Cypress Point - California - USA

Cypress Point Club,
17 Mile Drive,
Pebble Beach,
California (CA) 93953,
USA


  • +1 831 624 6444

  • Leave Hwy 1 at Pacific Grove exit follow Carmel Hill towards Pebble Beach

  • Members and their guests only



Every true golfer would love to play Cypress Point, but the reality of the matter is that unless you are in the know only a lucky few will ever get the chance to tee it up on the 1st. Folklore has it that J.F. Kennedy was once refused entry to the restaurant and, with only 250 members, mere mortals find it hard to get a game.

Cypress Point Club is set at the foothills of the Santa Lucia Mountains on the very tip of the Monterey Peninsula and the cliff top terrain is varied and thrilling. Almost as many superlatives have been used to describe the beauty of the location as the course itself.

Masa Nishijima, co-author of Tom Doak’s Confidential Guide to Golf Courses, commented as follows: “Seth Raynor was under contract to do the course, but Raynor passed away in 1926 before the start of construction, and Robert Hunter managed to convince the client to let Dr. MacKenzie have a look at the course when he made his first visit to California later that year.”

“The best 17-hole course in the world” is how Cypress Point has been described. The closing hole is considered by some to be little more than a route back to the clubhouse and perhaps the 16th hole is a weakness too, especially if you can’t carry the ball more than 200 yards into the prevailing wind. The Pacific is the ultimate water hazard on this 231-yard one-shot hole. It’s considered the best golf hole in the world or the worst if you dump your third tee shot into the sea.

David commented on our Cypress Point article. We feel his points are valid and worthy of sharing:

“While most of your course intros seem ok, this one is really off. It was one guy, Jimmy Demaret that called Cypress Point the best 17-hole course he's ever played. He was a great pro, but not an expert in golf course architecture by any means. Granted the 18th might be a little strange, but it's a great hole in its own right. At most courses maybe even their signature hole. A blind tee shot over Cypress Trees to a narrow fairway the dog legs steep up a hill to a green sloping form back to front with a huge cypress tree blocking out the entire left side of the green requiring a perfect drive to have a chance at the green with a shaped approach from an uneven lie. Land it too deep above the hole and you’re faced with a treacherous putt, miss right while shaping your shot and you are in one of the bunkers guarding the green. Does that sound at all like a weak hole?

Also the 16th is not properly described. In typical MacKenzie fashion this hole can be played many ways. He always leaves a way for weaker golfers. The 16th is no different. If the carry is impossible for your ability level you can play left requiring a carry of around or less than 100 yards to a partially hidden fairway and play this hole as a par 4. Any level can do this. I watched a 92 year old man par the hole with no problem in that fashion. So I'd argue this is not my opinion even, it's just plain fact which makes the intro you have incorrect and a bit unfair to Cypress Point and to MacKenzie.”
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Reviews for Cypress Point

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Description: Cypress Point Club is set at the foothills of the Santa Lucia Mountains on the very tip of the Monterey Peninsula and the cliff top terrain is varied and thrilling. Rating: 9.8 out of 10 Reviews: 30
TaylorMade
Ed Hall
I managed to join the fortunate few and play here in early June, after 18 months of planning a California golf trip and using some old friends and connections, of which I was very fortunate to be put in touch with a member. The chance to experience Cypress Point for a day, as far as I am concerned, was worth putting in all the effort as it was my first trip to the west coast and you never know how many other opportunities you will get in life.

After final confirmation that we were all set to go, we set off from Monterey early morning down 17 Mile Drive, one of the most scenic drives in the world. You can see the 1st hole, 2nd tee shot, 13th green and 14th tee shot from the road, and if you peek through the trees, you can catch a glimpse of the 15th green. These views certainly got us in the mood! One factor of the club is that the only sign for the course is on the turning – the famous sign saying ‘Cypress Point Members Only’, which gives you an idea on the intentions of the club. This is a place which prefers to remain anonymous and available for its members and guests only … members of the public are turned away if they don’t have permission. It’s what makes it so special to play, but also what makes it so frustrating for the majority of golfers who dream of playing here.

The 1st tee is little more than 3 or 4 paces from the pro shop & locker rooms, so you usually have an audience of around 15-20 people watching your first tee shot, which has to carry over the main road and over a hedge down to the wide fairway below. Caddies are compulsory and one is assigned to 2 bags. Our caddie on the day had been there for 25 years and proved invaluable in giving directions and lines, plus he was extremely friendly and relayed various stories of years gone by, which only added to the experience.

