St Andrews (Old) - Fife - Scotland

St Andrews Links,
Pilmour House,
St Andrews,
Fife,
KY16 9SF,
Scotland


  • +44 (0) 1334 466666

  • Golf Club Website

  • St Andrews Links - follow signs to West Sands

  • Book well in advance - by ballot


Visit Golfbreaks.com for a golf holiday at St Andrews


The Old course at "The Home of Golf" in St Andrews has staged 29 Open Championships, that's more than any other course on the rotation.

Date Winner Country
1873 Tom Kidd Scotland
1876 Bob Martin Scotland
1879 Jamie Anderson Scotland
1882 Bob Ferguson Scotland
1885 Bob Martin Scotland
1888 Jack Burns Scotland
1891 Hugh Kirkaldy Scotland
1895 John H.Taylor England
1900 John H.Taylor England
1905 James Braid Scotland
1910 James Braid Scotland
1921 Jock Hutchison USA
1927 Bobby Jones USA
1933 Denny Shute USA
1939 Dick Burton England
1946 Sam Snead USA
1955 Peter Thomson Australia
1957 Bobby Locke S Africa
1960 Kel Nagle Australia
1964 Tony Lema USA
1970 Jack Nicklaus USA
1978 Jack Nicklaus USA
1984 Seve Ballesteros Spain
1990 Nick Faldo England
1995 John Daly USA
2000 Tiger Woods USA
2005 Tiger Woods USA
2010 Louis Oosthuizen S Africa
2015 Zach Johnson USA

Rarely is the Old course ranked outside the top ten because it’s a very special links, designed by Mother Nature. Surely there is little left to write about St Andrews; the spiritual home of golf, the world’s most famous links course, the mother of golf and so on. It is probable that golf was played here way back in the 12th century; what is certain is that the Old course is one of the oldest golf courses in the world.

In 1553, the Archbishop of St Andrews administered confirmation, at last allowing the community to play golf over the links. The Society of St Andrews Golfers was formed in 1754 and ten years later the course was reduced from its original 22 holes to 18. In 1834, William IV bestowed royal patronage on the club and The Society then changed their name to the Royal and Ancient Golf Club, the world’s oldest surviving “Royal” golf club. Sadly, the first royal club, Royal Perth, is no longer in existence, though in 1937, Royal Perth was born again, this time in Australia. Significantly, Ladies’ golf began at St Andrews; the world’s first ladies golf club was founded here in 1867. Royal North Devon’s ladies club was formed one year later.

"There are those who do not like the golf at St Andrews," wrote Bernard Darwin in his 1910 book, The Golf Courses of the British Isles, "and they will no doubt deny any charm to the links themselves, but there must surely be none who will deny a charm to the place as a whole. It may be immoral, but it is delightful to see a whole town given up to golf; to see the butcher and the baker and the candlestick maker shouldering his clubs as soon as his day's work is done and making a dash for the links."

The St Andrews Old course itself usually isn’t an instant hit, it’s a golf course you have to get to know and love. First timers might be somewhat disappointed. It's also unlikely that the Old course will feel familiar when you play it for the first time (except perhaps the 1st, 17th and 18th). Television pictures tend to make the ground look very flat, but the humps, hollows and ripples in the fairways are much deeper when you get out onto the course, as indeed are the pot bunkers. Dr Alister MacKenzie wrote in his book, The Spirit of St Andrews: “A good golf course is like good music or anything else: it is not necessarily a course which appeals the first time one plays over it; but one which grows on a player the more frequently he visits it.”

In Tom Doak’s Little Red Book of Golf Course Architecture, the author goes a long way towards explaining why the Old course isn’t an instant hit:

“The Old Course would never receive the acclaim it has today if we hadn’t been told for eons how great it is. It is the great golf course that the most players tend to dismiss as overrated after their first round – of course, that has something to do with its fame too. But it seems to me that the two reasons for it are simple: 1) most tourists don’t get to see the most interesting hole locations, which are reserved for important events, and 2) golfers can’t make out the strategies of the holes because the features are so difficult to see.”

