Tain - North Scotland - Scotland

Tain Golf Club,
Chapel Road,
Tain,
Ross-shire,
IV19 1JE,
Scotland


  • +44 (0) 1862 892314

The origin of the name Tain is unclear, but what is certain is that in 1066, King Malcolm III granted the very first charter to Tain, making it the oldest Royal Burgh (borough) in Scotland. With panoramic views across the Dornoch Firth, Tain's Highland setting is dramatic and also pleasantly sheltered with the estuary on one side and the mountains of Easter Ross on the other.

Tain Golf Club was founded in 1890 and Old Tom Morris was commissioned to design the course. After a detailed survey of the land, Old Tom found only 15 suitable green sites and the course opened with only 15 holes. Some years later, John Sutherland revised the layout, but Old Tom's mark is still indelibly etched and there are eleven of Old Tom's green sites in use today.

Today's Tain is a full, sporting 18-hole layout, which measures 6,404 yards from the medal tees, where accuracy rather than length is essential. The nature of Tain is a combination of links and heathland and there are a number of forced carries across tangly heather to rumpled fairways, which are edged by dense gorse (stunning in full bloom).

The Aldie Burn meanders through the par four 2nd, which is called "River" and measures 391 yards from the back tees. The cozened fairway is punctuated by a ridge which falls away towards the artful burn which waits to trap the under-hit approach shot. We meet the "Alps" at the par four 11th, which requires a confident but blind approach shot over two sentry dunes in order to find the hidden green nestled beyond. Two great par threes at 16 and 17 bring us close to home and they are both strong single shot holes where the wily burn returns, waiting to catch the errant tee shot.

Tain will always remain in the shadow of its illustrious neighbour, Royal Dornoch, which lies on the opposite bank of the Dornoch Firth. But whatever you do, don't pass Tain by. There is variety and fun to be had on this challenging course. Heaven forbid, if the golf is not sufficiently celebrated to capture your attention, then surely a nip of malt at the local Glenmorangie Distillery will provide the ultimate temptation.

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Reviews for Tain

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Description: Overlooking the Dornoch Firth, Tain Golf Club arguably offers one of the best settings imaginable in the highlands for a round of golf. With sea on one side and the backdrop of the mountains behind. Rating: 6.7 out of 10 Reviews: 31
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Ed Battye

Tain Golf Club, founded in 1890 and originally laid out by Old Tom Morris, is a captivating moorland-links course that delivers a number of very fine holes and should be an essential play for any golfer travelling to The Highlands.

As well as being a superb test of golfing skills it is also one of the most picturesque courses I have ever played with vibrant purple and green colours framing virtually all of the holes.

I suspect you could also add golden-yellow to that when played in late spring with the gorse in full bloom. Tain really is a delightful place to play golf.

Two flat fairways – the first and 18th –are visible from the clubhouse and may not set the pulse racing but everything in-between the opening drive and closing approach is of real interest and of a very high quality. It will therefore come as no surprise the club proudly hosted the Scottish Ladies Amateur Championship in 2012.

Tain isn’t a classic links in the respect that you play close to the sea for the most part, nor is there rugged duneland, but the more inland feel represents a refreshing change in an area that is jam packed with great links golf. Adding Tain to your itinerary would be highly recommended. It’s impossible not to be impressed, I certainly was.

Ed is the founder of Golf Empire – click the link to read his full review.

March 29, 2017
6 / 10
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Martin Jordan

It had been 12 years since my last visit to Tain, en route to a gents open the following day at Dornoch. Since then I had retained a fondness for the course, there is always something alluring and beguiling about the Scottish Highlands in the sunshine, and it was always on my "I must go back one day" list. In truth, I didn’t remember a lot about the course with the exception of the fence and the road that fronts the first green and the glorious 11th hole called ‘Alps’, but more of that later.

