The Country Club (Clyde & Squirrel) - Massachusetts - USA

The Country Club,
191 Clyde Street,
Chestnut Hill,
Brookline,
Massachusetts (MA) 02467,
USA


  • +1 617 566 4301


The Country Club in Brookline played host to the 1999 Ryder Cup matches between the USA and Europe. Team Captains were Ben Crenshaw (US) and Mark James (Europe). For the third successive time, a single point decided the Ryder Cup, which was dubbed the “Battle of Brookline”. Europe hoped for a third successive win and required only four points from the 12 singles matches on Sunday, but the Americans rallied and easily won the first six matches to take the lead. Europe’s chances rested on Jose-Maria Olazabal, who was battling with Justin Leonard. On the 17th, Leonard holed an unlikely long birdie putt that resulted in a premature US Team celebration, which deeply upset the Europeans. Unfortunately Olazabal missed his shorter putt for a half on 17 but went on to a birdie the last to halve the match. USA 14 ½ - Europe 13 ½. The Ryder Cup was played at Valderrama in 1997 and at The Belfry in 2002.

The name may sound a little arrogant and for golfers in the know, there’s no need to explain that THE Country Club was the first of its type in the USA. It’s set in the charming heart of New England but to be precise it’s located in the suburbs of Brookline, Boston Massachusetts.

Apparently there was talk of forming The Country Club way back in 1860, but the Civil War (in part) interrupted proceedings – the club was eventually formed in 1882. Soon afterwards, golf arrived in the shape of a simple 6-hole layout, which was soon extended to 9 holes by Willie Campbell. In December 1894, the Country Club became one of the five founder members of the American Golf Association, which was subsequently renamed the United States Golf Association. The other four charter members were: Newport Country Club, Shinnecock Hills Golf Club, St. Andrew's Golf Club (Yonkers, N.Y.), and Chicago Golf Club.

By 1910, golf had caught on in the Boston area and the course was extended to a full 18 holes. Little did they know that three years later, a defining moment in American golf would take place in the shape of the 1913 US Open, which saw amateur Francis Ouimet – a young, unknown twenty-year-old and a former caddy at the Country Club – defeat the legendary professionals, Harry Vardon and Ted Ray in an exciting 18-hole play-off. Ouimet’s victory injected huge interest in golf in the United States and it gave hope to ordinary Americans by proving that normal people could achieve success alongside those who were more financially fortunate.

The 27 holes in play today at The Country Club were constructed at different times with input from numerous architects. Francis Ouimet won the US Open on the original course (Clyde & Squirrel), but the modern-day championship layout consists of fifteen holes of the original eighteen, with four holes from William Flynn's Primrose nine-hole loop (two Primrose holes are combined to make one tough and long tournament par four).

In 2009, Gil Hanse was entrusted to deliver a Master Plan for the restoration of all 27 holes.

If the above article is inaccurate, please let us know by clicking here

Write a review

Reviews for The Country Club (Clyde & Squirrel)

Average Reviewers Score:
Description: The name may sound a little arrogant and for golfers in the know, there’s no need to explain that The Country Club at Brookline was the first of its type in the USA. Rating: 8.5 out of 10 Reviews: 13
TaylorMade
Mark White

After playing The Country Club’s main course as well as touring the additional holes used for the significant tournaments located on the nine-hole Primrose course, I continue to believe that The Country Club is the finest course in New England and certainly worthy of being included in the top 25 in the USA.

The course sometimes get criticized for the flat land on holes one and fifteen-eighteen. Yet these holes offer a final elevated tee box, angled fairways, good bunkering, and strong green complexes. While they lack the interesting terrain that characterizes most of the course, I like the variety they add to the course.

The other criticisms I have heard of the course are its small greens and numerous short par 4’s. After the recent restoration, many of the greens have been enlarged, particularly the downhill short par 3 twelfth where both my member host and caddie said was nearly 2.5 times bigger than before. I had played the course before many years ago and indeed it looked a lot larger. Several other greens have been enlarged perhaps 10-15% in order to provide more options for pin placements.