The course itself is as strategic as they come. Bunkers always appear where you don’t want them, the greens are lightning quick and have severe slopes, especially on the shorter par 4’s, and the fairways are extremely generous … you won’t lose many balls on the first 14 holes at least. It’s all about the angles into the green on the 2nd shot, and Alister MacKenzie was a master in making the greens look further away and smaller than they actually are. Also, the flagsticks are slightly smaller than normal, which only adds to the ‘distant’ nature of the approach shots. You find yourself aiming away from the flags and into the wider parts of the greens, especially when the pins are tucked away. It’s easy to make par but very difficult to make birdie, something that has always been said about one of his other courses, Augusta National.

Cypress Point Club 4th holeAfter a cracking 1st hole, where you drive down into the wide fairway with the edge of the Pacific in view, and a nasty green that slopes heavily from back to front (stay short of the flag), you head into the woods on the 2nd, the longest hole on the course and a difficult carry over a sandy canyon. After a decent par 3 3rd hole, the course really starts with the 4th, where the tee shot tries to push you towards the trees on the right, leaving you blocked out with your approach to the green, which is also sloped back to front. Any downhill putt on these greens must be treated with extreme caution, as the ball never seems to stop rolling … I barely breathed on a 20 footer at 4 and it ran 10 feet by. The 5th is a par 5 uphill in the thick of the woods (and the furthest point from the clubhouse) with loads of bunkers everywhere, the 6th is a reachable par 5 and the 7th is a short par 3 into the dunes surrounded by sand. All very nice holes, but you feel like you’re waiting to see what the course has to offer at this point.

Cypress Point Club 8th hole So you stand on the 8th tee, looking back towards the clubhouse, and all you can see is sand and a tiny sliver of fairway on the left. This is one of the great par 4’s in golf, 330 yards uphill, a sharp dog-leg left to right with sandy waste area to the right. Miss it right and you can only hack back to the fairway, miss it left and you have a long shot to an uphill green with a huge step in it. The flag was back left at the top of the slope, with about 15 feet of landing area, one of the narrowest parts to a green I have seen. There were deep bunkers short and bushes (& more sand) over the back, with a huge drop off to the left … in other words, if you don’t hit a perfect shot, you’re making 5 or 6 at best. My caddie told me to play for the front right of the green, and after talking myself out of going for the flag, I did as I was told, made a good 2-putt up the green from 40 feet, and was the only person walking off with less than a 6. Brilliant hole.

The 9th is another short par 4, only 300 yards off the back tees and usually into the wind, and although I hit a driver just short and got up & down for a 3 (my only birdie of the day), this is another cracker of a short hole. The widest part of the fairway is around 180-200 yards from the tee, the fairways is completely surrounded by sand, some of it deep, and the green is again heavily sloped from back to front – anything past the flag will run off the front of the green and about 30 yards down the fairway. 10 and 11 give you a bit of a respite, 10 is a short par 5 with a wide fairway and a decent-sized green, 11 has a large bunker in the middle of the fairway but you have room to the left to hit round and there are no horrors on the green itself.

Cypress Point Club 13th holeThe 12th, after hitting your tee shot towards the clubhouse once again, bends sharply right, and it’s now that you start hitting back towards the Pacific and heading back towards civilisation, and the course steps up another gear again. The 2nd shot is on an upslope to a narrow green, and again, you don’t want to miss it left or right, but leaving it short is ok. The 13th is a brilliant hole, with at least a 50/60 yard wide fairway, but you need to hit it down the right, and of course that is where all the trouble is. The green is again small, which it should be for a shortish par 4, and close to the Pacific, so you can hear the seals barking away, and the road, so you can see all the cars with their drivers looking at you, thinking ‘lucky b*****d’! The 14th tee is above the 13th green and the road, with the 1st fairway to your left … miss it right and you are blocked out by the trees, miss it left and you have no shot. The 2nd shot has no margin for error – the green is in a private glade surrounded entirely by bushes and trees, so even though you are right by the main road, you feel totally secluded and private … one of the best spots on the course.

Cypress Point Club 16th holeNow for one of the best walks in golf – crossing the road from the 14th green past the ‘Private Keep Out’ signs and the fencing, and up to the 15th tee. A lot is said about the 16th, but this was my favourite shot on the course – around 140 yards to a narrow green surrounded by sand and the Pacific on the right. The wind seems to pick up here as well – we played 14 in a light breeze, and 15 into a 20-25mph wind! There is some space on the left if you miss the green, but the chip is down the green and tough to stop. Once leaving the green, you walk through various trees for 100 yards before you hit the 16th tee and one of the most famous views in golf. At 231 yards off the back tees, and with a small green, Pacific Ocean left and right, and a huge bunker over the back, you have 2 options – take a 7 or 8 iron and play for the fairway down the left near the tree, or hit a 3 wood (or driver) and hope for the best. I somehow managed to hit my best 3 wood of the holiday onto the back of the green and 2 putted for a 3, and it is a great hole, but in my opinion it’s a bit too difficult … it’s either green or oblivion, unless you play it as a par 4. But what a feeling to stand there on the tee … you feel genuinely speechless looking at the green, having looked at it countless times online or in magazines, and it looks better in real life (and the green looks smaller!).

