Trump International Golf Links - Scotland - North East Scotland - Scotland

Trump International Golf Links,
Menie Park Lodge,
Menie Estate,
Balmedie,
Aberdeenshire,
AB23 8YE,
Scotland


  • +44 (0) 1358 743300

Occupying a three-mile stretch of North Sea coastline between Murcar Links and Cruden Bay, Trump International Golf Links is the latest American-inspired, high profile course to open in Scotland since the start of the new millennium.

Like Renaissance Club, Castle Stuart and Machrihanish Dunes, ownership of the course lies on the US side of the Atlantic and its proprietor took seven long years to get golfers onto the first tee as he had to overcome a series of objections that were made to siting the fairways within a Site of Special Scientific Interest.

But overcome the protestations of the environmentalists and landowners is exactly what he did and one of the wisest moves that Trump made early on was to promote respected architect Martin Hawtree from “links consultant” to lead designer because his vast experience – particularly in working on Open courses for the R&A – would prove invaluable when it came to routing holes around the dramatic dunes on the Menie Estate.

Apart from the 229-yard par three 13th, all holes are laid out in a north-south direction close to the shoreline and some have criticised this orientation as being somewhat uninspired. However, if the most exciting topography is to be found between the dune systems that run naturally along the coast then why would anyone dream of routing the fairways any other way?

As you might expect at any Trump golf facility, everything here is top spec for a links: bent and fescue grass greens (that are sensibly contoured), fully revetted bunkers (of which there are eighteen on the 18th), at least five tee boxes on every hole (holes 3 and 4 have seven), and an astonishing ten acres of grass pathways to convey golfers from one green to the next tee position – all that and not a cart path in sight.

During the official opening ceremony of the course on 10th July 2012 (click here for details), PGA and European Tour officials spoke of Trump International Golf Links as a venue worthy of major professional golf competitions in the future. It will be interesting to see what comes its way in the years ahead.
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Reviews for Trump International Golf Links - Scotland

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Description: Occupying a three-mile stretch of North Sea coastline, Trump International Golf Links is the latest American-inspired, high profile course to open in Scotland since the start of the new millennium. Rating: 8.6 out of 10 Reviews: 47
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Marty Brown
Played Trump last week of October just before it closed for the winter. We've all heard the hype about the course and the negative TV programme against the place but I’ll speak only about the course and what I experienced. We got a first class welcome from everyone we made contact with but that is accepted at places of this nature. Quite simply every hole is stunning. While playing I reflected on how I would rank the course. For me I enjoy Royal Birkdale, especially the par 3’s. IMO the par 3’s here are better so that is some way to get a feel on how good the place is or is going to be. Previous comments made about playing off the right tees to maximize your enjoyment. This is critical, don’t massage your ego and play off tees to far back. They were top dressing the fairways as we played. I don’t know why they couldn't have waited 2 days when the course shuts for the winter. Having said that the layout is truly magnificent with some of the best run off's I’d seen. The conditioning will only get better and I'm sure it won’t be long before we see World Class players teeing it up at Trump International Links.
November 05, 2012
10 / 10
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GF
I was invited to play this course earlier this year. The condition of course was fine (for a new course) but clearly needs time to settle. The greens have very little grass on them and have been dyed to appear as though there is plenty of grass on them. They are true but slow and a ball landing on them is like hitting a drum as they are very soft with no roll. The views are excellent from the elevated tees. and the course was clearly designed with this in mind. With the tees so high and exposed I suspect that the designer has failed to take into account the typical weather conditions for the area. Any ball landing in the rough is lost and there is no pointing looking for any ball which strays offline. What Trump has done to at least one of the property owners (I think around the 10th tee) is nothing short of disgraceful. He has built an earth bank all around the house and planted large fast growing hedges to prevent the occupiers from having any views at all - this is clearly the actions of a bully. I am glad I have played the course. Do I wish I was a member - no. Will I return - no. Is it worth the green fee - no. There are many courses in Scotland which are much better albeit most do not have the fantastic views of this course. Everyone in our fourball agreed with the above comments. The course is over hyped by the journalists and golf writers invited to play to provide favourable reviews.
October 21, 2012
6 / 10
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Tom
October 23, 2012
Excellent review and comments. I realise that this is a course rating website but one cannot ignore the general brouha that has surrounded the building of this course. Trump may have built a spectacular golf course but it does not escape the fact that it should have not have been built in the first place. This area had the highest level of environmental protection available in Scotland. It was a unique area of shifting sands now stabilised and lost. As to Trump's motives I suspect the plans for 800 houses round the course are ultimately of far more interest to him than the course. I would urge all well healed golfers to vote with their feet and not play this course.
Sandy
October 24, 2012
Trying to focus purely on the golf side of things I must disagree with the conclusion that the writers have over hyped this course. For me it has one of the finest collection of par 3s in the country. Apart from the odd positioning of the double fairway on 10, the par 5s are equally stunning. It's true that the rough is brutal in places but the fairways are very generous so if a ball ends up in the thick stuff it's usually what the shot deserved. The wide fairways also makes the course playable in the wind so claiming that Mr Hawtree failed to take the local weather into account is asking a bit much.
martin
October 25, 2012
I agree with the last comment. I played the course twice in July and still remember every hole and every shot I played. Mr. Trump might not be the most likable person on the planet, but his claim that this course will become the best in the world, is not far from the truth. For the sake of fairness, it would be best to make the assessment of Mr. Trump and his course two separate things. With regard to the environment and damage to the site: In my view Martin Hawtree and his team did a tremendous job. If you would take the flag sticks out and abandon the course, the place would get his original form back in no time. Which in my view is a sign of great and responsible golf course architecture.
James
December 06, 2012
it's a shame that some people have chosen to use this review page for golf courses as a way to have a go at Trump! I have played the course twice and I will return again next year as I think this course is amazing and will only get better as it matures. As somebody else said in one of the reviews I can remember every hole on the course which in my view is high praise. I have played a few of the top courses in Scotland and I would say this is by far the best I have played to date.
David
December 07, 2012
It does look beautiful, but it actually looked much more so before, so what you're seeing is a spoilt landscape. The sad reality is that playing this course will always leave a nasty stain on the reputation of anyone who plays it. When Clinton plays it next year, it will be branded as the Monica Lewinsky of golf courses and that tag will stick fast.
Sandy
December 08, 2012
By David's reasoning every golf course on the planet would be a "spoilt landscape". Were you opposed to the opening of Castle Stuart, Kingsbarns, Machrihanish Dunes or what about Barnbougle Dunes, Lost Farm or the courses at Bandon? If not, why not? Fortunately playing a golf course does not stain anyone's reputation. I'd advise you to take up the game and enjoy the course as your comments are not those of a real golfer.
Sandy
Let’s not beat about the bush, this is a stunning golf course. It has been set up to test the very best players and most probably will in a few years time after the Scottish Open has had its stint at neighbouring Royal Aberdeen. I am reluctant to rate it in relation to the other great Scottish courses as the conditioning simply wasn’t there when I played in mid-summer but I can confidently say that it is the most spectacularly designed course in the country with more memorable holes than almost any other.

