities and two holes you won’t forget playing in a hurry. The rest of the course is okay, but no more than that. It’s definitely a course I’m glad to have played but I won’t be hurrying to return.

July 15, 2021
6 / 10
Reviewer Score:
TaylorMade

Respond to above review
  Was this review helpful?
1 person found this review helpful

Jez

You know the saying, opinions are like ... well you get the gist. Everyone has them, and if you're at least semi serious about golf you'd have one on the Belfry. "6 good holes", "hackers paradise" "£175 a round is a joke" blah blah blah. Opinions are not a bad thing however, I'm here giving my two cents to whoever wants to read right now, but you have to do your best to wipe your conscience of it to really give an unbiased view.

The Brabazon course features a vast amount of two or even three tiered greens, making approach shots incredibly important. I would say it's an almost American type style course with big imposing bunkers and the beforementioned tiered greens.

Bearing that in mind, I was actually quite surprised. We'd gone up on the Sunday and played Little Aston. Stayed the night and the Belfry and played the Derby in the morning (probably the worst course I've played) lining up to play the Brabazon in the afternoon. We managed to get off a little early even after asking the poor starter for the inevitable picture next to the sign which he would've most likely done countless times.

The condition despite playing at 3pm was very good, a few of the fairways had been dressed with sand recently but the greens and other fairways were top notch. I started well putting my approach on the first to 5 foot which gave me some much needed confidence! I felt very unlucky on the second when my slightly pulled approach from the fairway landed dead on a sprinkler head, only about 10 feet from the hole and then proceeded to jump the green and give me a far far more difficult up and down! Bogey!

The third is a great hole, bunkers left and right make the tee shot difficult then offering an ultimatum whether to risk the big lake of water short or lay up. I managed to hit the green in two!! Only to find myself a 50 ft putt which I just about managed to scramble a birdie out of. There is water on every hole on the front nine apart from the first, providing a lot of consideration for what you should hit and where.

Some pretty holes follow until you get to the 9th with the green next to the 18th over the same lake. The 10th is what everyone talks about, people staying in the hotel will stand and watch, as did the group behind us as everyone waits for the green to clear on this signature hole. And you can't blame them, most people will never get even close but they've paid their green fee you might as well have a go, see if you can recreate some of the shots you will have seen in the 4, yes 4 Ryder cups this course has hosted.

Everyone has their story on the 10th. We played off yellow tees making the hole only about 230, I hit my 2 iron amazingly, just a tad left causing it to hit the giant mound just left of the green and to then bounce right towards the green, my heart was in my mouth as I watched it then hit the wooden sleeper 7 ft away from the left pin position only to see it then bounce back into the water! Agonisingly close but hey ho! From the dropzone I hit a great flop shot which finished 6 inches short to cap off one of the more eventful pars I'll ever have! The rest of the back nine is lovely as expected, a few holes which people will say are boring or uneventful but it is impossibly hard to create 18 golf holes which leave a mark on you, especially with a parkland course.

The twelfth is worth a mention, a great long par 3 with water short which creeps up towards the right hand side to a sort of paddling rock pool. My tee shot to 5 foot was probably my shot of the day if I had managed to sink the putt!

The 15th and 17th are great par 5's. the former with a giant bunker in the middle of the fairway short of the elevated green leaves a decision for those lucky enough to find the small gap between the trees to the fairway. Whilst 17 requires the bigger hitters to trust themselves and cut the corner off as a hook will leave you chipping out to get there in three (exactly like me!) All that leaves the 18th, someone had told me the day before it's the best closing hole you can play, and I don't think I'll be arguing here. One of the only bonuses for playing a 4 1/2 hour round as a two ball left me to really think about where I need to be, and after consulting google maps I figured I needed to aim well left comfortably over the treeline on the left. I hit the tee shot of the day, it ended in the rough but only with 170 to the green! The yellow tees were placed next to the white blocks (strange) on this hole so I was immensely proud. Only to slightly pull my second and leave myself probably the hardest chip of the year, having to stop it deadweight at the top of the three tiered green to then roll down towards the hole. There's a reason the pros are so good and it's because they can put these within 2 ft. I cannot so I had to settle for bogey!