However, it goes without saying that every golfer should play this course at least once, preferably multiple times. It sends shivers down the spine when the starter announces your name, setting those first tee nerves jangling. Oozing familiarity with names like the Swilcan Burn, the bridge over the burn—thought to have been built by the Romans—and the Valley of Sin. There are many memorable holes on the Old course, but one in particular, the 17th, the Road hole, is probably the most famous hole in the world.

And a word about the greens: they are the most extraordinary and interesting putting surfaces in the world. There is little definition between where the fairway, fringe and green stops or starts and the fairways are probably faster and certainly more undulating than the average golf club’s greens. And the size of them is absolutely staggering—they are gigantic—occupying more than an acre in some cases. When you are on the green, forget about having the pin tended—take a pair of binoculars instead.

Mother Nature was largely the architect of the Old course, but some credit must be given to Allan Robertson. In 1848, he widened fairways, created the now-famous gigantic double greens and built the infamous Road Hole green. Robertson's protégé, Old Tom Morris, also made further revisions to the Old course down the years.

"If I could be certain that everyone were intimately acquainted with the Old Course at St Andrews," wrote Tom Simpson, "my task, in saying what constitutes a good golf course would be a very simple one. I should just say St Andrews and leave it at that."

So, get yourself in the ballot and keep your fingers crossed. You will definitely remember the Old course experience for the rest of your life. And did you know that St Andrews Links has become the first Open Championship venue to achieve the prestigious GEO Certified ecolabel?

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Reviews for St Andrews (Old)

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Description: No other course has hosted more Opens than the Old Course at St Andrews. Its 29th Open and the 144th Open Championship returned “to the Home of Golf” in 2015. Rating: 8.9 out of 10 Reviews: 121
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Javier Pintos

It was my third time with the Auld Lady and definitely it was very different from the other two. On 2011 & 2012 I led a 32 golfers group with a guaranteed tee time know since long before the trip. But this time I was again leading a group but was not scheduled to play and as the trip was going on my chances were really very small. But the night before everything was set for the 12 customers so there was a window for a round. The thing is that I had no tee time and my only chance was to do the queue at 5am and that I only could play after 2pm. Once my turn came I got into the waiting list in the 16th position which was pretty good but my chances came down as I could not tee off before 2pm. Once my customers started their rounds a spot appeared but very strangely 3 R&A Members didn't show and as there was only 1 player ready we played in a St Andrews (Old) Golf Course - Photo by reviewertwosome!!! This is sort of strange as there were not less than 35 people at the Old Pavillion at 6am and nobody was ready to tee off! So at 2pm sharp we started our round.

I feel that most of the readers of the reviews will have played the course or will be familiar with it, so there is no sense on detailing every hole (I feel I did it in my previous two reviews). It will also not be important how I played, although it will be nice to share I birdied 18th from 8 feet to make it an unbelievable end of the round, and scoring was decent despite tough conditions from 12th to 18th and a very disappointing double on 17th.

I feel this time the review should tee some new things found playing the course for the third time, not only spots or features of the course but also details that happen before or during the round and that have maybe changed since my round in 2012.

The first thing I noticed different is there is a nice lady on the first tee who welcomes you with a nice speech about what the Old Course means and how you should run your round. A bottle of water branded which I kept as a memory (empty of course!) and off to the course. I have to say I was again afraid to missing the ball!!!! This won't change every time you play the round, it is real pressure.

St Andrews (Old) Golf Course - Photo by reviewer

I played it with the same wind of 2012 which is downwind from 2 to 7 and again as everybody say danger is on the right, anything left will be safe. What I noticed is that with this wind holding the approach shots is difficult so you will always need to land the ball short and let her roll but it is tough to accomplish as we are used to hit high shots directly to the hole.

The other new thing from 2012 is that great food truck on 9th green which is very different from the small table they had some years ago. And a hot soup plus hot dog were very necessary to battle the cold and light rain.

In 2011 I was playing one of my best rounds ever and tripled 13th, bogeyed it on 2012 and finally could get my par this time holing a 30 footed putter. But it is not about me, it is about in my opinion the most underrated hole on the course which is not only great but also very tough into the wind. It is the toughest on the course together with 17th.

And about the Road Hole, into the wind it is a monster as in 2012 we could not get home in two shots. This time I had some moments to hit a shot from the road bunker and from the road, which I could not do in my previous visits. And 18th will always be a special moment: the driver, the bridge, the walk and shaking hands with your playing partners after more than a round of golf, a true golfer's experience.

