Lindrick - Yorkshire - England

Lindrick Golf Club,
Deep Carrs Lane,
Lindrick,
South Yorkshire,
S81 8BH,
England


  • +44 (0) 1909 475282


Lindrick Golf Club is remembered passionately because it was here in 1957 that Great Britain beat the USA to win the Ryder Cup. Victory had been a long time coming; the last time the home team had defeated the dominant Americans was way back in 1933 at Southport & Ainsdale. After the 1957 Lindrick triumph, the Ryder Cup remained firmly in the grasp of the USA until 1985 when, at the Belfry, a combined team of GB&I and Europe managed to wrestle the cup from the Americans.

Lindrick Golf Club played host to the 1957 Ryder Cup matches between the USA and Great Britain. Team Captains were Jack Burke (US) and Dai Rees (GB). Yorkshire industrialist, Sir Stuart Goodwin, financed the British Team to the tune of £10,000 and the team selection process utilised a new points system. The result was a win for Britain despite a dominant American 3-1 lead in the foursomes. A 6 ½ to 1 ½ result in the singles was more than enough to seal the first British win in twenty-four years. GB 7 ½ - USA 4 ½. The Ryder Cup was played at Thunderbird in 1955 and at Eldorado in 1959.

Clearly, the Ryder Cup put Lindrick firmly on the golfing map, but the Sheffield and District Golf Club, as it was originally called, was actually founded in the 19th century, 1891 to be precise, when a course was laid out by Old Tom Morris and Robert Black ‘Buff’ Wilson. In 1894 another nine holes were added, with the direction of play reversed. Tom Dunn then made some improvements in 1897.

Harry Colt was next to be consulted, followed by new holes and a revised layout from Willie Park Junior in 1907-09.

Derek Markham commented as follows in A Matter of Course: The life of William Herbert Fowler 1856-1941: "Lindrick Golf Club had been one of Herbert Fowler's earliest clients, in 1907. On his advice, and that of Willie Park, the course had been extended to 6,010 yards. By the 1920s, further modifications were needed. Three holes required balls to be played over the main road which runs between Worksop and Sheffield, a feature which became increasingly unacceptable as motor traffic grew in density. Advice was sought from Fowler and Simpson, and changes were recommened which were implemented between 1923 and 1925. Minutes of the Lindrick club show a fee of thirty guineas."

A couple of years after this, Alister MacKenzie made further improvements and suggested many others. In more recent times, Fred Hawtree, Donald Steel, Cameron Sinclair and Ken Moodie have all altered the layout.

Lindrick Golf Club is laid out on prime common land and the excellent turf has a mixed heathland and moorland feel. It’s a wild but picturesque course with silver birch trees and gorse lining many of the fairways, which are generous and immaculately conditioned. The greens are subtly borrowed, lightning fast and well protected by bunkers. Accuracy, rather than length, is critical at Lindrick. We're perhaps stating the obvious here, but it's much more desirable to play from manicured fairways than dense rough.

There are a number of strong holes, especially on the back nine and the 4th, a short par five of 478 yards, is certainly fun and memorable, with a downhill drive and a blind approach to a hidden green, nestling in a hollow.

According to the writing of Bernard Darwin in his original article for the Times, At Hollinwell and Lindrick, which was reprinted for his book, Playing the Like, the “secret and engaging dell” in the area of the 4th green, once bordered three counties - “York, Notts and Derby – and so it was once the ideal spot for prize-fighting. If there was an obdurate magistrate on one side of the water there was probably a complaisant one on the other, and the ring could be reformed without much ado.”

In a more up-to-date publication, the 18th is featured in the 500 World’s Greatest Golf Holes, a 210-yard par three. It’s unusual to end with a par three and cruel to have such an exacting final tee shot, especially if the match is finely poised.

As with so many golf courses of this era, Lindrick, measuring a little over 6,600 yards, is simply not long enough to host today’s professional men’s tournaments. However, in 1966, it was the venue for the British Masters with Neil Coles emerging as the eventual winner and, in 1977, Vivien Saunders took the Women’s British Open crown. Greg Norman somehow took 14 strokes at Lindrick’s 17th, a par four,during the final round of the 1982 Martini tournament and then went on to win the British Masters by eight stokes at St Pierre a few weeks later.