Cypress Point Club 17th holeThe best view of all is on the 17th tee – you look back down the 16th and part of the 15th to your left, and ahead of you is the fairway and cypress trees in the middle, with the ocean and rocks to your right. The hole itself is tough – you have to either hit it left of the trees, which is a big hit off the back tees, or you lay up around 40-50 yards short of them, leaving around 170 yards for your 2nd shot either over the trees or around them to the green. Again, anything right is into the Pacific. And if you over-compensate to the left, there are low-lying trees and bushes waiting for you, so you can only chip out to the fairway. Into the wind, this is a really tough hole. And you finish on 18 – loads of people don’t like it, and I can see why … you have to hit over a tree with your tee shot, but no more than 200 yards, leaving yourself the best angle to the green. Anything left is blocked out by the trees encroaching just short of the green, anything right leaves you with no shot but a chip out. And the 2nd shot is very much uphill to another narrow green with a steep slope back to front, so you can’t see where your ball ends up. It feels completely different to the rest of the course, and although it’s a good golf hole in its own right, it feels like an after-thought to what has gone on before.

In terms of cost for playing here, it cost me around $250, this includes green fee, caddie fee and tip … compared to the cost at Pebble Beach, it’s a bargain! It’s a truly special place, where you feel privileged to be there, and we didn’t really want to leave at the end. A busy day there is 8-10 groups on the course, so you have no-one in front of you and no-one pressuring you from behind, leaving you free to concentrate on your game and enjoying the scenery. The course was in immaculate condition, with hardly a blade of grass out of place, the houses surrounding the course are all at a discreet distance away, so it’s almost impossible to hit out of bounds, and the elevation changes are gentle apart from the 1st and 18th.

In terms of spectacular coastline golf, Pebble Beach has the better stretch of holes (4-10 & 18) in my opinion, but Cypress Point gives you a much more rich & rewarding golfing experience. Every shot, every putt, demands your total attention. I feel truly fortunate to play here and I sincerely hope many more readers of this site get the chance to play, because it really is an experience like no other.
June 18, 2015
10 / 10
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6 people found this review helpful

Larry Berle
If I had to choose to play on only one course for the rest of my life, I would play Cypress Point… I was a very popular person with my golf buddies at home in the weeks leading up to my Cypress Point tee time. Cypress Point allows two unaccompanied foursomes every morning between 7:30 and 8:30, so I could bring three friends of my choosing to play on one of the most beautiful courses in the world.

