Connemara (Championship) - Galway - Ireland

Connemara Golf Links,
Ballyconneely,
Clifden,
Co. Galway,
Ireland


  • +353 (0) 95 23502

Connemara is located on the rugged, tranquil and unspoilt Atlantic coastline at Ballyconneely, situated on a peninsula, jutting into the Atlantic between Clifden to the north and Roundstone to the south. Ballyconneely is also renowned for its breeding of the world famous Connemara Pony. According to folklore, the breed originated as the result of a Spanish shipwreck. A number of Arab horses swam ashore and ended up breeding with the wild local ponies.

Founded in 1973, and designed by the prolific Irish architect, Eddie Hackett. Connemara is one of the toughest links courses in the world, measuring more than 7,200 yards from the back tees. The course is littered with stern and craggy rocks, further adding to the rough and ready nature of the links. Avoid these rocks at all costs, otherwise you will find yourself playing from some unusual positions. Connemara has 27 holes, the A and B nines comprise the Championship course. The C nine is shorter in length.

The wind is a significant factor at Connemara. There are no sand dunes to provide protection from the elements. In fact, the ground is fairly flat. The upside of this is that there are uninterrupted, spectacular, panoramic views of the coastline with its glorious white sandy beaches and to the north east, the austere Twelve Bens mountain range provide a dramatic backdrop. The outward nine is much shorter and flatter than the inward half. But the back nine possesses the best and most memorable holes. Brace yourself for the challenging 210-yard par three 13th, with its raised green. It’s regarded as Connemara’s signature hole and this is where the lunar landscape kicks in and stays with us for the closing holes.

Connemara is a remote golf course, but everyone here is exceptionally welcoming. The last six holes will remain etched in the mind for a very long time, and if you are brave enough to tackle this brutal course from the back tees – good luck. Pray that the wind machine is turned off.

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Reviews for Connemara (Championship)

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Description: If you are brave enough to tackle the brutal Championship course from Connemara Golf Club's back tees – good luck – pray that the wind machine is turned off. Rating: 7.5 out of 10 Reviews: 17
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Mariano Martinez de Azagra

Connemara is one of the most beautiful regions on the entire island of Ireland, well worth a long stay. And if, in addition, the golf offer is well covered, as is the case, we are facing a first-class tourist destination. And while it's true that Connemara Links is a bit off the beaten track on the West Coast, no one in our group felt the slightest bit of regret about going this far.

The links are located on a remote and charming peninsula an hour and a half from Galway. In any case, the journey, through lakes, hills and beaches, is well worth it, until you reach the narrow road that leads to the club.

As for the course, it was a huge contrast after two days in the wild Enniscrone and Carne. It is a different type of golf and, although certainly less spectacular, the charm of the place and the quality of its holes mean that it does not detract from its illustrious neighbors further north.

In Connemara, the lack of dramatic dunes is made up for by more bunkering, requiring more thought about where to place each shot. Without a doubt, Hackett compensated in this way for the absence of accidents, hazards or dunes, especially in the outer 9.

I have a great appreciation for the first 11 holes, but it is from the 12th that the level of the course increases considerably, with a brutal and wonderful uphill par 4, followed by a long (but delicious) par 3 of more than 200 yards. That hole sends us to the higher part of the property, where the vistas are sublime.

From here on, all the holes present a different and particular challenge, until ending with two phenomenal parallel par 5s, each one of them with its own personality.

Finally, it is more than advisable to dedicate the afternoon to the 9 most recent holes, several of which run parallel to the coast, in a simply dreamlike setting. I can assure you that the feeling of playing your tee shot while wild horses are galloping along the beach a short distance away is something you don´t enjoy every day on a golf course.

June 27, 2022
8 / 10
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tony mancini

Although a mission to get to, its 100% worth it when you arrive. Friendly staff and a wonderful links course that is all played out in front of you and in lovely condition. The 1st nine is probably the slighter better though the back nine has some truly wonderful holes inc. the par 3 13th and the 14th from its elevated tee box. A real gem worth playing

June 22, 2022
8 / 10
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Steve MacQuarrie

I was excited on the first tee when my peg did not slide easily into the ground. That meant the firmness that helps define links golf would be present. And indeed, conditioning at Connemara was the best of a 10 round trip through the north and west of the Irish Republic.

The green complexes were fun and the linksland provided a fun challenge in deciding how far short of each green to land one’s approach. That aspect became less appealing starting at #12 where a series of greens perched on atop rises made for only an aerial approach. This became quite repetitive on the final 5 holes which included three similar par fives, all within 8 yards of each other in length and each playing to an elevated green.

For an Eddie Hackett course, I was surprised at how very few tee shots required a risk/reward assessment. Nonetheless I enjoyed Connemara and thought it properly slotted among Ireland’s top 25 on this site.

June 04, 2022
7 / 10
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Jack Dermody

I have been playing this course off and on for over half my life and I was out there between lockdowns... Over the years the front 9 while more flat has become better and better and back 9 is always glorious... It is just a great course in an incredible area..