During the winters of 2015 and 2016, Ken Moodie of Creative Golf Design was busy enhancing various features on the course, building new championship tees, introducing strategic fairway bunkers and reshaping numerous greenside bunkers, which resulted in changes to eleven holes in total.

It was recently discovered that Alister MacKenzie was involved in the construction of the course, working on the layout during 1912-13, when he designed five of the existing holes, including the iconic 18th. He also prepared a 16-page handwritten report on the course and many of his proposals were subsequently actioned.

Lindrick hosted the English Women's Amateur Championship in July 2017 (won by fifteen-year-old Lily May Humphreys), to add to an impressive list of professional and amateur tournaments it has hosted down the years, including both the Ryder Cup and the Curtis Cup.

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Reviews for Lindrick

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Description: Lindrick Golf Club is remembered passionately because it was here in 1957 that Great Britain beat the USA to win the Ryder Cup. Rating: 7.1 out of 10 Reviews: 31
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James Stephens

Lovely course. Very well maintained. Not long, so you have to plot your way around it. Some very interesting holes. I always enjoy play here. Definitely worth a visit.

September 05, 2021
6 / 10
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Jez

I'm a big fan of golf courses that have good views from the clubhouse over the 1st and 18th. Lindrick is a fine example of just this. The beautiful stone clubhouse sits upon a hill with the first hole a yard away from the professional shop. I love the way some courses manage to integrate the first hole into such close proximity with the clubhouse, it gives such a more communal feeling and a much better atmosphere.

The course itself is fantastic. There are unfortunately a fair few holes that will fade from memory quickly, apart from 4 and 5, the front nine, albeit incredibly kept, lacked the wow factor. This did change the minute I stepped on the tee of my favourite on the course, the 12th. Charming tight little dog leg left gave me that wow feeling I had been missing in parts on the front nine. And to be fair it did get better from there. 13 is a great golf hole to appreciate from the tee whilst 15 & 16 the best view comes from around the greens. A boundary stone wall on 15 and a quarry which you're able to play shots from (if you dare!) I'm not so sure about the claim of one of the top 500 golf holes in the world with the 18th. It's a fairly straightforward par 3, the views to the clubhouse on the hill are no doubt lovely but is it enough?

I feel as though the par 3's let Lindrick down slightly, competition in the top 100 is fierce and having been lucky enough to play a lot of courses sat with a similar ranking I think it does lack a par 3 you can sit back and really love.

What does set this place apart from some others with a similar ranking however is the condition. You can tell that it's a fairly quiet course with the lack of divots but these fairways were like carpets. I've not seen anything outside of Surrey as good yet. The condition of the bunkers were phenomenal as the greens which is a credit to the green staff (not that I saw one at all on my way round!)

All in all, Lindrick does fit comfortably in this top 100 list for me, the facilities and condition of the place you won't get much better but some of the holes do struggle to compete with courses in this region with a much higher ranking.

July 15, 2021
7 / 10
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Neil White

A nine-iron clip arrowed into the green on the second hole and, as my partner lined up a birdie putt, I mused on why it was rated as the sixth hardest on Lindrick's stroke index.

He nudged the ball and was only slightly off target but it ran and ran and ran. The next putt was too firm back up the hill, the third slid millimetres past and the fourth missed too.

The former Ryder Cup course had shown why we needed to be on our mettle.

Lindrick is not overly long and can be conquered - as some of the better scorers in its autumn open 4BBB proved - but we were unable to unlock the mysteries of its greens' pace or subtle changes of directions.

Nevertheless, this is a memorable track with every hole providing a very different challenge.

I am a fan of the quirky so a favourite was the much-heralded par-5 4th with a blind shot down a bank to a relatively small putting surface.

It is followed by the 5th, which has such a steep opening that there is a high mirror on the tee to see if the group in front are out of range. I have never seen the like before.