The last new thing I saw as it was my first time on town on a Sunday is the course being a public park, everybody walking it and taking pictures with their families or dogs but also taking deep care of the course. It was nice.

My last thought is to tell you this is a must, not only because it is a great course but as a piece of history every golfer deserves to play it at least once. I am lucky enough to have played it 3 times already and will go back many more. And it always will be as special as the first time.

August 17, 2016
10 / 10
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Vince Siy

It's like playing in the middle of town. The walk paths are filled with locals, tourists, and the occasional vehicle. If it's your first time, you will definitely need a caddy. Most of the greens are shared and some holes criss-cross each other. The scorecard yardage doesn't seem like much, but the strong wind and clever design make up for it. Fairways are hard and tight, and the bunkers deep and treacherous. Good course management is a must for maximum enjoyment. It was our first time playing the Old Course and we thoroughly enjoyed the entire experience.

Tip: You can hit it left all the way home. Most of the trouble is on the right.

July 08, 2016
10 / 10
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Patrick Desmond
This is the paramount course on the planet according to Bobby Jones. Why? It is for so many reasons. If I could summarise it would be that the course is very enjoyable and easy to play but very difficult to score on. For example the opening hole is a doddle, no rough in play, short, and then a flick over the Swilcan Burn and a two putt. The 18th hole opposite is similarly easy and short - this time over the famous Swilcan Bridge head on to the ‘valley of sin’. But so many players struggle to get a good result on these holes. One wonders what causes the difficulty. Is it the history or the Town or the R&A looking at you or the casual spectators who can get very close to the 17th and 18th green on any day? As you travel out and back through the hockey stick design you must weave past the famous bunkers many which are cruelly named. How can you miss the massive double greens from here on? Some shots look intimidating from the tee and you are tempted to bail out/play safe or go for the hero shot. If it works out great if not enjoy the challenge of getting out of the coffin or hell bunkers. Utterly enjoyable whilst steeped in history.
January 28, 2016
10 / 10
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pkkenny
Well, 2nd time around I really got it. This is the best and most mystifying course in the world. Read Alistair McKenzie's book 'Spirit of St Andrews' before playing.No other words required.
January 24, 2016
10 / 10
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paulofchester
Ok, let's not muck around here, if you love golf, I mean have a real passion for the game and its history, this is the one course you MUST play. The experience of standing on the first tee, knowing that EVERY great golfer who ever lived has stood there as well is spine tingling. And it simply gets better, with each hole offering great variety. I managed to go an entire round without finding one bunker, which, considering how many there are and that you can't see most of them, that was something amazing. I can also report that a simple twenty yard chip to the 17th is the scariest shot in golf. Even the simple last back into town I stunning.St Andrews the town is also worth the visit. Full of history.This is the best experience in golf, just make sure you take the whole experience in, because it seems to go too fast and then it is over.
September 29, 2015
10 / 10
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alejandro
El mejor campo de golf que he jugado. Sus hoyos son supremos. Pararse en los tees del 1 y del 18 para pegar adentro del pueblo de St. Andrews no se compara con ningún otro campo del mundo. Es muy importante la elección del palo en cada tee de salida ya que es un campo que requiere utilizar el palo justo, equivocarse de palo es muy costoso y como hay muchos bunkers que no se ven desde el tee de salida, es conveniente llevar un muy buen caddie, no basta con el yardas book.
April 05, 2015
10 / 10
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Keith Baxter
April 07, 2015
Roughly translated... The best golf course I've ever played. The holes are supreme. Standing on tees 1 and 18 within the town of St. Andrews is not compared with any other course in the world. It is very important to choose the right club on each tee as it is a course that requires using the right club, the wrong club is very expensive as there are many bunkers that are not visible from the tee. You should take a very good caddy not just the yardage book.
David Worley
I do not think there are any weak holes on the Old Course and the 1st, 11th, 16th and 17th holes are the standout ones for me. In places it can get a little confusing as to just where you are meant to be headed. For example, the par four 7th plays into the right side of a double green whilst the par three 11th crosses from the right side of the 7th fairway to the left side of the same double green.

