Los Angeles (North) - California - USA

Los Angeles Country Club,
10101 Wilshire Blvd,
Los Angeles,
California (CA) 90024,
USA


  • +1 310 276 6104

  • Kirk O. Reese

  • Herbert Fowler, George C.Thomas Jnr., Gil Hanse

  • Jim Schaeffer


The Beverly Hills location for the Los Angeles Country Club makes it possibly one of the most valuable pieces of real estate in the world. It’s therefore fitting therefore that North course does full justice to the land because it is a truly magnificent layout.

The club was founded in 1897 as the Los Angeles Golf Club, moving locations three times before settling on its current Beverly Hills site in 1911. The original club founders, Joe Sartori and Ed Tufts, along with Norman Macbeth and Charles Orr, laid out the inaugural course at the new Wilshire site.

The course (now known as the North) at the renamed Los Angeles Country Club was refashioned by Herbert Fowler in 1921 but re-routed in 1927 by George C. Thomas Jr. and his right-hand man, William Bell, with excellent effect. Fast-forward to the new millennium when Gil Hanse was entrusted to return this classic course to its former glory.

The layout is at once thrilling and often exciting with its hills, ridges, swales and valleys. There are two 18-hole courses, the North and the South, if you can get a game, but only have time for one round, try and persuade your friendly member to play the North course.

There are far too many great holes to mention them all, but the par threes are exceptionally strong, exactingly long and noteworthy. The 7th is perhaps the toughest of them all, measuring almost 240 yards where only the perfect tee shot will find the sanctuary of the green. The 9th is perhaps the signature hole, with the clubhouse as the backdrop, but many members consider the 11th to be the star of the show with downtown LA as the backdrop.

As far as park courses go, Los Angeles North is as good as it comes. The course holds your interest all the way round and it’s a challenging and tough but fair layout. Roll this up with a beautiful setting (except perhaps for the odd imposing tower block) and you have a little piece of heaven.

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Reviews for Los Angeles (North)

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Description: The Beverly Hills​ location for the Los Angeles Country Club makes it possibly one of the most valuable pieces of real estate in the world. It’s therefore fitting therefore that North course does full justice to the land... Rating: 5.7 out of 6 Reviews: 11

I was fortunate to play this course a number of times during my time in LA. It is a stunning course in quite exceptional condition, with a clubhouse ambience that is the epitome of US country club excellence, all the more remarkable when one considers its situation in the middle of downtown LA and with the South course to accompany it. Any chance to play there should be grabbed with both hands. It is truly outstanding.

6 / 6
Los Angeles (North)
November 11, 2018


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George Thomas’s famous quote “The strategy of the golf course is the soul of the game” shows splendidly in his design at LA North. Thomas had just finished his work at Riviera and Bel-Air and many think his finest work was done here. The fairways are wide, but on almost every hole (the 2nd and 13th are the only exceptions) the golfer has options to consider on which part of the fairway provides the most advantageous angle for the next shot. And while bunkers front half the greens, on most of the rest (1st, 5th, 8th, 11th, 13th and 15th), there’s a kickpad to one side of the green allowing the option of a running approach. Another common feature is the horseshoe green, where a bunker cuts into the center of the green pad and two peninsulas of green flank the bunker. On most of these (3rd, 12th, 14th) Thomas sited the peninsulas closest to the fairway, though at the 15th, he rotated the green 90 degrees.

One might wonder how stout a defense a course of this age will provide when the USGA holds its national championship here in 2023. One source of defense will be the par 3 holes, two of which can be played at well over 250 yards. The aforementioned 15th will also provide a challenge, despite the fact that it will likely be set up at under 100 yards at least one of the days—as it was for the 2017 Walker Cup. The world’s top amateurs had plenty of trouble finding the tiny corner of the green where the hole was cut.

6 / 6
Los Angeles (North)
January 09, 2018


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I was a walking scorer for the 2017 Walker Cup - so inside the ropes for two rounds watching the top amateurs attack the course. And these young bombers in match play could go at it hard. I doubt the pros in the US Open will be so brazen in the use of the driver and some of the lines taken. But what fun to watch! And I am sure the USGA was watching closely what modifications can still be made in the setup to challenge the top players. Clearly this was a dress rehearsal.