Fortunately, our driving was in good order because there is many a carry over gorse, often revelaing holes which are surrounded by bunkers.

The only hole without sand is the picturesque 12th but don't be fooled, it is easy to make a mess of (as I proved) with a dramatic dog-leg to the left down into a green whose entrance is reminiscent of links.

Indeed, there a few holes which reminded me of seaside golf - none more so than the 15th with humps in front of the green and a wall directly behind.

The 17th is another beauty, protected by more sand traps and the 18th is an ultra-testing par 3 which has caused debate by featuring in a best 500 holes in the world list and Peter Aliss's top 18.

I didn't think it stood out only because so many holes are memorable at Lindrick.

Then there is a clubhouse which oozes history of the famous 1957 Ryder Cup win and the club's current stars - Lee Westwood and Danny Willett.

Everything about our competition at Lindrick was a cut above, from the Open-style dressing of the 1st and 18th tees to the scoreboard which gave us a fleeting feeling of importance.

These touches added even more sparkle to a visit which demanded a return - when at least we will know what is coming on the devilish second green.

October 22, 2020
7 / 10
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Josh P

Set in the North Midlands- legend has it that the 4th green (more on that later) once had the borders of Yorkshire, Nottinghamshire and Derby all running through it. It is a Ryder Cup host, having hosted the 1957 edition, and is a solid heath/moorland layout.

There’s interesting bunkering and green complexes throughout, such as the 2nd green which is slanted from back to front. The 4th was my favourite hole here, a short par 5, where taking driver off the tee can bring in trouble in the form of bunkers and a bottlenecking fairway. It is the approach shot that makes this hole though, with the green set just behind a massively steep slope which means that run up shots will normally reach the green. There’s also a small open rock face on this slope (not too dissimilar to something you would expect to see at Arrowtown in New Zealand), meaning that you could get a very unlucky bounce. Next to the green in this hollow, is the 5th tee which offers a blind tee shot.

The 12th is a hole that can cause controversy. It’s over the road from the 11th, and has is the only hole at Lindrick with no bunkers. On first viewing, I thought that this hole was disappointing, and just didn’t seem in keeping with the rest of the course. However, on the second round of the day I felt I could understand the intricacies and angles better and enjoyed it much more. You only have to look at the brilliant Royal Ashdown Forest to see that bunkering isn’t everything.

15-16 was a good stretch. The short and blind par 4 15th has a hard approach shot with the green sloping away from you, and you do not want to be left on the 16th with your approach as you will end up in the quarry. A nice feature with the quarry was that it is completely playable out of there, there’s even steps to get you in and out. The 18th is a tough par 3, and it’s fun to have a different style of finishing hole.

Overall, I would have Lindrick somewhere in the middle of its not too distant neighbours, Sherwood Forest and Holinwell.

July 20, 2020
6 / 10
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Andy Cocker

I played Lindrick Golf Club on Monday of this week, with air heavy and the weather overcast, adding to the brooding feel you get as you play this high quality track.

Revised golf ball review upwards to 5, given that this is the best in the South Yorkshire/North Notts area and it oozes old school class from the moment you turn off the A57 and up the driveway.

Whilst this review is about the course it would be remiss of me not to mention the exceptional practice facilities. No wonder Danny Willett, Matt Fitzpatrick and Lee Westwood are members here. The driving range is mown like its a fairway and the bunker and short game area is exceptional. Plus there are 2 other practice areas within the course layout.

Turning to the course, each time I have played I have grown fonder of this track, maybe not at the level of Alwoodley and Ganton, but it does give Moortown a run for it's money.

Whilst not having dramatic vistas like Hollinwell, the course which is a mix of heathland and moorland laid out over sandy based turf, still delivers a punch.

Like a lot of heathland courses it's best defence is the wind which always seems to be in play.

The course makes a strong start from an elevated tee on the 1st and the onwards to the dog left left 2nd, one of my favourites, with strategic bunkering and well laid out green complex.

My playing partner, a member at Lindrick, feels that the course could be changed around a little to improve it's flow. he would remove the par 3 3rd and 6th and use the significant land which i understand the golf club owns adjacent to the course to make for a better routing. I can see where he was coming from, but I di like both par 3's.