To sum up.. Everyone has heard of the Belfry, it's held more Ryder Cups than any course and it's hard not to forget that with plaques on the course and even showing you where the team rooms are if you don't get lost looking! The only criticism is the pairings and the time of round. It's annoying to spend almost £200 and to have to be paired with another two ball. We were lucky enough to play without that but I can feel the frustration of those who do. They seem to let anyone with the money play the Brab making it painfully slow, it's part and parcel of it I suppose so I won't hold a grudge. It's a fabulous golf course, in great condition and that's why it attracts thousands of visitors each year. The complex itself is fantastic although incredibly pricy £42 for two burgers and two cokes is a little more than I'm used to paying but you don't come here every day!

July 06, 2021
9 / 10
Reviewer Score:
TaylorMade

Respond to above review
  Was this review helpful?
2 people found this review helpful

Paul Howard

I’ve not played The Belfry’s Brabazon Course in 30 years. I’d returned a few times and had stopped off for a coffee or a bite to eat and had watched enviously as, like a conveyor belt, golfers teed off, hoping to emulate some of golfs greatest moments. For this isn’t just another golf course. This is the home of the Ryder Cup. It’s the place where Seve and Olle tamed the Americans. Where Sam lifted his arms aloft in that red jumper and again lifted the trophy. On every hole a moment of magic has occurred. If you love golf you’ll happily walk round the hotel looking at the hundreds of framed photographs. It’s a shame their isn’t more memorabilia on show. Where is Christys 2 iron now? Sam’s tartan Captains jacket or Nicks Bridgestone golf ball?

Ultimately this is why we all come to play here. It’s also the reason the club gets to charge £175.00 per round. For if it hadn’t held those 4 competitive matches I can’t imagine many of us would want to pay such a fee. We come here to replicate, or at least try to, some of those great shots. Don’t get me wrong the course is great, the greens are world class, the tees flat, the rough is thick and consistent and the fairways are…. Ok.

Having spent some time in front of the hotel on the practice green it was my time to tee off. Sadly I watched as 2 more buggies drove off in front of me. I’d hoped the buggies would have sped the hackers up. I was wrong. Playing from the white tees the first two holes are straight forward pleasant short par 4s. You are reminded on the first tee by the Brabazon 8ft wall that you are playing the Ryder Cup Course. As if you needed reminding. The 3rd is when you find they have water on virtually every hole on the front 9. I thought this was a great matchplay hole. Do you go for it in 2 or lay up? The 4th and 5th are again good holes before you play the terrifying 6th. With a vast lake on your left that plays all the way to the green, bailing out right off the tee only serves in finding more water. I found both.

The first and only par 3 on the front 9, 7th, is where I realised just how tough the rough is around the green. With the flag tucked left I’d made it over the water and bunker but came up just short of the green. I was playing the course just a week after the English Masters and playing a buried ball just a couple of yards from the putting surface reminded me just how great the guys at the top really must be.

The 8th and 9th are just great golf holes. You must hit driver if you hope to land it on either green with water in front of both. Yet on the 8th especially the lake that claimed by ball on the 6th is waiting for another contribution.

After a 2 1/2 hour front 9 I reached the famous 10th. As a huge Seve fan I’d watched him drive it in a Ryder Cup Fourball match. A plaque sits to the side honouring his achievement in the 1978 Hennessy Cup. It was sadly lost on the 8 blokes stood on the tee, each with a beer in their hand from the halfway house. I doubt they’d hit a fairway all day yet here they cheered each other on, to go for the green. Realising my plight and frustration a kind Marshall duly drove me to the 11th and suggested I return after the 18th to play it. For me this is where The Belfry didn’t reach a 5 1/2! For alas it’s a corporate golf course. I wonder how many members they have? How many actual golfers who play their regularly? Sadly it appears if you say “oh I play”, and you pay, they let you on. I imagine this is the hole in which 90% of the worlds lake ball industry makes its money from.