Alister MacKenzie, one of golf’s great architects, designed Cypress Point in 1928. Even though it breaks many of the basic tenets of golf course design – the first hole plays across a road I’m sure didn’t exist in 1928, and there are two back-to-back par 5’s on the front nine and two back-to-back par 3’s on the back nine – Cypress Point ranks consistently in the Top 5 of every golf publication’s top courses list. Robert Louis Stevenson once said, “Monterey Peninsula is the most felicitous meeting of land and sea in creation.” Its emerald-green fairways wind through the rugged hills and dunes of the Monterey Peninsula lined with beautiful pine and cypress trees. Many deer and elk call these fairways and greens home. There are three par 5’s on the front nine and all are risky, though not long. Holes 8 and 9 are on everyone’s list of great par 4’s. Number 8 is a 345-yard, 90-degree dogleg right, cut through the rolling dunes to a plateau green. Number 9 is less than 300 yards, but 300 of the most challenging yards in golf, especially when the wind is blowing, as it usually is. Larry Berle.
September 30, 2014
10 / 10
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Keith Baxter
September 30, 2014
The above review is an edited extract from A Golfer’s Dream, which has been reproduced with the author’s kind permission. A Golfer’s Dream, by Larry Berle, tells the story of how a regular guy conquered America’s Top 100 Golf Courses (following Golf Digest’s 2001/2002 list). Larry has exclusively rated for us every course in the hundred, using our golf ball rating system. However, Larry did not rate the 100 courses against every golf course he has played, but instead he rated them in relation to each other within the hundred. Consequently, in some cases, his rating may seem rather low. A Golfer’s Dream is available in Kindle format and also on Kindle Unlimited via Amazon... click the link for more. 
DAO
October 17, 2014
That's great but a useless review to all but a tiny percentage of the golfers in the world. Private courses should not be ranked as there is no objectivity in the review
John
October 18, 2014
DAO perhaps you should just refer to the Zagat guide, it lists all the public access courses in the USA. However, with a little knowledge and some common sense, most private US courses are accessible. There are plenty of publications that rate the Top 100 you can play… the problem with those lists is that you’ll end up playing mainly resort and second tier courses. Personally I’d rather spend my money and time playing the best and for what it’s worth I’ve played Cypress twice and it’s my favorite course in the world, I like it more than Pine Valley and Royal County Down. There’s nothing not to like about Cypress, that’s why there are no negative comments. You need to get out more and try a different approach, it may open your eyes and you might perceive the glass is half full rather than half empty.
DAO
October 19, 2014
You have missed the point John. Considering I live in quiet a remote location, I do get out quite a bit and have played in US (Pebble, Chambers Bay, Pinehurst and Bandon), South Africa and 70+ of top 100 in the UK including all of top 20. There are 5 reviews in the last 8 years for Oakmont for example, I am questioning the relevance of reviews of private courses, that's all.
John
November 17, 2014
DAO, if you don't find reviews for private courses relevant, then don't read them.
Fergal O'Leary
Cypress Point Golf Course - Photo by Javier PintosSo much has been written about this legendary course crafted by Mother Nature and completed by Alister MacKenzie, yet the aggregate of all that has been reported doesn’t even come close to describing its unique natural beauty and world-renowned brilliance. Every time I open my eyes and the Cypress Point Club is all that I can see, it’s as close to an out of body experience that a golfer can have.
December 09, 2013
10 / 10
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Michael
December 09, 2013
Thanks for that review.
Steven
Truly one of the best. Lucky enough to play it this April and have been invited back again in October which I can't wait for. Really looking forward to the 2nd time as the 1st time was just a surreal blur! Coming from Australia where we are lucky to have heaps of Alister MacKenzie brilliance, getting the chance to experience Cypress Point was amazing. The Par 5 5th is one of the best strucutred holes I've played and 8&9 are two of the best short par 4s in the World. Truly strategic. 13 back into the ocean is one of my favourite second shots of all time and then once you walk off 14 and cross the road to the private part of the course it is like entering Disneyland, starting with a classic short Par 3. A ripping hole indeed. 16 is the only problem - too hard for most golfers. MacKenzie didn't want to build it as I understand but Marion made him - it's entertaining none the less. There are far better long Par 3s out there but none with that view :). 17 is then just pure gold. The tee box, the tee shot, the strategy, the walk, the second shot in over the Cyrpess trees (or around if you hit a good drive....). Awesome.And as for the golf course being described as the best 17 holes ever built that is wrong. Completely wrong. 18 is awesome. It makes you 'have' to hit two good shots to have a go at par - and they are the hardest two shots to play - straight ones.A very very fun day.
September 28, 2012
10 / 10
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Lawson Gay
I have played many of the worlds best over the years and I can honestly say that Cypress Point lives up to its billing as one of the greatest courses in the world. From the undulations of the fairways to the contours of the greens Dr Mackenzie created a masterpiece. You are given a quick glimpse of the ocean on a couple of occasions over the first 11 holes but miss it very little. The inland holes are so beautifully crafted and designed that feel that you are playing a parkland course. Numbers 12, 13 and 14 are fantastic holes that play alongside the coast.......Then you cross the street and round the corner to number 15 tee and it hits you that this may very well be the most beautiful place on earth. Seals, whales and birds on the rocks and in the ocean. Back to back par 3's that challenge you......one short and tight and the other a 220 yard carry over water to the green (if the wind isn't blowing). 17 itself is a tough par 4 that carves around the trees to the green. If ever you feel that you are content in this crazy game of ours it s when you leave a course such as this and think back over your round......it has been 2 weeks for me now and I relive it daily.....Oh......I made a 2 on 16.........driver into the wind and a 10 ft putt......
December 13, 2011
10 / 10
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David Davis
In March of this year I had the honor of being invited by a member to play Cypress Point. There is no question that it will be one of the greatest golf experiences if not the greatest of my life. However before I try to put it into words something I find extremely difficult I wanted to answer a question that had been asked below. What are the green fees at extremely private courses in the US? Speaking only from my personal experience, ie perhaps other people have other experiences, I can share with you that in 99% of the cases there are no greenfees, as a guest (because that’s the only way to get on these courses) you are not allowed to see a bill or pay for anything, with a couple exceptions. It is to my knowledge proper etiquette to kindly ask your host if you may pay for your caddy, should you have one. In most cases this will be allowed. It is also proper to ask them what they would find an appropriate fee (that is if you have no idea yourself). I also always invite my hosts to dinner as well as offer to host them or any of their friends or acquaintances that might be travelling to my part of the world, be it for golf, business or pleasure.