Tain Golf Course - Photo by reviewer

My day started on the first train out of Glasgow to Inverness where I was picked up to finish the journey, 45 minutes further north, by car. The signs weren’t too promising travelling up as frost, water and mist covered the landscape as far as Perth and I probably wouldn’t have given a buckshee pound note for decent conditions. I shouldn’t have worried as the course was beautifully presented for the time of year, especially the greens. Pin positions on some greens were positioned to protect the green, understandable for the time of year, but that didn’t hinder or spoil our enjoyment one iota.

As if by magic, the sun broke through on the first tee, well it always shines on the righteous so they say, and we were good to go. With conditions almost like a late spring morning the only hint of the time of year was the aforementioned pin positions along with some forward tee positions. The first was as I remembered it followed by the second, normally a par 4 but in winter an excellent par 3 from a forward and slightly off set tee position. Other stand out holes on the outward half being the 3rd and the 9th.

The back nine is dominated by the previously mentioned Alps, a standout and proper signature hole, starting with a difficult drive and a challenging second shot over two mountainous humps, where the hole takes its name from, to a green backed by the Dornoch Firth, marvellous. Other holes to catch my eye were the back to back par 3’s at 16 and 17.

I enjoyed my journey back in time to Tain, a course which should be very proud of its position in the Top 100 of Scotland chart and, although not in the same league as Dornoch or Castle Stuart, a really enjoyable course which should be sought out to play either as a standalone, or part of a double dunt with one of the more celebrated courses in the area.

MPPJ

March 17, 2017
6 / 10
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Mariano Martinez de Azagra

Tain golf course is located on the outskirts of the peaceful village of the same name.

Everything in this small club is delightfully unpretentious, from the entrance, club house or facilities, which is one of its charms: it´s just golf at its simplest form, as there´s no place for unnecessary ornaments.

Tain Golf Course - Photo by reviewer

As for the course, in some of the holes the game strategy is limited to hit the ball straight, because the gorse will swallow any wayward drive. We also found a rather inclement rough.

In any case, there is a good bunch of holes worthy of mention, such as the tough par 4 third, the 11th, Alps, a two shotter with its approach above dunes, or the long par 3 17th.

In short, a good links, and a good complement if you visit the Highlands, but clearly below the level of other nearby courses such as Brora, Dornoch or Castle Stuart.

MMA, Barcelona, Spain.

December 21, 2016
6 / 10
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David Worley
If it is your first time at Tain then the 1st hole may take you by surprise. It is a par four, slightly uphill, of 382 yards. A road bounded by post and wire fencing runs across the fairway about fifty yards from the green. At first sight you cannot see the green behind all this so you begin to wonder where the earth you should be hitting.

The 2nd hole may also catch you unaware as there is a burn running about seventy five yards short of the green. Three is an excellent dogleg left par four of 435 yards. A really bad tee shot may catch water on either side or a long drive can run out of fairway on the right.

The standout hole is the 380-yard par four 11th, appropriately known as ‘Alps’. The tee heads you towards the sea over a bumpy fairway then requiring a blind second shot to a seaside green set behind and below two large mounds.

You may have a good score going but don’t celebrate too soon because the two par threes at 16 and 17 can be potentially disastrous mainly due to the River Tain. At the 215-yard 17th hole it winds its way across the fairway twice and then flows along the length of the green on the right hand side.

