Cabot Links - Nova Scotia - Canada

Cabot Links,
15933 Central Avenue,
Inverness,
Nova Scotia,
B0E 1N0,
Canada


  • +1 902 258 4653


In 2012, less than five years after Rod Whitman’s critically acclaimed Sagebrush course made its debut in British Columbia, another of his formidable designs was unveiled on the other side of the country in the remote province of Nova Scotia.

Cabot Links is partly located on an old coal mine just outside the small town of Inverness on the rugged west coast of Cape Breton Island and the generously proportioned fairways that now nestle amongst the sand hills overlooking the Gulf of St. Lawrence comprise Canada’s first genuine links layout.

The front nine plays considerably longer than the back nine, largely because the inward half contains four of the five short holes on the scorecard. The tiny 14th is perhaps the most thrilling of these par threes – measuring no more than 102 yards from the back markers – and it plays downhill to an infinity green that’s totally exposed to the elements.

A second course, Cabot Cliffs, was unveiled to the golfing public in 2015 so maybe, in the years to come, Inverness will become the iconic Canadian golfing destination that matches Bandon in the United States. That wouldn’t be too much of a surprise, of course, when you consider that one of the developers here is none other than Mike Keiser.

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Reviews for Cabot Links

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Description: Cabot Links is located just outside the small town of Inverness on the rugged west coast of Cape Breton Island and these fairways, overlooking the Gulf of St Lawrence, comprise Canada’s first genuine links layout. Rating: 9 out of 10 Reviews: 13
TaylorMade
Steve MacQuarrie
The original course in Inverness will take a back seat to Cabot Cliffs when the latter opens next year. But Cabot Links is a fine course in its own right. Rod Whitman has paid homage to the classics with a Biarritz (#2), a Cape (#3), an Alps (#11), a Sahara (#13) and a Short (#14). (The routing was changed in 2015 so these hole numbers may not correspond to those in prior reviews.) The Sahara hole shares an enormous green with #8 in the finest Old Course tradition and the Alps is one of the finest holes I’ve played anywhere. The highly contoured greens are a delightful challenge and the open green fronts allow running shots on almost every hole—a necessity given the firm and often windy conditions. That said, the greens couldn’t break 8 on my stimpmeter the day I played. And while the contours make double digit readings impractical, there’s no reason they couldn’t be cut to the speeds found on other links courses on both sides of the Atlantic. The fairways are a bit ragged, but not much different from what one might find on some of the lesser links course in Scotland or Ireland. The routing felt a bit contrived with long, unintuitive walks to a few tees. These, however, are niggling issues when compared to the overall experience.Among other tandems of modern links courses, I felt the Cabot pair compares favorably to the Whistling Straits duo and is right up there with the pair at Barnbougle, but not quite as enjoyable as any two at Bandon or the Streamsong courses.
August 12, 2015
10 / 10
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Dave Finn
The golf gods ‘blessed’ us with a cool overcast day that was foggy, drizzly and raining – ‘nasty’ weather but we certainly felt like we were ‘on the moors’. We’re near the tiny hamlet of Inverness (Nova Scotia, not Scotland) and are about to play Cabot Links, one man’s vision of “If you build it they will come”. It’s here that owner Ben Cowan-Dewar commissioned architect Rod Whitman to design Canada’s only authentic links course on the site of an old coal mining operation. He responded by rendering a stunning 18-hole par 70 that includes five holes that play directly along the coastline and every other hole has a view of the Gulf of St. Lawrence. In June of 2012 this was the most widely anticipated golf course opening in North America and I can see why. Not only is Cabot Links stunning, it’s challenging. There’s fescue galore and huge greens that average over 45 yards deep and so, they actually allow you to take pull carts on greens. That was a tough thing for me to do but not as tough as negotiating the 4th and 13th which come together to form a double green that is 110 yards wide and where I made my best three putt ever! To read the entire article on golf on Cape Breton Island see http://golftravelandleisure.com/2014/04/14/born-wild-cape-breton-ns/
April 30, 2014
10 / 10
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Fergal O'Leary
With just 12 months of operation under its belt as an 18-hole golf course, Cabot Links has already established itself as Canada’s only authentic links with a breath-taking future ahead of it. Nestled between the rural town of Inverness and the Gulf of St. Lawrence, the golf course offers a magnificent view of the ocean from each hole and certainly gets your heart beating. There is a welcomed sense of convenience and reward at this isolated club. Golfers have everything they need in one spot and with world-class accommodations and cuisine onsite, all you’re literally left to worry about is how many shots you have to give on each side! Ben Cowan Dewar partnered with Mike Keiser and first visited the land in late 2004. Most of the usable links land in the world has been developed and the few remaining pieces of land have been snapped up (e.g.: Castle Stuart and Trump International). During our visit, we had the great fortune of playing the course three times, each of them vastly different from each other. Our first round was in a 35mph wind from the black tees at 6,854 yards, followed by two more rounds from the green tees at 6,455 yards with different wind directions each time. Mother Nature ensures that most shots will be played along the ground, and if you don’t instinctively know how to hit a low stinger, then don’t worry, the links at Inverness will quickly force you to figure it out. The entire golf course is made from fescue grass seed. One impact that this has on such a young course is that the greens are never going to get above 8.5 on the stimp metre (by design). There is so much undulation on the greens, and the slower speeds actually contribute to faster play. Once you convince yourself to hit the putts a little harder than you want to, you’ll appreciate what the architects were doing with the fescue feature. Click the link to read Fergal’s full report on Cabot Links.
July 16, 2013
8 / 10
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