I like the shorter holes because they offer some of the more interesting decisions from the tee. Nearly always they result in an approach shot that is blind or semi-blind and typically to one of the smaller greens as well as the more interesting green surrounds. The sixth has the steepest hill on the course on this short par 4 but again is well defended with superb bunkering fronting and surrounding the green.

In conducting major championships, it is a wise move to add the three holes from the Primrose even if two of the holes are significantly modified. The first uses the second green which adds both length and a fronting pond, while the second places a tee between the second green and seventh green to increase the distance on the eighth hole to approximately 625 yards instead of 461 yards. The eighth and ninth of the Primrose are both very good holes.

My only slight disappointment is that the fescue had been recently cut down as we enter autumn because the fescue at The Country Club adds substantially to the visual beauty of the course, even if it is either a lost ball or a difficult recovery. Indeed as we finished the ninth on the Primrose the sun was setting reflecting beautifully through the tree near the eight’s green and bouncing off of the fescue that had yet to be cut down on that hole.

The Country Club for holes 2-14 has the right amount of change in terrain, never overwhelming or making a walk difficult. It that regard it is similar to Myopia Hunt Club or Worcester. I love Eastward Ho, Essex Country Club, and very much enjoyed Winchester, but a few of the holes have so much land movement that it can become a distraction and diminishes the visual appeal of those holes (not the eighteenth at Essex which is superb).

As mentioned in other reviews, the recent renovation has exposed more of the rock outcroppings which also adds to the beauty of the holes. Indeed, looking back from the elevated green of the eleventh back to the tee of this par 5 is one of the best views in inland golf in the USA due to the combination of hills, rocks, trees and grass as the fairway winds and turns on lower ground below the elevated tee and the elevated green.

I have my own personal list of what I consider to be the best holes in the world and The Country Club has two holes on that list, the wonderful long third hole as a par 4 and the eleventh. I would add the modified eighth on the Primrose but since that is not how it is normally played I cannot include it.

But there are so many memorable holes here that I wonder if I should consider adding more. For example I love the short tenth due to the sunken green after playing from the elevated tee. On this hole even the longest players will likely not try for the green given the tall fescue and bunkers in front. But one could also include the short fourth playing across a valley to a dogleg right with a fairway that rolls and heaves finishing on the smallest green on the course well defended by bunkers and thick grass and a falloff quickly behind the green for those going over. The seventh hole par 3 at 197/179 with a false front offers the most undulating green on the course. The eight hole is a long uphill par 4 likely have a blind shot into a green that even after the renovation remains tiny in comparison to the length of the hole. This green also runs away from you a bit so balls likely have to land just shy of the green with some height to not go through the green. The seventeenth hole has the prettiest tree on the main course, set off to the right hanging over the green and adding to the strength of the green complex.

The greens have the right amount of slope and slant as well as contours. The greenside bunkering is superb as well as the micro-contouring surrounding the greens. I was 0-7 on putts of seven feet or less, hitting the edges on most of them. I hit good putts but the greens have just the right amount of subtleties in them to present a good test. Thankfully, I made a few longer ones or stiffed a few chips.

The fairway bunkers never overwhelm you but make you think of the proper line and carry. That is one of the main reasons I like the course so much is that the topography, fairway bunkering, and “hidden” bunkers to the elevated green make one think. I like a course that forces one to make decisions and strike a shot crisply even if I cannot pull it off.

The Country Club is truly terrific which is why it has hosted so many significant tournaments, whether Ryder Cup or the long list of USGA events. It is a course where one can remember the holes very clearly as each one is distinct. The other best courses is the world leave one with a similar memory which is why The Country Club is one of the best course in the world.

October 01, 2021
9 / 10
Reviewer Score:
TaylorMade

Respond to above review
  Was this review helpful?
0 people found this review helpful

Fergal O'Leary

Preparations for the 2022 US Open have been taking place for several years now, and this historic venue in Brookline, MA will once again host professional golfers for the first time since 1999. The magical hands of Gil Hanse and his wonderful team have made brilliant (and subtle) improvements throughout the sublime property, and the tree clearance is just glorious. The exposure of rock cropping and visuals across the course just add to the magic of the place. This club is part of American history and will forever hold a special place in my own heart as it was the first course I ever played in America back in 2001. Not a bad start, right? The Composite (US Open) layout is fierce, and I can’t wait for the event next year, especially given that the back nine is over 4000 yards long and the greens are the smallest around. The sheer fact that this old venue has been so well preserved and is as close to the quirk of Ireland/Scotland as you could imagine, the topography at Brookline will no doubt provide for world class entertainment next summer. We’ll wait and see which squirrel will get the nut.