February 03, 2021
9 / 10
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Chris Hanson

Connemara is out of the way to say the least. We played it en route from Enniscrone to Lahinch and while it does not measure up to the level of those two, it certainly rates well in my opinion. It's a very windy site and quite a stark but beautiful location with hardly a tree in sight and all the Connemara Marble dotting the landscape. Some handsome ponies in the adjoining paddocks too.

The course itself is difficult enough with the wind to deal with from start to finish as you are across the road from the Atlantic coastline.

It is a well routed course, the first nine being flatter than the second and so not as interesting but still challenging for this mid-handicapper.

The second nine is really top shelf with some heaving undulations, elevated tees, precarious green locations and some tough bunkers.

I enjoyed Connemara immensely, having won our match, and so the Guinness tasted wonderful in the fine clubhouse bar.

September 01, 2020
6 / 10
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Peter Wood

Connemara is located near the remote coastal town of Ballyconeely on a rocky peninsula 75 km west of Galway. As one approaches the area the scenery is dominated by the sea views, vast tracts of rocky terrain and the occasional whitewashed stone cottage.

Just when you think you are lost on this wild peninsula, a sign points you down a country lane where you will find the 27 holes of the Connemara Golf Links sitting on rolling hills overlooking the sea.

The site is utterly exposed to the elements, and Hackett has produced a true links site, but it is one with rocks of all shapes and sizes interspersed Connemara (Championship) Golf Course - Photo by reviewer through the site, although they are rarely in play at all. Whether it be the rocks below the surface or not, the fairways have a traditional rumple throughout, and head off in all directions to offer different angles to play the ever present wind. The Championship Course is longish and would be a stern test of golf even without the wind.

The front nine is somewhat shorter and flatter, but still will prove a good test of golf. The back nine steps it up a little with a little more elevation change, and more of the rocky moonscape surrounding the holes.

The newer nine holes comprising the C course is shorter in length and occupies some coastal land with more movement in the fairways. It may not offer the same stern test of golf, but it does look fun!

Overall Connemara offers a unique setting for a quality links exposed to all of the elements. Real golfers need only apply for a tee time… And if you do, you won't be disappointed!

Peter Wood is the founder of The Travelling Golfer – click the link to read his full review.

October 08, 2019
6 / 10
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Harry J Joe

Very few golf courses leave an indelible impression like the ones that Connemara gave me upon completing the 18th hole. It is one of the few courses where you will experience cold, rain, and winds followed by blazing sun light and heat, all in one round. The topography is one of heavily laden with rocks, humps, mounds, followed by flat terrains. You are out in the middle of nowhere, and it can be seen as being desolate at times. I am glad I played it, but it would not be on my want to play it again list. It is wide open, and extremely challenging. The wind is a constant, as well as the unpredictable weather.

September 17, 2018
6 / 10
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Dan Hare

Connemara is a good, long, fun links in a spectacular location. Getting there may be involved but it's definitely worth the trip, and nearby Clifden is a charming town. The drive from similarly nice Westport is one of the best we've done, remenescent of Rannoch Moor, although if anything quieter. The greens were the best we've played on in 2 weeks, and the lack of sand dunes was a pleasant reduction in stress. The fairways are fairly generous, which is just as well since every non par 3 was a driver off the tee. We are definitely glad we made the trip, one of the very best courses in NW Ireland.

April 28, 2018
8 / 10
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Dan Hare
June 01, 2018

Just to add to the above review, rather than play a parkland course we returned the next day to Connemara and if anything enjoyed the experience even more. The drive out from lovely, friendly Clifden just gets more and more remote, with the beautiful ponies, ruined castle and stunning white sand beach demanding repeated photo stops. The sense of tranquility at Connnemara in 2 days of good, still weather was unparallelled. I can't recommend the trip enough.

Alan Cinnamond

Connemara is the lowest rated of the four courses that we visited on our Wild Atlantic Way golf tour, but is still very highly regarded so we were expecting to be impressed. We were not to be disappointed and in fact it was arguably ahead of the other three venues in some aspects, certainly the most impressive clubhouse setting and up there with Carne in terms of the enchanting unspoiled natural beauty of the location and surroundings. The weather enhanced the experience, as we had the best day of the trip - mostly sunny yet still with the solid two-club prevailing wind.

The front nine of the 'A&B' course meanders around flatlands with dangerous pot bunkering and varied green countours the main defences on the ground. The 1st and 2nd played into the crosswind, the 1st a dogleg left par four that invites a draw tee shot off the rugged rocky hill terrain to the right and the 2nd a straight par four with pot bunkers on both sides of fairway and green. After the testing opening two holes, the short par three third is index 18 and is a very enjoyable hole to play, also aesthetically nice owing to the craggy rock in the background. The par four 4th is a straightish par four, again with pot bunkers on both sides of fairway and green, a comfortable hole when played downwind provided your tee shot can avoid the traps. The 5th hole is the second hardest hole on the front nine card, a dogleg left par four that for us was kind given the helping crosswind on the day, pleasantly flat with pot bunkers scattered about. The par three 6th hole, whilst index 14 on the card, played one of the harder holes of the day as it required wood tee shots for us into the wind. The par five 7th offers quite a wide fairway and would be a great birdie opportunity when not affected by a hurting wind, which is probably never the case! After passing the plaque dedicated to Steve Fossett's 2003 re-enactment of Alcock & Brown's 1919 first non-stop flight across the Atlantic on a biplane, the index 2 8th takes you in the direction of the clubhouse, with no significant fairway bunkering to consider, but an undulating tiered green complex well protected by bunkers short and to the right. The 9th is not unlike the 8th in terms of direction and has more fairway pot bunkers to contend with, but it is a much shorter par four than the 8th off the white tees.