So after the alright 11th I reached the magnificent par 3 12th. 209 yards over water and a stream to the right I was clapped by the next fourball, I caught up, in front of me after my 4 iron to 6ft. I’m sure the shot is what caused them to allow me through. After the unmemorable 13th I again was met by the plaque reminding me that Sir Nick Faldo had aced it in 1993. In a way if makes the course special. I’d have loved to have seen more plaques. The 18th for one needed a ‘Christy hit a 2 iron….’, one. After all the hotel is covered in pictures and signs telling you the rooms that teams used etc, so why not more around the course?

15th is a good par 5 without being anything special and 16 is again another par 4 that on any other course wouldn’t be remembered. The green however is quite deceiving and once on it you’ll find a double tier that takes you lower on the left. I had by this point joined up with another 1-ball who had also grown older playing behind yet another group who didn’t know raking bunkers was a thing.

After not cutting off enough of the dog leg 17th I laid up on the par 5, having to play the 3rd shot from short of the stream with a 5 iron. Again it’s a great matchplay hole. The water on the back 9 is rare compared to its over eager front 9 but it’s strategically placed here and doesn’t punish one to the point of throwing the hole away but merely makes you play into the green from further back.

Then finally I’d reached the 18th (my 17th). From the tee, if you don’t know the hole, you probably won’t know where to aim. The clever golfer will play towards the bunker, lay up then play on for 3. Making a 5 is a good score for a mid handicapper. However, nobody sits in the bar after, telling anyone who’ll listen, how they made a solid bogey on the last! My new playing partner found the bunker (from the yellows) with his 3 wood. Bear in mind he was here alone, so had nobody to relay the story to anyway. I believed just left of the bunker was the line with the driver… at this point I had too much side spin and it landed a good 35 yards left of where I had wanted. I had presumed that was me ‘done’. Yet on making into the clearing my Titleist was indeed sat smiling by the 150 yard marker. I hadn’t intended to take such a tiger line but was rewarded for putting up with waiting on most tees. The second shot to the green sent goosebumps over my arms. On sighting my tee shot I considered doing a ‘Christy’ and thanking God, but thought better of it.

After finding the green and making par on the three tier green, I returned to the relatively, now quiet, 10th hole. Of course I hit two off the tee. A punched 7 iron and wedge brought me a simple par. Bizarrely I also emulated all those idiots by hitting a second with my driver. At just short of 300 yards, into a breeze, I could have predicted the result. Yet this is why we play the Brabazon course. We dream of hitting that one shot that such and such a player hit in 19…something. It’s why a 5 hour round doesn’t feel so bad. For virtually every hole you’ll want to take a picture. You want to have an extra putt on the unbelievably well and perfectly rolling greens. For this is the spiritual home of The Ryder Cup.

June 10, 2021
8 / 10
Reviewer Score:
TaylorMade

Respond to above review
  Was this review helpful?
0 people found this review helpful

Chris Wanless

The excitement of 8 lads heading up the M40 was palpable. We had been set free and we were off to play a course that has hosted more Ryder Cups than any other.

I decided to leave my review a few days, as the excitement of just being back on the golfing road again may have clouded my judgement and my initial thoughts when I walked off the course was “I really enjoyed that”, but how much was down to the joy of playing again and the history of the course and how much of that was the course itself?

I’ll start by saying that Parkland Golf is not a style that I get too excited about. I have played good ones (Hadley Wood), I have played overhyped unremarkable ones (The Grove), but I never walk off thinking “wow I can’t wait to come back”.

The Brabazon measures an amenable 6,729 yards from the Whites and is a flat piece of farmland that has been converted into a golf course made challenging by a shed load of water and some very clever and strategic bunkering. The course is in superb condition and clearly very well maintained, although the greens were remarkably slow.

The front 9 demands accuracy as water comes into play on most holes, requiring a well placed tee shot or accurate approach to avoid the drink. The back 9 is a lot more open and uses bunkering as its key protection, save the last hole, which has both and is one of the best finishing holes I have played in England so far.