To me, I most enjoyed the challenges posed on #2, #7, and #11.

All of the accolades in the other reviews are completely valid; it is truly magnificent oasis within the confines of a major city.

6 / 6
Los Angeles (North)
January 05, 2018


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LACC North, future home to the US Open and the benefactor of a wonderful renovation by Gil Hanse not all too long ago was a recent stop on my West Coast tour. Wow, to find such an amazing course nestled right in between Beverley Hills and Santa Monica, right off Wilshire Boulevard, one of America’s busiest roads, is surreal to say the least. The land here is literally ideal for golf, full of cool natural features for a talented architect to wind and weave a golf course through. The property is very hilly and full of dry washes that have been strategically used to challenge the golfer. Greens are very undulated and contain multiple challenging pin positions. There is a great mix of holes from reachable par 4’s and 5’s to 3’s that take all you have in the bag. The course is characterized by fairly generous playing corridors with generous amounts of playable short grass. Don’t let that fool you into a false sense of security, take the less than ideal line for the days pin position and you will need a perfect shot to avoid trouble and be safely on the dance floor.

The North Course is one that will challenge every aspect of your game and has the ability of forcing you to run up a huge score on every hole, there really is no letting up and while loads of fun, requires 18 holes of focus in the hot California sun.

18 great holes that are all completely different makes it really tough to pull out clear favorites yet if I were forced to choose the short drivable par 4, 5th hole would be one of mine. This hole plays from an elevated tee to a tricky green fronted with a menacing moon shaped dry wash. The tee shot is blind if you are going for the green and also has a slight dogleg right. The green also has a bit of a ¼ moon shape a ridge running through it with a clear plateau for our pin position of the day making all chips or approached from off the green extremely delicate. The safest miss would be short right but this shot is very tough to estimate from the tee given the blind tee shot. Too far right is a lost ball.

Another great hole is the par 3 11th. Designed with reverse redan qualities perhaps the idea shot is just short and left allowed the ball to release from left to right and run down to the pin. The hole plays as far back as 240 yds from the back tees. Front and right are treacherous deep bunkers. The hole also plays slightly down hill. Just add a nice little breeze and this hole simply requires extremely solid play to walk off with a 3.

Notable is the restored short alternative hole 17. A little flip of a wedge into an extremely narrow, heavily back to front sloping green. This hole clearly shows that even very short holes can provide knee knocking tee shots.

LACC North is plain and simply a wonderful experience, easily worthy of an overseas flight for the opportunity to play it. A pure masterpiece by Thomas that Hanse has thoughtfully renovated new life back into.

6 / 6
Los Angeles (North)
November 30, 2016


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To paraphrase Cecil Rhodes's comment about the English, "To be a member of L.A.C.C. is to win first prize in the lottery of life." As Gil Hanse and Geoff Shackelford wrote in the L.A.C.C. North Course Commemorative Edition, published in 2010: "Every great course in the world features at least one par-4 under 350 yards allowing for multiple playing options. Designed with an eye toward risk and reward, these devilish little two-shotters accomplish one very simple axiom, as so eloquently written by George Thomas in Golf Architecture in America: “The strategy of golf is the thing which gives the short accurate player a chance with a longer hitter who cannot control his direction or distance.”

Riviera's great par four under 350 yards is its tenth. At L.A.C.C. it is the sixth, and it's a doozy. The hole plays 335 yards from the back tees, and you hit into a narrow valley where the ball will naturally kick right to left. If you are brazen, you can attempt to cut off the corner on the right and incur a big penalty if you miss. The hole doglegs sharply to the right and the approach to the elevated green is made quite tricky because it is such a small target. It is the type of hole you could play dozens and dozens of times and still find exhilarating and challenging each time.

Routing, variety and terrain combine to make the North a world-class course. Given its geographic location, L.A.C.C. North will inevitably be compared with nearby Riviera. In my view L.A.C.C. is the superior course. Thomas simply had a better piece of land to work with at L.A.C.C. than at Riviera. Riviera is built within a valley and doesn't have the elevation changes or other elements that makes L.A.C.C. so unique.