June 26, 2021
9 / 10
Reviewer Score:
TaylorMade

Respond to above review
  Was this review helpful?
1 person found this review helpful

Daniel Hirsch

Perfect course. It is just amazing. There is so much history on every single hole. The elevation is one of the best parts. There’s so much elevation, especially on the tee boxes. The conditions are perfect. Can’t possibly have better conditions. The layout is top 10 in USA worthy. The fact that it’s in the middle of Boston makes it even more special. It’s truly a special place, and everyone needs to get on there somehow. Another think I love about TCC is the 9 hole course called primrose. On the primrose 4 of the holes are in the US open layout, but every single hole on primrose could very well be a us open hole.

Drop everything to play this course.

June 23, 2021
10 / 10
Reviewer Score:
TaylorMade

Respond to above review
  Was this review helpful?
0 people found this review helpful

Doug Roberts

There are numerous excellent reviews below. Mine will be more a story vs a golf course review. Often, to gain access to US best courses one must meander to alternative access vehicles. I have utilized Charities for that pursuit frequently. As I arrived with my 2 friends we met up with our host for our 3 to play with. We had a glorious day. The course was as advertised. Wonderful. As I walked up 9 with our host she asked me a question. Do you know where the 10th hole is? I replied, yes, it is right over there. She said wonderful, I have never played the back. The course the vast majority play is not the course by which the US Open has been played. That course is a compilation of the 27 holes maneuvered into 18.

December 10, 2020
9 / 10
Reviewer Score:
TaylorMade

Respond to above review
  Was this review helpful?
0 people found this review helpful

Response
Ryan Book
December 10, 2020

You (and the vast majority) are better for having played the true Clyde & Squirrel 18 versus the U.S. Open routing...although the absence of No. 6 is no big loss, the loss of the short par fours at Nos. 4 and 10 is a sad reflection of the strokeplay system. The former is one of my favorite holes I've ever played from a design perspective, but players at the U.S. Open have no reason to take risks. I believe No. 12 — the charming non-Redan named "Redan" — will also disappear for the Open.

David Davis

The Country Club is yet another US gem steeped in tradition and home to The Greatest Game Ever Played.

There is really a lot to like about the routing and some truly fantastic holes. It's an excellent site for golf with rolling hills and some natural rock formations here and there. One of the common characteristics that is unique to the course is the fact that they Country Club (Clyde & Squirrel) Golf Course - Photo by reviewer let the rough grow on a few holes all the way around the green so that there is really no apron to speak off and the greens can only be approached in the air. If there was one point I would be critical of it would be this, yet it's only a clear maintenance choice they make. I'm simply not a huge fan of it. I've heard that some people love it.

It's definitely another course that would require several plays to get a good feeling for but it's also in an area where there are tons of excellent courses. TCC happens to be one of the extremely private and closed clubs which naturally added with the history makes it very unique in most peoples eyes.

I was fortunate enough to be able to stay there during my visit which was truly ideal. What a wonderful atmosphere the club has and a fantastic old school locker room.

Most certainly a treat to play and visit.

October 01, 2019
8 / 10
Reviewer Score:
TaylorMade

Respond to above review
  Was this review helpful?
1 person found this review helpful

Ryan Book

C.B. Macdonald’s “Scorecard” for identifying the ideal golf course leaves little room for one to interpret a route to one’s own whims, especially when the Father of American Golf Architecture lends as much credence to “nature of the soil” as he does the combined “Best length of holes” and “variety and arrangement of length.” The average non-architect will focus on the latter two, especially when beginning a round at The Country Club. “Best length indeed,” you may think to yourself, placing your tee at the 450-yard dogleg left, and hoping not to embarrass yourself in front of the starter at one of America’s premier privates. “Best length INDEED.”