There are some very good holes here interspersed by some rather straightforward ones. The 3rd is a pretty Par 5 with the green set behind a big lake. The 9th is risk reward hole where the bolder you are with your tee shot, the shorter your approach, but a large well placed bunker is waiting to swallow any overdrawn drives.

The 10th is everything it’s reputed to be. The signature hole, memories of Seve, the Ryder Cup etc. You have to go for it and we all did and I hit it! A can forever say I drove the 10th. It’s a short hole Par 4, but bunkers swallow anything right and water if you miss left. It’s fantastic.

The remaining holes on the back 9 are ok, (except the 18th) not ones I will remember for years to come and if the course was made up of these, then this wouldn’t break into the Top 100, but the 18th is superb! My bugbear continues to be Top 100 courses with average finishing holes...I could rattle off a list, but the Brabazon saves it’s best till last. An angled tee shot over water onto a narrow fairway, which gets wider the longer you go followed by a long approach over even more water onto a three tiered green. If you walk off the last with a par you’ve done very well and it will settle any matchplay game you have going down the last.

I gather from reading reviews on The Brabazon that it’s a marmite course, but I found myself somewhere in the middle. My God I was pleased to be back out and I loved my day there, but on reflection it’s a good parkland course with a few very good holes, but the course’s reputation is elevated by its history, but it should certainly be on everyone’s hit list, if not just to see if you can hit the 10th...all the best do

For all photos of reviews, please follow Chris’ Instagram page: https://www.instagram.com/top.100.golf/

April 13, 2021
7 / 10
Reviewer Score:
TaylorMade

Respond to above review
  Was this review helpful?
1 person found this review helpful

Thomas

Really good layout and location. Beautiful area and some historic holes. The condition was really good, greens could have run a bit better. All in all a good and fun course to play. I'll be back one day.

April 12, 2021
7 / 10
Reviewer Score:
TaylorMade

Respond to above review
  Was this review helpful?
0 people found this review helpful

Mark

With the return of golf in England started this was the first time I've played for the past three months and what a venue to restart at. Fantastic. Such great condition and facilities, some many memorable holes, probably the most being the tenth were yes we did manage to drive the green like Seve. A must for any golfer who enjoys variety and history of courses in the UK.

March 30, 2021
8 / 10
Reviewer Score:
TaylorMade

Respond to above review
  Was this review helpful?
0 people found this review helpful

Alex

OK how has the Ryder Cup been played here? FOUR TIMES! And currently bidding for a fifth!

The facilities and the whole property is great. ‘World Travel Awards’ England’s Leading Resort Winner 2019 is a fair commendation. I could live in the shop and on the range all day. Three 18-hole layouts. Awesome Mini Golf course. Great bar. Impressive (but corporate) hotel. A nightclub. The list goes on.

But for now we are going to talk about The Brabazon.

A small group of players from the University of the West of England Golf Team got up early and travelled from Bristol, along the M5 north to The Belfry Hotel & Resort. A cold and damp February – granted not the best day to visit. The itinerary was 18-holes on The Brabazon, Dinner and one nights stay.

I can only remember 2 holes from this course and I am sure you can all guess which ones they are. The course is dull. Thank goodness for the rest of the property.

The story goes that the European PGA built a very average course on a farmer’s field and then decided to put the Ryder Cup there to help pay for their costs. They got lucky, in that the Ryder Cup caught fire in the 1980s and as a result no-one really minded the fact that the course awful because they had some dramatic holes and no-one was really doing a golf course architecture examination with the Ryder Cup going on.

All of that started at The Belfry in 1985. The UK host courses before that had been Walton Heath, Royal Lytham, Muirfield and Royal Birkdale – some of the highest rated golf courses in the WORLD. The PGA decided that it was a good idea to take it to a newly opened converted potato field outside Birmingham. As it happens it provided drama, excitement and kick-started a period of dominance for the European team, the likes of which had never been seen before. Lucky them.