This review is an edited extract from Another Journey through the Links, which has been reproduced with David Worley’s kind permission. The author has exclusively rated for us every Scottish course featured in his book. Another Journey through the Links is available for Australian buyers via www.golfbooks.com.au and through Amazon for buyers from other countries.
March 12, 2015
6 / 10
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Peter Gammie
We could not have been better received at the club, both by Stuart the pro. and the bar staff. As for the course, our French friends raved about it: "This is the véritable links! We have nothing like this in France!"The whole experience is magical.
February 25, 2015
10 / 10
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Stefan Hindmarsh
Visited the course today. On arrival the pro was absolutely fantastic and gave me so much time and help - mostly sorting me out a game with two friendly members as I was a single golfer.The course was on full greens apart from two greens and played mostly it's full length. The greens were in great nick! You weren't allowed to play off fairways unless you had a mat (that I did) but overall for mid February it is hard to fault the condition of the course.The course itself is a fantastic track with a real mix of holes. If there is a weak stretch I would say it is 14,15,16 but that is personal preference. One thing for sure is that you wouldn't get bored playing here as there is so much variety between the holes. There is also a real mix of tough, challenging holes and fun birdie holes.I would highly recommend if you are in the area!
February 18, 2015
8 / 10
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Charles Farquharson
Played here twice last month and enjoyed it enormously. You would need at least 2 visits to work out exactly where the green is at the 11th and the best lines on the dogleg holes, but these niggles were more than outweighed by the fun of the layout, the tricky green complexes and excellent putting surfaces. Helpful and friendly staff ( the pro re gripped a club while we waited ) added to our pleasure. CF
September 02, 2014
6 / 10
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francis regan
The first hole apart which is non-descript belies what unfolds into a spectacular golf course, part moorland, part links with some great views. Quirky par 4 blind shots and variation in direction of holes add to a great experience. I played this as part of my james braid trail ticket. Don't miss out the chance to add tain too your dornoch, golspie and brora highlands experience. Its golf at its best. Enjoy....
January 09, 2014
10 / 10
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Gustav
If you are after a combination of understated quality and the infinite pleasure that comes from playing at your own pace, then do play Tain when in the area to play Dornoch. There is more scenery to distract at Brora and Fortrose, but the pure golfing quality of Tain more than makes up for it. Pity that the first hole is so mundane, though.
August 31, 2013
6 / 10
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Matthew Adams
On first sight Tain does not appear to be your quintessential links course. The panorama from the first tee offers no glimpse of the sea but a view of a generous fairway with only light rough separating it from the 18th to the left. The best opening drive should finish on that side of the 1st so it does come into play. This sets the pattern for the rest of the course. The gorse-lined fairways are firm, and at times rather wide, so distance should be no problem. You have to be precise, to allow a good line in for the subsequent approach, Tain Golf Course - Photo by reviewerwith little fringe rough to stop the ball bouncing or rolling off into trouble. Having your tee shot find its way into a fairway bunker is often somewhat of a relief as it will at least be found and maybe eminently playable. In this respect the design is reminiscent in places of the Turnberry Kintyre layout. Few of the fairways are flat, with humps and hollows featuring on most, with only flatter fairways found down by the seaside holes. There is good variety to the length of the holes length of the holes as well. Upon reflection my favourite holes would be 8, 9 and 15 although the 11th stands out also for the two hillocks guarding its front. The first of those is a daunting par3 with gorse seemingly everywhere followed by the tight dogleg right par4 9th where shaping and precision are the watchwords. The 15th stands out due to its fairly short yardage at 330 yards. Having got the tee shot into play the challenge is all about the approach. If the hole is cut near to the swale in front of the green, and the run off to the right, then short game skills are really tested. Powers of concentration are also tested by what must be some of the noisiest sheep you will find anywhere. Perhaps they’re all busy asserting their individuality. By contrast, the noise from the evening train departing the station just adds further charm to the backdrop of the gothic towers of Tain bathed in early evening sunshine. A fine day of golf.
June 27, 2012
6 / 10
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tom
November 02, 2012
Tain is a very good course. A well conditioned free running thinking mans golf course that twists and turns in different directions with very firm interestingly contoured greens and excellent pot bunkering. Many half-blind shots abound with clever use of dips, small mounds, small valleys and cunning use of 'dead ground'. Lots of gorse and some heather and a couple of holes along the firth. Many excellent, testing holes especially in the sequence 9th, 10th and 11th but care is needed just about everywhere - it must be a tough test when the ground is really dry and a strong wind is up. Strong par 3's as well. Not flash or pretentious, just a really good test of golf with very friendly staff and members and amazingly given its generally high standard of course conditioning, only 3 fulltime greenkeepers. My only criticism, and it's a very slight one, is that the course photographs on the clubs website do not do the course any justice - the course is much, much better than the impression given by the photographs. If this course were 'down south' it would receive lots of plaudits. If you're coming to the area put it on your 'to play' list, I very much doubt if you'll be disappointed.