John Sabino is the author of How to Play the World’s Most Exclusive Golf Clubs

5 / 6
Los Angeles (North)
November 14, 2016


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LACC sits on a very expensive piece of real estate – it wouldn’t surprise me if its land is the most valuable of any golf course in the U.S. It is surrounded by Century City, Beverly Hills, and Holmby Hills. Its address is 10101 Wilshire Boulevard. To those that know their way around L.A., that says it all. But as soon as you pull into the club, the hustle and bustle of L.A. quickly disappears.

Two interesting details about LACC: We walked and took caddies. At the 4th hole, the caddie said, “See that wall? That’s the backyard wall to the Playboy Mansion.” Even I thought about boosting myself up on that wall to see what eye candy might lie on the other side, but it was a bit high for that, and the caddies said the wall has electric wires on the top. Once, as a practical joke, they convinced a new caddie to let them give him a boost to look over the wall. When his hand reached the top, he got a big shock and was pissed at those guys for rest of the day.

Near Number 14 (a par 5 of 528 yards) was the home of famous TV producer Aaron Spelling. It ran the length of the fairway (more than 500 yards), and makes the LACC clubhouse look like a guesthouse. Larry Berle.
5 / 6
Los Angeles (North)
October 19, 2014


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Response
Keith Baxter
October 19, 2014
The above review is an edited extract from A Golfer’s Dream, which has been reproduced with the author’s kind permission. A Golfer’s Dream, by Larry Berle, tells the story of how a regular guy conquered America’s Top 100 Golf Courses (following Golf Digest’s 2001/2002 list). Larry has exclusively rated for us every course in the hundred, using our golf ball rating system. However, Larry did not rate the 100 courses against every golf course he has played, but instead he rated them in relation to each other within the hundred. Consequently, in some cases, his rating may seem rather low. A Golfer’s Dream is available in Kindle format and also on Kindle Unlimited via Amazon... click the link for more. 
As part of the glorious restoration, Gil Hanse retained Geoff Shackleford, the author of George Thomas’ biography “The Captain”, to provide historical background regarding George Thomas’ and William Bell’s design concepts. Geoff assisted Gil as he perfected his architectural plans as well as during the actual construction. The fairways were constructed during the winter and spring of 2009. Gil is extraordinarily hands-on and always wanted to be onsite as much as possible to drive the bulldozers and craft the bunkers. The first bunker excavated during the 2009 phase was the second fairway bunker on the 17th hole that had been constructed as part of Herbert Fowler’s design in 1920-21. Much to the delight of Gil, who was operating the bulldozer, a cache of sand was discovered under the topsoil, signaling success in locating the original bunker. During 2009, fairway lines were established to compliment the new bunkering, and tree removal commenced, open up some lost vistas on the course and further revealing Gil’s vision for the North Course. It was during this interlude that the Board decided to pursue Gil’s design that called for re-establishing the original routing of the 2nd and 8th holes. The 2010 phase of the project began with the construction of the 5th green complex, followed by restoration of the short par four 6th green complex, the alter ego to Riviera’s famed 10th hole design by Captain Thomas several years before his work on the North Course.

After work concluded in the lower course (the 2nd through 9th holes, and the 17th hole), the construction effort shifted to the upper holes where tree removal exposed sweeping vistas not only across the differing elevations of the course itself, but also across the Los Angeles basin. Views from Los Angeles (North) Golf Course - Photo by Andy Newmarch11th, 12th, 13th, 14th, 15th and 16th holes span the Santa Monica Mountains, Griffith Observatory and the downtown skyline. One of the last initiatives of Gil Hanse was an ode to architect George Thomas to re-establish the old 17th, a short par three that played a key role in the final round of the 1926 LA Open. This hole, designed by Herbert Fowler and built by the Captain in 1920, was coined the “105 yard terror”. Fortunately the site remained untouched until 2010, except for the trees and brush growing upon it, so it was not difficult to rebuild the green to its original contours. Although not part of the regular course set up, this hole is often used by the membership as the 19th hole to settle up those precious bets. Unlike other courses in the area, the hybrid-Bermuda grass seed in the fairways provided for excellent turf conditions and played firm and fast throughout. With Gill adding many natural barrancas in front of greens, and hand-crafting bunkers that jut into the greens creating putting surfaces that resemble the shape of a molar tooth, it’s a real challenge to hit greens in regulation.