The next 17 holes matter more, both in terms of redeeming yourself and in terms of quality (the opener is perhaps the weakest at Brookline). For every crusher, there is a short Par 4 to assure you, a guest, that you have a chance here. No. 10 is almost as fun as the hole that follows; playing just 311 from the standard tees, the real trick is to best position yourself for a wedge. This wedge will loft uphill to an old-fashioned green that tilts zanily from back left to front right. It almost makes you feel bad for the pros, that they won’t get to experience this as part of the Composite championship course in 2022. Then again, they don’t take well to chicanery (read: fun elements) such as this. As a new update for the U.S. Open, they’ll be skipping No. 4 as well, where the back tee plays shorter in terms of yardage, but teeing over a sheer wall of native grass and rock feeds the paranoia of just how far you can go before you meet sand, fescue, or all of the above. Pros do not like blind shots (I do). One blind shot they won’t be able to avoid is No. 16, where the bunkers fronting the medium-length Par 3 rise up to allow viewing the flagstick, and not much else.

Your correspondent’s adoration for the shorter holes isn’t simply a reflection of how poorly he played on the longer holes. The more beastly Par 4s earn their acclaim, especially at No. 3, where the fairway funnels between a pair of fescued hillocks before presenting a long approach to an obstacle course of bunkers. The closer also questions whether GIR is GIR (grounded in reality). These holes draw attention to the purely American concept of “par,” and whether mid-handicappers such as myself should obsess over it. A two-putt five on either of these fours is a noteworthy mark on the scorecard. That feeling of noteworthiness is more readily available, and the longer holes more appreciated, when the player has the opportunity to score elsewhere. This is the essence of “variety and arrangement of length,” by Macdonald’s word. The antithesis would be a Bethpage Black, which grants little reprieve for little golfers trying to enjoy classic architecture.

Coming into The Country Club, the lack of alternative lengths (two Par 5s and three Par 3s) may sound like a stale round. Given the strength of “variety and arrangement of length” presented by the respective Campbells—Willie and Alex—Brookline could have thrown 19 two-shotters at us and gotten away with it. Well, almost.

We haven’t touched on the club’s greatest hole, the Par 5 eleventh, which is a sight to behold. The hole’s oft-photographed rock formations define the unique geography of Boston, and especially Brookline. Good design is possible anywhere, theoretically. This is not. Enjoy the details of the site, even if that’s while picking for your ball among the thick vegetation edging the bunkers...we still need to research for what species of moss was growing along the No. 18’s greenside bunkers. Horticultural goosebumps.

August 04, 2019
9 / 10
Reviewer Score:
TaylorMade

Respond to above review
  Was this review helpful?
2 people found this review helpful

RM61

The Country Club is one of those courses steeped in history that any golfer should try and play if an invite comes their way. The Clubhouse oozes olds school class and they have done a great job collating historical items. Being one of the focusing fathers of the USGA is cool and they have the telegram set inconspicuously The Country Club (Clyde & Squirrel) Golf Course - Photo by reviewer on the wall as you enter the mens changing room. The course itself is more undulating than it looks on the television and starts with a long par 4…no chance of a gentle warm up! I do like hole 2 a short par 4 although it will play as long par 3 in 2022 which is a shame. There are a number of good holes at The Country Club but I preferred the shorter par 4 holes such as 2,4,6,10 and 17. I really like hole 14 an uphill right to left par 5 with a steep false front….it would have been nice to have more run off areas instead of rough around the greens to test the players short game. Played April 19.

June 08, 2019
8 / 10
Reviewer Score:
TaylorMade

Respond to above review
  Was this review helpful?
0 people found this review helpful

Colin Braithwaite

The club was originally founded in 1882, and claims to be the oldest country club in the United States. In my research I have found some of these claims to be quite entertaining. For example, my home course in Franklin, Tennessee, Old Natchez claims to have been founded in 1882. Regardless, The Country Club is rightfully quite proud of its storied past. It is listed on the USGA's list of the first 100 clubs in America and is one of the five charter clubs of the United States Golf Association. Today it is one of the largest clubs in the northeast, with well over 1000 members. It is also quite infamous for having some of the smallest greens in golf. It is located in Brookline, Massachusetts, which was the birthplace of John F. Kennedy.