Cypress Point Club - photo of David the reviewerFor me Cypress Point is the most expensive course I’ve ever played and yet the green fee was free. The caddy fee was $150 (my half, he had two bags, no problem), however, in order to accept the invite I had to change my plane ticket back to Amsterdam where I live, it wasn’t changeable, $1500 later I had a new return ticket a day later. On top of that I didn’t properly request permission from my now ex-fiancée before booking my trip, a fit was raised, there was no understanding and as a result no more relationship. Sad but true, I bet there isn’t a single golfer reading this that wouldn’t of understood how special this opportunity was and granted at least a hint of understanding. Thanks guys! Honestly, I’ll happily break off the next wedding as well if she won’t understand the need for me to accept the Augusta/Pine Valley invites if and when they come. I mean I would clearly understand the multiple long weekend shopping trips to Milan as a matter of exchange.

I attended a member/guest day, starting with drinks and lunch, our game and then cocktails after we finished. Expecting a good sized group I was rather shocked that there were a total of three guests (2 golfers) and 5 members that attended. Three of which my host had invited just to join for lunch because he had a guest from overseas. What an honor! Among them were a famous golf historian and wonderful gentleman and ex Cypress Point pro who shares the course record of 63 with Ben Hogan. At 41 years old I was the baby of the group, my host was 92 years young at time. The rich history and stories were flowing throughout, I just sat back and soaked it all up from gentlemen that had experienced it all first hand.

Cypress Point Club - photo by DavidAs prep for my round I had read ”The Match” by Mark Frost which depicts one of the most important golf matches of all time between pros, Byron Nelson and Ben Hogan against amateurs Harvey Ward and Ken Venturi which takes place at Cypress Point. A must read for golf fans. The round itself, well Cypress Point is amazing, the course plays much like the reading of a great novel that builds slowly to an amazing climax, the first 6 holes winding their way through the coastal pine forest with the next 6 holes running through the dunes only to reach an amazing climax unique in the golf world with the last holes all running near or along the ocean. We had a perfect day, beautiful blue skies and a light 1-2 club breeze blowing.

Upon reaching the 15th hole I was already in awe and while as previously mentioned it was but a short iron. I believe I hit a 9 myself on the day into the wind. It’s the most beautiful golf hole I’ve ever seen. The 16th makes your heart beat in your throat, hitting straight into the wind. It was arguably a driver on our day, 231 yds plus a 2 club breeze into your face. I chose a 3 wood and decided to give it a bit more. Unlike the chaps below that all seem to hit the ball to a tap in distance on this tough hole I pulled mine left, tough to control the adrenaline rush. Luckily for me the ice plant stopped it from going off the cliff to the left of the green. I chunked it out and escaped with a bogey. My provisional ended on the front right side of the green. All the gentlemen I played with also made bogeys by taking McKenzie’s alternative route to the left which allows you to play the hole as a par 4 with only a 100 yard carry to a partially blind fairway.

Cypress Point Club - photo by DavidIt was however on the 17th tee box that I was struck by the hand of golf enlightenment and had an emotional moment I am sure will not soon be equaled. Standing on the tee box perched atop the rock outcropping surrounded by the Pacific with waves crashing all around and sea lions barking a group of whales breached off to our right and it hit me that was one of the most beautiful places I’ve ever seen in all my travels. A truly emotional moment, I hung back from the group to take it all in, every one to the man understood and claimed to be honored with my reaction, after all that may well be the desired effect of this masterpiece and as MacKenzie stated there will never be a another course graced with the magical natural surroundings with which he had to work with.

An amazing round of golf for me is much more than playing well on a nice course, I shot a 79 on the day which wasn’t great and even missed my put to win our match on the last hole, tough with tears in your eyes I must admit. At Cypress Point it was the total experience, the camaraderie, the history, the beauty, the course itself, the service and welcome, my game on the day and the emotional impact that made this the greatest round of golf in my life.
September 07, 2011
10 / 10
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JT
September 07, 2011
What a wonderful review, thanks for sharing your experiences, you are a very fortunate man!
Brian S
September 08, 2011
You highlight one very important factor in a great experience at a golf course. The course is only one part of it. If the other intangibles don't come off, it won't be great. You sound like you had a fantastic host who made the day very special for you.
martin Lehmann
September 15, 2011
I have been to Cypress Point a couple of years ago but didn't get passed the entrance gate where I stood like a little boy in front of a candy store gazing through the steel bars to get a glimpse of the course before I was sent away by an extremely unfriendly women. You are a lucky man. Really liked your review which shows deep understanding, love and respect for the greatest game on earth.
Javier Pintos
“Gave it all in 3 holes”: my unforgettable round at Cypress Point. During early March 2011 a friend of mine suggested me to invite two newyorkers that were visiting Argentina to play my home course, Golf Club Argentino. This couple named Peter and Marie Minnick happened to be members of Maidstone and friends of members of the most private courses in USA. Cypress Point - Photo by reviewerDuring the round I spoke a lot to them about my business and how I was involved in the golf industry and they showed a lot of interest, and the will to help me to get more golfers to Argentina. And I also told them about the IAGTO NAC in Monterey, California. It happened that after golf and during lunch, Marie told me she could get me to play Cypress Point and that she would be very glad to make the try, to what I answered that it would make me the happiest golfer on earth.