The 4th, the 1st of the par 5's I would agree with him on that moving the tee so it's a little less of a sever dog left off the tee, would improve the view, but the rest of the hole where you play down to a sunken green which borders Notiinghamshire and Derbyshire is a strong hole.

Years ago the club had to remove a hole adjacent to the A57 and built a new one across the road, the 12th. I like this hole, a rare hole for me where a driver is not required on a par 4, but again the back tees cannot be used often to the closeness of a cattery next to it. Again the hole could be changed to open it up to bigger hitters, but a thinking mans hole is always welcome.

The course has a strong run of holes 7 -11 and then again 13 - 18, the highlights being the par 5 13th which simply looks good on the eye, the 14th which plays down to a sunken green in the far corner of the course with nice views across the countryside, the 17th where the bunkering in front and to the side of the green means accuracy is absolutely vital with your 2nd shot.

And that leaves the 18th - previous review I had said I wasn't a fan of par 3 finishes. And generally I am not. However I really took in the finish at Lindrick. Long at over 190 yards, into a wind but with the wonderful clubhouse overlooking the hole and banking behind which would have accommodated the fans who turned up to the Ryder Cup all those years ago, I realised that this was a special par 3. I duly stepped up to the occasion, reaching the green with my tee shot and then rolling in a birdie across the relatively slow, but incredibly true green.

I walked off a proud and happy man and reflected on what a quality track I had just been round. yes there are some areas where a bit of re routing may improve the overall layout, but the conditioning of the course, the attention to detail, the design of the bunkers, the quality of the greens, the overall old world class that oozed around the clubhouse, certainly elevates this course and its place as 4th best course in Yorkshire, and No1 in South Yorkshire on the Top 100 rankings, thoroughly justified.

July 02, 2020
8 / 10
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Andy Cocker

I’m going to start by being somewhat contentious. I do not like the 18th;not becauseI haven’t played it well, because I have each time I have played Lindrick, but more because I am not a fan of par 3 finishes generally, and when a course does end with one, I am looking for something special. I don’t believe that the long par 3 at Lindrick delivers that special quality. I know it’s in the Top 500 finishing holes in the world but I simply don’t get it.

Apart from that I love Lindrick. It’s overshadowed by it’s near Nottingham partners of Hollinwell, Sherwood and Coxmoor but it is a class ‘inland links’ with some fun and challenging holes.

Everyone loves the par 5 4th, which sweeps down from South Yorkshire to the Notts/Derbyshire boundary.

It cant be helped that the A57 cuts across the course but the 11th across the road is a lovely hole played down to a beautifully positioned green.

And then there is the 18th, which I am sure some of you will love but for me it leaves me feeling under whelmed after what has been a throughly enjoyable round of golf.

Check it out alongside Worksop (10 minutes away) and Rufford (30 minutes away) for a nice golfing weekend in North Notts/South Yorkshire

August 03, 2019
6 / 10
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Fergal O'Leary

I was really impressed with Lindrick and it packs plenty of punch to be among the very best in the county, and arguably an underrated course in the UK. I loved the short dog-leg left 2nd hole as the undulating fairway heaves its way up to the well protected green. The first par 3 on the course is at the 3rd hole which is surrounded by bunkers and plenty of brilliant pin positions. Wonderful movement and superb angles are strong architectural characteristics across the course, but the most notable aspect is how almost every hole feels like it’s created by itself. I was truly captured by each brilliant hole that the lack of sweeping views was essentially irrelevant.

The par 5 4th hole may be one of the most fascinating experiences. What feels like a benign tee shot without much definition other than a row of trees, quickly escalates into a magnificent experience towards a hugely sunken green. What a surprise, what a delight! The sense of mystery and blind intrigue is tremendous. The wind is in Lindrick’s sails and hurls you into the terribly difficult uphill 5th hole with a tight tee shot through a chute of trees, followed by an uphill left turn to a green that feels like an eternity away. A beautiful short 6th hole gives you a chance to steady your score before another string of outstanding par 4s all playing in different directions, including shorter holes that demand precision and deep thought on the tee box.