As referred to earlier, the original club was focused on equestrian and other outdoor activities as a result of the Myopia Hunt Club being relocated to the hinterlands of South Hamilton, Massachusetts. The golf course was not built until 1893. The first six holes were laid out by three club members. In 1894 Willie Campbell was named the club pro and he expanded the initial six holes to nine. It was not until additional land was acquired that the course could be expanded to 18 holes in 1899. For several years conflicts arose between golfers and other club members over land use. In fact, the first and eighteenth holes where overlapped with a race track!

Today the course played by members consists of two nines called Clyde and Squirrel. In 1927 another nine holes were added, called Primrose. The new nine was designed by William Flynn.

At The Country Club the Open Course is a composite of the three nines. Three holes and a half of a hole from the Primrose replace 3 holes from the Clyde to create a course over 7000 yards. Work is being done to make the course even longer, with a 600 yard plus par 5.

The Country Club is most famous for the 1913 US Open which was won by the US amateur Francis Ouimet. The saga has gained new popularity with the 2005 film “The Greatest Game Ever Played.” Francis Ouimet grew up on Clyde Street, which is across from the 17th green. Francis started caddying at The Country Club when he was nine and taught himself the game. He became one of the best amateur golfers in the state. However, when he was a junior in high school his father insisted that he do something useful with his life and he dropped out. In one of the twists in the tapestry of life, Francis ended up working in a sporting goods store owned by none other than George Wright.

I am sure some of you are wondering who the heck George Wright was? Well, George would be the Bo Jackson of his era. He was born in Yonkers, New York. His father was the club pro at St. George Cricket, hence George and his older brother, who are both in the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, started out as cricket players. Harry Wright was the original manager of the Cincinnati Red Stockings and George, who was 12 years younger, was his shortstop. George is also credited with laying out New England’s first public golf course, Franklin Park, in 1890. While I am sure George’s motives were pure, his company Wright and Ditson Sporting Goods imported and sold golf clubs. What a stroke (no pun intended) of luck, genius or both having Francis Ouimet as an employee!

The 1913 US Open was held at The Country Club. The favorites were both from England, Harry Vardon and Ted Ray. After 72 holes, 36 on Saturday and 36 on Sunday, there was a three way tie at 304, between Vardon, Ray and the twenty year old American amateur Francis Ouimet. The high drama was short lived as Ouimet dominated on Monday. He shot a 72 to Vardon’s 77 and Ray’s 78. Francis Ouimet became the first amateur to win the US Open. The classic David and Goliath battle where the hometown underdog persevered over the dark forces of evil captured the imagination of Americans everywhere. Ouimet’s win is generally credited with creating the first golf craze in the United States. Over the next ten years the number of golfers and golf courses purportedly more than tripled. Significantly, many of these new courses were public, thus expanding the game’s affordability. Oh, and George Wright was able to sell more golf clubs, too! Many of you have seen the iconic picture of Ouimet and his caddy, ten year old Eddie Lowery. Amazingly, you can barely see Francis, but Eddie is literally front and center.

Ouimet never reached this lofty pinnacle again. He chose not to turn professional as he was driven by his father’s admonition to do something useful with his life. . However, in a bizarre twist, the USGA stripped Ouimet of his amateur status in 1916. They felt that Ouimet was leveraging his golf fame to aid his sporting goods business. This may seem absurd by today’s standards. At the time, if you were a caddy, once you reached 16 the only way you could continue caddying was by declaring yourself a professional. Sadly, it was this same type of logic that cost Jim Thorpe his Olympic medals. Unlike Thorpe, Francis Ouimet was able to see an injustice overturned in his lifetime and after World War I the USGA reinstated Ouimet’s amateur status.