Some days later and after knowing my schedule for the show, I emailed Marie with possible dates to play CP and just a couple of hours later I got the confirmation for a fourball on May 23rd! What is even better is that I could invite some friends to share the unique experience. So I got in contact with Alberto Agrest, a lifetime friend living in NY and who invited me to play Winged Foot and National Links of America some years ago and also told him to invite his 17 year old son Tommy, who is also a scratch golfer. Juan Pablo De Bary, golfing mate from Buenos Aires, completed the fourball. Just as an addition, we played all together Black Horse, Pasatiempo and Spyglass as well, not a bad golfing trip at all!!!!

The night before I was so anxious I could hardly sleep thinking all the time on the moment we arrived to tee 16th, the most famous spot on the Golf Course. We arrived very early to Cypress, around 7:15am and after some short warming up at the putting green and changing shoes at the locker room, we started the adventure of playing an authentic jewel. The Club House is charming and simple, as well as the small proshop in which you can find a big variety of stuff to buy as a lifetime memory from your visit to this golfing meca. The course is a masterpiece in every aspect: design, shape, variety, landscaping, views … everything gets together to make your round a big star in your golfing life.

The course can be divided into 4 parts: the first 6 holes in which you play inside the forest, but where you find lots of different challenges as the 2nd shot on par 5 5th, the tee shot on par 5 2nd or tee shot to par 3 7th in which you have to be really very precise. The second part is when you first play towards the sea at tee 8th and tee 9th, two really very interesting tee shots and even harder approaches, then you have easy par 5 10th as an impasse to 4 consecutive par 4s where you can destroy your round. Actually I gave it all between 11 and 13: after a slow start I birdied 9th and 10th to stand 1 over par at tee 11th and then my caddie Marty said “Here is where the golf course begins” and he was right as I gave 7 shots on those 3 holes!!

In this spot Marty my caddie told me the best story of the day: young Andy Bean was 7 under (32 on front nine plus eagle on 10) on the AT&T Pro-am on a day of very strong wind we he was told to try not to spoil his round in the wind, “I saw it all” was his answer. The story Cypress Point - Photo by reviewerends with a 13 over 48 on the back nine including that eagle, amazing!!!! Something similar happened to me and it was really disappointing as I dreamed to score a good round, but sometimes this happens. After two good shots and a narrow birdie miss on 14th we followed to the last, best and nicest part of the course.

The walk to tee 15th is adrenalinic, once you climb those last steps you stand in the all life dreamed spot in golf. Those 4 last holes are not only nice but also challenging and in different way: 15th is a short iron but surroundings can really distract you (hit the green and 2 putts for par), 16th is the bravest carry I have ever faced (together with 13th hole at Punta Espada in Cap Cana) where I narrowly missed the green but up and down for par (I also hit a mulligan and got it towards 20 feet from the pin), then 17th is a panoramic but not that tough drive (driver, 58° and 2 putts for par) and finally 18th a very nice tee box by the sea heading to a very nice uphill par 4 with a very elevated green, another par for the nicest walk I ever made playing golf.

What else can I say? I keep as a memory the scorecard, yardage book, the club rules, the invitation letter and some stuff bought at the small and charming proshop. If you are ever lucky to play this course, try not to get too distracted with the atmosphere and views, try to play golf!!! When I got some concentration I hit really good shots, but every now and then distraction and too many pictures cost me a lot of strokes. If it happens that I am invited again, I will not take my camera, and I will try only to hit a couple of decent golf shots and not to lose focus. An unforgettable golf round, a lifetime achievement, the chance of breathing the truest possible golf experience, the chance to watch a masterpiece in design, the opportunity to be an elite golfer for one day, to listen to the best golfing stories in the last century … CYPRESS POINT IS ALL THAT TOGETHER!!!
June 15, 2011
10 / 10
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David Wilkinson
There are plenty of par 3 tee shots to get the adrenaline going in every golfer: Perhaps the 17th at TPC Sawgrass, the 12th at Augusta or the ‘postage stamp’ 8th at Royal Troon. However, nothing can compare to the daunting task of carrying 215 yards of open Pacific Ocean as the waves crash onto rocks far below the cliff on which you stand. Not to mention that five bunkers surround the green, should you be so bold as to make it there. Of course, there is a bailout option with a shorter carry to the left, but this is a par 3 and which self-respecting golfer would shy away from the challenge? After all, this is the 16th at Cypress Point!