Until the 11th green, the routing is nicely together and intuitive. The walk to the 12th hole is a bit long where you go under the main road via a tunnel and enter onto a new paddock. The 12th hole is a lovely downhill par 4 where the firm ground asks for an approach shot landing 40 yards short of the nicely framed green – but the hole feels like it’s stuck away from the rest of the routing. The 13th is an absolute cracker. It’s bombs away off the tee to get past the numerous fairway bunkers to get the best angle into the steeply uphill approach. Once again, and consistently throughout, the angles at Lindrick are paramount to success. The sheer variety of the holes is outstanding as you move past the quarry and bring you to the closing and infamous par 3 closing hole that sits below the beautiful clubhouse.

Lindrick is without question a championship layout that asks so much of your game, examines your shot-making and brings you on a journey that will remain in your memory forever. It once again highlights how strong the golf is in England that doesn’t rely on the coastline.

July 04, 2019
8 / 10
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RM61

This was my first visit to Lindrick and although I was aware of its history (Hosting the 1957 Ryder Cup and the 1932 Curtis Cup) I knew little about the course itself. The course is a joy to Lindrick Golf Course - Photo by reviewer play with a mixture of left to right and right to left doglegs Lindrick tests your course management from the tee. It also has some great elevation changes such a the downhill second shot to hole 4 and the approach shot uphill to hole 13. The par threes are no pushover either with small raised greens which are well protected by bunkers and run off areas. Lindrick’s greens have some nice movement through them and although when I played they were not at their best they still rolled at a decent pace. As with many courses this year Lindrick’s fairways have suffered but I am sure with a little luck with the weather they will soon recover. If you want to play a classic heathland course Lindrick would be a great place to spend a day.

April 13, 2019
6 / 10
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Jim McCann

It was like returning to meet an old friend when I played at Lindrick last week – and I did indeed meet up with an old friend, club archivist Graham Mann – nearly three years after my last game here. Weekend tee times for visitors at most clubs are generally pretty scarce but when you have fewer than three hundred members on the books, there’s every chance of getting out on the course with little trouble in the afternoon.

Lindrick Golf Course - Photo by reviewer

Having recently admired the bunker renovation that architect Ken Moodie from Creative Golf Design has been involved in at West Surrey, I knew I wouldn’t be disappointed with similar work he was carrying out here and, sure enough, the ongoing upgrade of the sand hazards (and other course improvements such as adding tees and installing strategically positioned fairway mounding) looks very good indeed.

Lindrick’s one of the few courses in Great Britain & Ireland to have hosted both the Ryder Cup and Curtis Cup, and the English Women’s Amateur Championship was held here just a few months ago so the club is still regarded as a top venue for prestigious golf tournaments in the modern era. Another recent accolade to come Lindrick’s way was membership of the Alister MacKenzie Society of GB&I, having discovered the good doctor worked on the course during 1912-13.

The course was in great condition when I played, with the fairways in particular playing firm and fast. It’s hard to believe such underfoot conditions could exist out on the course when looking at the lush surrounding farmland but the gently undulating moorland/heathland terrain of Lindrick Common is actually a prime place to site an 18-hole layout – and once the current course improvement program is finished it’ll look even better.

Jim McCann

September 15, 2017
8 / 10
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Patrick McGarey

I played Lindrick on a calm April afternoon, after a morning round at nearby Notts. Lindrick is a classic British design, featuring several blind shots, Lindrick Golf Course - Photo by reviewer redan greens and other features sadly missing from more modern layouts. Course conditioning was excellent, with wonderful greens (firm, with true reads). The holes were routed through varied landscape, and included a number of memorable challenges (the blind approach par five #4 and the lengthy par three #18 are examples). While I'm happy to play these uncrowded courses before the touring golfing public "wakes up" to their quality, visiting Americans are crazy to miss playing classic English layouts like Lindricks, which has hosted both the '57 Ryder Cup and the Ladies Open.

May 02, 2017
8 / 10
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