The restoration of the North Course took me by surprise. I hardly recognized the layout with all the tree clearance, incredible change in the bunker design and playing to new green locations. The current bunkers at LACC don’t resemble the bunkering at the other nearby Thomas layouts. Upon reflection, I considered the North Course almost unplayable for high handicap golfers as the entrance to every green is guarded by punishing bunkers, eliminating the ability to run the ball into the green. The current layout has turned many of the par fours into three shot holes for average players or individuals who can’t hit it very far. With the Walker Cup being hosted at this historic venue in 2017, the club will be well prepared for its first major showing of modern times as it rarely opens its doors to public eyes. Of all the courses on my itinerary, this was the toughest test.
5 / 6
Los Angeles (North)
December 09, 2013


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Playing any of the courses ranked in the World Top 100 is always a treat and my game on the North at LACC was no. 33 on the current list for me. The all American country club feel is evident on arrival and endorsed as you move through the locker room, the bar and grill, the pro-shop and then the starters hut – you are getting set-up for a great experience.



The opening hole like many great courses gets you moving away from the clubhouse quickly without having to be the most testing – take a par-5 and move on as it soon gets tough. There have been many changes to the course since 2009, all of these can been seen on the club website and there are plenty of before and after images – every hole has been improved without a doubt.Los Angeles Golf Course - Photo by reviewer



The 4th is the first par-3 and a beauty with the return of a sandy hazard short of the green and improved aesthetics all around. The 6th is a stand-out hole for me, one of those under 350 yard par-4’s that is unforgettable. It is certainly drivable but at what cost? The sensible play is straight for about 220 yards, leaving a 90 yard pitch to a raised thin green with bunkers front and back, best hole on the front nine. The back nine opens with a par-4 around 400 yards with a tricky approach to another great bunkered green-site. Hole 11, another par-3 but yet again no giveaway par to be had here – tip is to keep the tee shot left and it should feed to the green.



I have not really mentioned the greens yet; here goes… true, very very fast, subtle borrows and have a habit of making you look as though you have not got a clue! The 13th is a long par 4, around 420 yards and my excitement increased when the members I played with told me the Playboy Mansion is behind the hedge to the left of the green, a good looking hole indeed! The last par-3 comes at the 15th and is the shortest at around 140 yards played to a diagonally sited green – the green also has the ‘bump’ in the middle, which is believed to have originally been a bunker in the 1920’s – the club putting green also has the ‘bump’ which allows the members to practise the putt they may face on the great 15th green. All great courses have a strong 17th hole and the LACC has a very special hole indeed, a tough par-4 with bunkers at landing point down the left-side and trees and a ditch down the right – cross bunkers short of the green add to the look and difficulty of the approach. The drive at the last is not too tricky but the right-side is favourable – the shot and the walk to the green is a great experience, the clubhouse is so inviting to look at and the feeling of being in there in around ten minutes to reflect on one of the great golf experiences is very satisfying.



The North Course is certainly worthy of the world ranking. The club history document is well worth a read - https://www.thelacc.org/history

6 / 6
Los Angeles (North)
May 05, 2012


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One of the great restorations in America. It's a fantastic course, I rate it 3rd best in the state. The restoration should be a case study on how to restore a classic course. Too many holes to mention, but the 2nd and 8th are fantastic and the back nine to superb.
6 / 6
Los Angeles (North)
March 02, 2012


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After the revisions completed last year this is now even better! Gil Hanse did a wonderful job creating some new shots and creating excitement around the greens. The course looks great with the new bunkering and mowing style. This a buried beneath a lot of mediocre courses on this list, LACC has been reborn. Just wait 'til the walker cup if you aren't lucky enough to play it. It belongs amongst the best of the best courses in the country.
6 / 6
Los Angeles (North)
October 27, 2011


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