The Francis Ouimet Scholarship Fund was started by a group of Ouimet’s friends in 1949. The intent was to provide college scholarships to students who had worked as caddies. Since inception over $20M in scholarships have aided 5000 students. I am delighted to say that my sister, Graeme, is a Ouimet Scholar. In her youth she was one of the first female caddies at Marshfield Country Club.

Back to The Country Club, the 1963 and 1988 U.S. Opens were also held there. These were to commemorate the 50th and 75th anniversaries of the 1913 Ouimet victory. More recently The Country Club hosted the 33rd Ryder Cup. This competition was memorable for many reasons and forgettable for the amazingly ugly outfits that the Americans wore. Actually, the shirts were so ugly, they are impossible to forget. Going into Sunday’s competition the Europeans were leading 10-6. The American team rallied on Sunday, winning the first six matches to take the lead. Jim Furyk beat Sergio Garcia to give the American team 14 points. When Justin Leonard dropped his 45 foot bomb of a putt on 17, pandemonium ensued and the exuberant American team mobbed the 17th green. However, if Jose Maria Olazabel sank his putt, the Europeans would still be alive. Olazabel ultimately missed and the rest is history. Unfortunately, the Americans were accused of poor sportsmanship. Based upon the Rules of Golf nothing was ever cited but the Europeans are insistent that the Americans violated the spirit of the game. I have only one thing to say, “Ole!” The American victory was the closest possible score in Ryder competition, 14 ½ to 13 ½, except for a tie. Alas, it was also one of the last public appearances for Payne Stewart who would die in a plane crash within a month.

A friend of mine, Scott DeBolt, utilized his significant influence to wangle me a tee time at The Country Club. In anticipation, I was there before sunrise. As people started wandering in, the starter and caddy master, a classic curmudgeon named Bill, asked who I was playing with. I explained the situation and Bill said I must be mistaken and he insisted that I must have a tee time at Putterham Golf Course, which was right down the street. Thanks to the marvels of technology I showed him the email chain. He huffed and puffed, said he knew nothing about it and I would have to wait until he got confirmation. Fifteen minutes went by and Bill came out and said the head professional and head greens keeper did not recall approving the tee time request. I calmly said okay and went to work on the phone. I made a couple of calls, my peeps made a couple of calls and while I was on the phone working it, calls started coming into the starter’s shack. I heard Bill stammering and apologizing on the phone and now I knew I was in!

Bill begrudgingly came out of the starter shack and introduced me to my caddy, John. To his credit Bill apologized for the confusion. I asked if we were up and he said the words I had been waiting for, “The tee is yours.” I hit a decent drive, fatted my second shot, hit a good pitch and lipped my putt for a bogey. The second hole is a short par and one of the easiest holes, if you keep it in the fairway. Which, I didn’t. This was my first encounter with the rough and it became obvious the only real play was to wedge it out and take my medicine. Another bogey. The third hole, named Pond, is one of Arnold Palmer’s favorites. It is a long par 4 that bends between hills on the left and rock ledges on the right side with a pond behind the green. Years ago they supposedly harvested ice from this pond in the winter. Also, Tenley Albright practiced her figure skating on this pond en route to her gold medal at the 1956 Winter Olympics.

Over the next five holes all of my approach shots ended up just off the green. I had been warned about the size of the greens and I would pay the price. While the greens had some of the smallest aprons I have ever seen, the kicker was how penurious the rough was. It was a good three inches deep. For a player of my caliber I was just hoping to get the ball on the green and sometimes I did not succeed.

The seventh hole is a 195 yard two tiered green par three. It is well protected with bunkers on both sides and it is the only hole that remains from the original six hole course that was laid out in 1893.

As we made the turn, I reflected on how I did. Overall, I hit the ball pretty well, didn’t hit a lot of greens and was lucky to shoot a 43. Regardless, I was looking forward to the back nine. Number 11, Himalayas, is a classic golf hole. It is similar to number three with exposed granite ledges daring you to try to carry them and with a brook bisecting the fairway about 180 yards from the uphill green.

Once again I hit a good approach shot only to end up in the greenside rough to set up my double bogey.