The first three holes of the back nine are broadly in a similar vein to the front nine, before the epic homeward stretch raises the bar substantially. The 10th is a tough par four that was into the wind for our visit and required a 5-wood second shot for me to the elevated green. The 11th is a lovely slightly downhill par three with two pot bunkers on each flank and one large deceiving bunker in front that is in fact much further back from the front of the green than appears from the tee. Whilst many holes on the day were played into a hurting crosswind, the slight dogleg right par four 12th is one of the few holes that played head-on directly into the wind, which when combined with the elevated green and 445 yardage from the tips made it play all all of its index 1.

Leaving the 12th green you find yourself on the high outpost of the course, which signals the beginning of a slightly different stretch of holes until the finish. The par three 13th brings you to a higher altitude than previously experienced thus far and is positioned alongside some of the most rugged rocky lunar terrain amidst the dunes. It is a long par three with a slope in front of the green making it difficult to find the surface, also with three pot bunkers lurking front and back, one of the best holes on the course. Then you ascend higher again to reach the 14th tee and what is an absolutely jaw-dropping view of the entire course and surroundings. It is a straight par five played in a southwesterly direction towards the ocean with a significant drop from tee to fairway and OB all down the right side. The green was reachable in two for us but our second shots were cruelly diverted left and short rolling back down the steep slope just in front of the green, a tricky feature along with the five bunkers short of the green. Definitely one of my favourite holes of the trip.

The next two holes are tough par fours, the 15th is without bunkers but if it plays in to the wind, as it did for us, finding the relatively small and elevated green in two with hairy dunes on three sides is a difficult task and its index 3 rating is no surprise. The 16th plays back downwind towards the clubhouse but is not an easy fairway to hit as it doglegs slightly to the left at the landing area. There is a burn about 30 yards short of the green, three pot bunkers to contend with for the approach and the green itself is one of the more undulating on the course.

The finish at Connemara GC offers two par fives in succession routed in opposite directions. The 17th back tee is on elevated ground in front of the clubhouse played to an inviting wide and flattish fairway with no bunkers from tee to green. Whilst the hole measures 500 yards and might sound easy, the approach to the green is another steep rise in elevation and playing into the wind it actually demanded three very solid shots to make the green, another with long dune grasses threatening on three sides. The 18th here rivals the 18th at Carne in terms of the combination of stunning views and hole design, both par fives with downhill tee shots and with inclines back up towards raised greens, what surely must be two of the best finishing holes in the country. For those laying up, a burn crossing the fairway 100 yards in front of the green must be considered for second shots, and for the longer hitters the green is reachable in two downwind, although the second shot will have to fly all the way to the putting surface and carry the four pot bunkers and the steep slope before the green.

Pick of the holes:

Par three - 13th

Par fours - 5th, 16th

Par five - 14th

Read more of my course reviews here: https://thescramblergolf.wordpress.com

October 11, 2017
10 / 10
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Gustav

Should you put Connemara on your next Irish golf trip itinerary?

The honest answer is “probably not”.

This is not because the course is bad in any way. In fact it is almost visually unique among links courses with all the bare rock close to the playing surface. The sea and landscape views are as lovely. The layout is also sympathetic with the more forgiving golf on the front nine and the longer, tougher holes on the back nine. For matches and twilight rounds it is also great to come back to the clubhouse after hole no 16.

We saved the third “C” loop of nine holes for our day two but quickly decided that once was enough. Some of the holes are fantastic designs on their own, but the long walks between holes make this nine feel like an afterthought. My advice is to play two rounds on the main 18 holes instead, unless you are a keen student of golf course architecture.

So, indeed, why not Connemara on your next Irish golf trip ?

You go to courses like Connemara for two reasons: (1) they fit into an itinerary where you play also other courses over 3-7 days or (2) they are great, out-of-the-way weekend type destinations on their own, a bit like Machihanish if you like.

Ballyconneely does not fit into the first category. It simply is too far away from other top-ranked Irish golf courses. It took us almost three hours northwards to get to Carne; it would have taken about the same time had we gone south to Lahinch. In the second category there are better combinations of accessibility, affordability and quality in Ireland: Ballyliffin comes to mind.

Therefore, I am afraid that future reviews on this site may also comment on the remoteness of this place and, perhaps also, praise Connemara as an undiscovered gem.

October 03, 2016
6 / 10
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Dan Hare
April 28, 2018

Connemara may well be remote, necessitating playing it en route, but nearby Clifden is a great place to stay and the drive up to pretty Westport as a staging post for Carne takes one through spectacular scenery.