The 5th hole, the first par five, encapsulates many of the features of the Old Course. Gorse is ever present down the right and the fairway is littered with bunkers, any one of which can be the ruin of a round. No less than seven bunkers on the right side of this fairway between 240 and 300 yards from the tee. When you reach the green you encounter one of the largest in the world, about one acre in size, joined with the 13th.

The Road Hole, 17th, is one of the great par fours and has influenced the result of many an event at the Old Course. When you first play this hole, there are two things that stand out. First, the dog leg right is much greater than you realize. The second surprise is just how high the green is above the road. It is much harder to chip from the road or the grass near the wall than appears the case when viewing this green on television.

Links land is often public and frequently has to provide access to the beach for the locals and visitors alike. The Old Course has a pathway, now sealed with bitumen, known as Granny Clark’s Wynd, which runs across the 1st and 18th fairways. It never ceases to amaze me how many people (presumably non golfers) casually stroll across here without the slightest thought of looking to see if anyone is on the 1st or 18th tee.

This review is an edited extract from Another Journey through the Links, which has been reproduced with David Worley’s kind permission. The author has exclusively rated for us every Scottish course that he played and featured in his book. Another Journey through the Links is available for Australian buyers via www.golfbooks.com.au and through Amazon for buyers from other countries.
March 25, 2015
10 / 10
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chris carwie
It is everything they say it is. From the first tee where you literally have a 500 yard wide shot to the junction of 9-11 with the mass confusion of shots going everywhere to the blind shot on 17, this is as much fun as you can have playing golf. Playing it without a caddie is silly. If you can afford the green fee, then you simply have to take the caddie as well. They make the round so much more enjoyable and save countless strokes just knowing what club not to hit. I can't say that I have played a better course and have been lucky enough to play 10 in Golf Digest top 30, including #1, #5, and this one. Take the pilgrimage, pay the exorbitant fee, and play it. Final tip: If you buy a sandwich, watch out for the damn seagulls.
June 17, 2014
10 / 10
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Philip Runkel
Played on April 30, 2014. I enjoyed the Old Course as much as I could, considering that we played almost the entire round in a steady downpour, at best, and, at worst, SLEET in a 30 mph wind -- i.e., sideways sleet! While I stayed dry and mostly warm in my rainproof wear, etc., it did not make for an enjoyable day and I probably enjoyed more than almost every else in my group. We quickly adopted a survival mindset and that does not allow for much enjoyment in the view and reflecting on the history, etc. I shot a 90, which I am pleased with given the difficulty of the course, it was my first time playing it and, of course, the conditions. Conditioning was great and the greens were in great shape. I definitely want to play again in better conditions!13 Index
May 07, 2014
8 / 10
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Andy
Just come back from playing the Old Course for the first time. We got there at 3.30pm for a 4.30pm tee time. Never having been there before we were slightly underwhelmed by the clubhouse and general golf attractions. Where was the champions board and the old style locker room (unless we missed them).But, once we paid our fee and had a conversation with the starter the excitement was incredible. The starter was great, giving good tips and taking our photos on the first tee.The first tee can look like hitting off into a vast field but it's the sense of occasion that gets you. And to crash a drive straight down the 1st fairway is a feeling that I'm not sure will be beaten.From then on the course is on a different level. The wind was absolutely fierce, swirling and gusting. It was hard to judge the wind but it was at least a 2-3 club wind making the course very very tough. And despite being a hard challenge it's an unbelievable course, undulating and rocking all over the place. The greens were difficult to judge because of the wind but were very true.The only downside was when one of our four ball had a mare in one of the pot bunkers slowing us down by 5 minutes, a Marshall appeared out of nowhere to subtlety tell us to keep up with the group in front. Having paid £155 for the round I didn't need someone to remind us that we need to keep up (we went round in 4 hours 15 minutes on a course we'd never played before).Overall we got lucky in that we had fantastic weather, the sun was shining, the course was fantastic. I would definitely do it again, it was a brilliant experience, walking in the footsteps of legends, playing the same holes as Woods etc and finishing off by lashing a drive down the middle of the 18th, does it get any better?
June 15, 2013
10 / 10
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JB
April 18, 2015
Really ?? You'll find the Champions Board in the R&A so "no" you did not miss it. And marshals are a very important part of everybody's enjoyment not just yours. 4.15 far too long I'm afraid.