Course reviewer David donates a ball to the PacificLike many before and many to follow, I gifted the Pacific yet another ball after it cannoned off the cliff face, just a couple of feet below the green. Despite my heroic attempt failing, this was the most exhilarating and fulfilling experience of my golfing life. Of course it’s not a purist’s par 3, as you need to be a long-hitter and a straight long-hitter at that, just to have a chance of making the green in regulation. The 16th is pure fantasy and the feeling as I emerged from the cluster of Cypress trees to see the most glorious sight in golf will stay with me for the rest of my life.

Make no mistake though, the holes leading up to and following the fabled par 3, are far from a support act. In my opinion, this is the most perfect golf course on earth, with eighteen beautifully-crafted holes forming Alister Mackenzie’s most thrilling progression of twists and turns. Unlike many of its neighbours, Cypress Point does not boast a palatial clubhouse. It is a relatively small building with its locker room appearing unchanged in a hundred years and a tiny pro shop, with odds and ends of club merchandise crammed-in on rails and tables. Whilst guests are not allowed in the clubhouse without being accompanied by a member, I found all of the staff and caddies to be incredibly friendly and welcoming. Their guidance was crucial at the 1st tee, where a six-foot hedge stands between you and the fairway. Only after emerging from behind this obstacle does it truly feel like you are on the course.

The par 4 1st serves as a gentle introduction before McKenzie tests you with the longest hole on the course, a tricky par 5 which climbs steadily away from the ocean and towards the forest. The 3rd is a relatively straightforward par 3, requiring a decent mid to high iron shot to avoid a series of sprawling bunkers, which will punish anything falling short and right. Following a tight tee-shot on the par 4 4th hole, you journey into the forest and face a tricky uphill approach into an undulating green. It feels like a different course here, as the tall Monterey Pines grow denser and narrow the fairways on surely the best back-to-back par 5s to be found anywhere. The 5th hole perfectly divides each one of your shots to the green with three distinct plateaus, separated by steep uphill climbs and classic McKenzie bunker complexes. Number six curves gently to the left and swoops softly down back towards the dunes, with a long and narrow bunker cleverly-positioned behind the green to deter longer hitters blasting a 3-wood at the pin. These par 5s are designed to be played as such and with steady, straight shots, I managed to play them in regulation. The tree-lined fairways and measured terrain changes test your accuracy before progressing onto the dunes, where the par 3 7th leads onto a ledge, from which you hit a blind tee shot on the dog-leg 8th over a monstrous dune. It is not necessary to shape your shot left to right here, but simply to take a line from the caddie and hit a straight drive which will set you up for a short iron or wedge up to the T-shaped green.

The 9th tee provides one of the great vistas of Cypress point, looking over the picturesque bunkering around the 13th green with the Pacific Ocean in the background. 9, 10 and 11 all present choices on line and length to be made from the tee, but the way in which the holes lie mean you can map out your route to the green, without any blind shots to contend with. McKenzie’s philosophy on minimising blind shots is then displayed alongside his belief that a course should utilise natural beauty, as the 12th and 13th feature remarkable examples of bunkers blending seamlessly into sand dunes.

Cue scene change again, as you leave the dunes behind and begin the stunning sequence of ocean holes. A wide open fairway on 14 invites you to open your shoulders before steering your approach shot through a narrow gap in the Cypress trees to a small green which slopes significantly back to front. Now onto the most idyllic and thrilling three-hole progression in the world, due in large part to the incredible scenery, dramatic cliffs and invigorating ocean breeze. The way in which McKenzie utilised the jagged coastline here though is nothing short of genius. Only Amen Corner at Augusta National can come anywhere close to the notoriety of this trio. With back-to-back par 3s at 15 and 16, you are challenged by tee shots over gushing waves and families of seals on the rocks below, but also by undulating greens and intricate bunkers which drain balls from the edge of the putting surface.