Number twelve really surprised me. It is a short downhill par three that inexplicably is called Redan. It is anything but a redan green, Upside Down Cereal Bowl would be a more appropriate name. Another super hole is the par 5 14th, called the Quarry. The 14th has some uniquely situated moguls that need to be circumnavigated before one even has a chance to deal with the most severely sloped back to front green on the course. Boy was I happy that the pin was in the back.

When we got to 18, I was determined to finish strong after being brought to my knees time and time again by the greenside rough. I hit a good drive but still had 190 yards to the pin which was right behind the greenside bunker. John said the magic words, “You didn’t come here to lay up.” I go for it with my trusty $17 used Adams five wood. I hit it pretty well, but both John and I knew it had to go. We cheered it on to no avail. Splat, right in the lip of the bunker. As much as I would like to say I made a great up and down for par, I cannot. I finished with an ignominious triple bogey.

Colin Braithwaite is the author of “A Good Walk Unspoiled

July 25, 2018
10 / 10
Reviewer Score:
TaylorMade

Respond to above review
  Was this review helpful?
3 people found this review helpful

Steve MacQuarrie

One of the many fun aspects of this site is the variety of opinions one finds. There is, however, little variety in the reviews of The Country Club. Not one of the site’s reviewers found it worthy of six balls, making it one of two of the site’s top 50 U.S. Courses to earn that distinction (Southern Hills being the other).

This review will not change that and here's why:

-The green complexes are dull. While many (2,4,5,6,9,10, 11 and 18) are tilted to make for big breaks, only three (7,12 and 17) have any contours to really challenge the player’s green reading ability..

-There’s little variety in the par 3s. Having only 3 doesn't help and two of these (7 and 16) often require the same club.

-For a traditional course, the player is forced to approach the greens aerially too often. Some of these are the result of elevated greens. Others are because of bunkers fronting the putting surfaces. But in a number of cases (2,6,9,10,16) there is room in front for a running approach, but what could be fairway is maintained a rough, eliminating the running approach.

I can think of a half dozen courses within 30 miles I’d rather play.

The course does have a fine collection of par 4s, but the real highlight of a visit is the clubhouse, a museum to the club’s storied history. You may take a moment to climb the stairs to see one of the original stimpmeters, invented by member Edward Stimpson after the 1935 U.S. Open at Oakmont. Of course, the club doesn’t tell you the full story—that Stimpson was a member at nearby Wellesley Country Club when he devised it.

July 10, 2017
8 / 10
Reviewer Score:
TaylorMade

Respond to above review
  Was this review helpful?
1 person found this review helpful

Response
Colin Braithwaite
January 16, 2019

i gave it 6 balls. I understand your position, part of it is about history. The Old course isnt that grand either

John Sabino

One of the features that you find throughout the course are the glacial rock formations that holes are routed through and around, such as the par five 11th hole, aptly called Himalayas. You hit your tee shot on this hole from a high, elevated tee to a crevice in the rock canyon on the left side of the fairway. Midway between the bottom of the canyon and the elevated green is a creek that runs through the bottom of the hole. Not the type of hole you see every day and one that really uses the geography present to maximum advantage.

The terrain for the 18 holes is quite hilly and used to good effect, although it is not a terribly difficult course to walk. I know I am beating a drum on this topic, but I am again struck by how the world's great golf courses contain so many blind shots, which I really like. The #1 handicap hole, the third, is another case in point with a blind second shot to the green. The course also has a Redan hole, the short 12th, although it is a non-traditional version of the Redan. The hole plays from an elevated tee sharply down hill and is only 130 yards. Although it's not a typical Redan hole, I thought it was very good and guarded by a plethora of bunkers in the front.

The greens at The Country Club are all small. Along with Inverness and Pebble Beach, among the smallest in championship golf. Another unique feature of the course is the small chocolate-drop style mounds that are present around some of the greens. They force you to play from an uneven lie as a penalty for a missed green. If you get a chance to play, I recommend wandering around the buildings around the oval driveway before or after your round. They are all old and impressive.

John Sabino is the author of How to Play the World’s Most Exclusive Golf Clubs

November 25, 2016
6 / 10
Reviewer Score:
TaylorMade

Respond to above review
  Was this review helpful?
0 people found this review helpful