Having said that, the 10th and 18th holes must rate as two of the most memorable in English golf. The 10th is the short par 4 which begs you to have a crack at the green. The risk is a creek running in front and to the side and you have a choice whether to go for the green or take a short iron layup and wedge. Most will remember the footage of Jose Maria Olazabal and Seve Ballesteros hitting the green.

We all had fun over this weekend. We played a course that hosted 5 Ryder Cups. Came up close to history. Got merry. But I am in no rush to go back. Sorry if I have burst the Belfry bubble.

October 22, 2020
6 / 10
Reviewer Score:
TaylorMade

Respond to above review
  Was this review helpful?
1 person found this review helpful

Jack Snell

Judging from previous reviews it seems like The Brabazon is somewhat of a marmite course. Without wanting to generalise or make too many assumptions I think it’s fair to say the keen golf course aficionado (less pompous names are available) find the place a bit over-rated, and were it not for it’s Ryder Cup heritage, wouldn’t be held up in such high esteem. And despite not being somebody who’s had the privilege of playing the truly great courses of the world, I can understand this opinion. American style target golf courses are ten a penny across England these days and there’s not too much stuff in terms of course architecture that you won’t find elsewhere.

However, all that to one side, if you take The Belfry for what is unashamedly is, a quality but accessible resort, I think there are very few experiences the average golfer would enjoy more.

Personally I find the course really good fun, especially the front nine. #2, #3, #4, #6, #8 are all really good holes. There’s plenty of challenge off the tee and some really dramatic, nerve-jangling water carries to contend with.

I think the 9th is one of the most underrated holes on the course. A long par 4 that suits a draw off the tee. The closer you dare take it to the fairway bunker, the better angle you have into a severely sloping green that wraps around the back of a lake. Bail out to the right, away from the bunker on your tee shot and you’ll find yourself blocked out by tall trees. Bail out to the left on your approach and you’re pitching out from either a bunker or from downhill lie onto a green below your feet running away from you.

After that it’s number 10 and there’s no dispute as to how good a hole it is. The only downside is you can end up waiting quite a while to tee off as everybody wants to try and drive the green. But who can blame them? You’ve got to give it a go.

To be fair I think the rest of the back 9 is a bit weaker, although I do like the 12th. A long, downhill par 3 over a lake. But other than that it’s a little forgettable (relatively speaking) until you get to #18, to which again, there’s no disputing how good a par 4 it is. If you manage to find the fairway, the approach over the lake towards that enormous three tiered green is iconic.

Overall I think the Belfry is a great day out or weekend away. I think you’d have to be mad to pay the full £160 green fee, but in reality you can get on for much cheaper. Either by booking more last minute when they seem to reduce the prices, (I’ve scored a midweek tee time for as little as £60) or by staying over a night or two and getting on one of their multi course deals.

So in summary, yes, if you’re somebody who really appreciates tradition, great golf architecture and unique golfing experiences, the Belfry isn’t for you. But if you’re looking for a fun golfing getaway with your mates, and a chance to recreate some famous shots on a famous, well maintained course, it won’t disappoint.

October 08, 2020
7 / 10
Reviewer Score:
TaylorMade

Respond to above review
  Was this review helpful?
2 people found this review helpful

Colin Hewitt

As one of the best known courses in the UK, most people have fairly set views of the Brabazon. Having played it a number of years ago I was looking forward to seeing how it has aged. Playing it at the end of September it was much better than I remembered. The greens were quick, true and with some very difficult pin positions. The slope rat8ng for each tee is very high and understandably as there is trouble off every tee and no easy holes. The round took 4 hours 20 minutes which wasn’t bad considering it’s difficulty and not once we’re we held up which was a welcome change.

Beware of the Lake on the left of the 6th as my brother managed to lose his whole trolley, bag and clubs in it!

There are talks of the, bidding for the 2030 Ryder Cup but this would be on a new course made from the current PGA and the Derby as the Brabazon doesn’t have the space for the crowds but it would be great to see it return here.

October 01, 2020
8 / 10
Reviewer Score:
TaylorMade

Respond to above review
  Was this review helpful?
0 people found this review helpful