Cypress Point 15th - photo by DavidDespite being the shortest hole on the course with the highest stroke index, I would argue that the 15th is far from the easiest. A short and high flight is required to battle with the ocean wind off the tee and no less than eight bunkers surround Cypress Point’s smallest green. It presents a totally different set of challenges to the 16th, which requires a solid fairway wood or even driver, for most amateurs to consider getting close to the green. The 17th then gives no respite as it demands yet another tee shot across the ocean to a fairway aligned tightly with the cliff-top. However, the biggest hazard here is a clump of trees which break up the direct route to the green. They force a choice of playing safely around to the left, or flirting with another steep drop into the water by cutting the corner from the right of the fairway. Whilst my approach came up short of the green here, I was saved from losing another ball by a greenside bunker with a thirty-foot drop from its back lip onto the rocks below.

Before playing Cypress Point, I had seen the 18th described as little more than a walk back to the clubhouse and the one weakness in McKenzie’s masterpiece. I beg to differ, as it is perhaps only because of the dramatic progression leading up to the final hole that a golfer leaves slightly disappointed with the finale. The 18th actually requires precise placement off the tee, where a drive to the left half of the fairway will set up a straight shot up through the tight chute of tall Cypress trees to the green. After watching my trademark fade/slice return on this hole though, I was left with no line to the green and had to play sideways before making my approach. The final green slopes consistently back to front and sits in the shadow of the understated green and white clubhouse. Faced with a long putt here, I pictured Ben Hogan draining his lengthy birdie effort in 1956, when he set the course record of 63 which still stands today. Try telling the ‘Hawk’ that the 18th is a stroll back to the clubhouse!

Granted, the vast majority of golfers will only ever dream of playing Cypress Point. I count myself as immensely privileged to have been invited through the gates to experience the majesty of Monterey’s crown jewel. The vivid detail I have recounted in this review bears testament to the elation and excitement on every hole. Cypress Point filled me with a sense of awe that I am sure no other golf course on earth could match.
June 09, 2010
10 / 10
Reviewer Score:
TaylorMade

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Sam
November 25, 2010
I know this sounds stupid but is it possible for anyone who has played this course, or any private courses in USA that are in the top 100, to put a few examples of green fees on here. Being from the UK we are not used to this 'members and their guests only' and would love to know how much people have to pay to be a 'guest'?
JAS
January 24, 2011
Doesn't sound stupid at all Sam, The exclusivity of the top American Courses is something that wrankles with me as I've always viewed golf as a peoples game to be enjoyed by millions not be the preserve of the few. Quite frankly a members only course should automatically lose a ball for it's lack of access. Furthermore if a Cypress, Augusta, Pine Valley or Shinnecock member rolled up at St Andrews or Carnoustie (Municiples & therefore owned by the people) and wanted a game should be met with a "let us play yours and you can play ours"
Sam
January 25, 2011
To be honest it surprises me greatly that the limits on the availability of golf in America doesn't cause more fuss. If it became par for the course in the UK I know the game would greatly suffer and dissolve. We have hardly any totally private courses and I am very proud to say that! I know people pay obscene amounts to be members of exclusive courses, and that I'm guessing is the status and bragging rights of it, but golf, in the UK, is still the peoples game and I hate the fact that people can't get the chance to step in the footsteps of their heroes. Surely one 4-ball a day won't hurt!
chappers
April 17, 2011
Sam guest fees are usually in the region of $150 to $250 plus caddie
Javier Pintos
June 09, 2011
Sam I was invited last month and paid u$250 for green fee plus u$100 for caddie (u$80 plus tip). You will have my review soon
Ian William Halliwell
Yes Cypress is possibly, nay probably the best course I have played. I have recently completed a Round the Word Extravaganza...... starting at Sngapore, Australia, New Zealand, Hawaii, Canada, California, Vegas, Florida, Bermuda, Spain and back to the UK..... Certainly drop dead sensational, shocked at 18th hole, pales next to Pebble and Koolau.... but views sensational, better than NSW, Kauri or Kidnappers or Pebble.... as good as but not significantly better. My main quibble remains exclusivity. I wanna play in the footsteps of my heroes not Carmel's millionaires. One of the greatest yes, the best maybe.
April 19, 2010
10 / 10
Reviewer Score:
TaylorMade

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John Garrett
I played CP in 2000 and they were kind enough to lend me some clubs. I wouldn't say they were old but the woods really were woods. We were a 4 ball and made up half of the course players on this pleasant Saturday afternoon. The course itself is a treasure meandering along the Pacific beach and past Clint's old house. The picture hole is the 16th par 3 over the pacific. I was playing with Jay Townsend and a couple of business colleagues. On the 16th Jay hit a two iron into the Pacific while my borrowed 3 wood gave up the ghost and broke in two. Jay then hit a driver to within 5 feet while my next effort was less dry. There was no visitors' shop, changing room, bar or restaurant. I adored the course, the stillness only broken by the waves crashing against the rocks.
January 19, 2010
8 / 10
Reviewer Score:
TaylorMade

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