I will focus on the best holes which in my opinion are 3-7, 10 and 18. The 3rd is an improved version of the 11th at Castle Stuart which is high praise indeed but absolutely deserved. The green seems to be elevated in an island of rough with a large and deep bunker to the right and the unforgiving North Sea coastline tucked tightly to the left hand side. Demanding a faded approach it offers very limited opportunities of redemption for a less than perfect tee shot and a 3 is a great result. The fourth is a stunning par 5 featuring a wide burn enclosed by granite slabs that advances up the entire right hand side. With no bunkers off the tee you can let one rip to try to get there in two but a myriad of fairway bunkers short of the green means that only the purest of ball strikers will make it. For those laying up the green is sufficiently sloped with some great run-off areas to ensure that birdies are very hard earned.

The fifth is a short par 4 from one of many tees positioned high on the dunes. It gives you the option of nailing a driver over a fairway bunker or papping a 3 wood to the right side bail out. Again the green is raised and narrow to ensure that nothing is taken for granted with the approach. Not a long hole but one which can be played in different ways and where each shot must be given absolute consideration. Six is another great par 3 seemingly played from the top of one dune to the top of another. A shot played to the left side will kick down from a blind area to the left of the green which is just as well as there is a deep bunker, marram clad slope and burn to the right. Unfortunately the Aberdeen haar was in when I tackled this one meaning that the selected line was something of a lottery. Hole 7 is a great risk/reward par 4 although it possibly overly favours the former over the latter. At only around 280-300 yards it is seemingly there for the taking but anything other than a perfect strike will give birdie opportunities. Anything too far left or right is as good as lost in the dunes and there are bunkers at exactly the point you would want to lay up to. The green wouldn't look out of place at Dornoch meaning that even good drives may still get par at best. An fascinating hole that verges on being unfair but still great fun to play.

Ten is an interesting par 5 which has a magnificent green placement at almost 90 degrees to the fairway and located in a bowl of huge dunes. There is supposedly an option to take on the green in 2 from the right side of a split fairway but the positioning of the tee meant that the right hand route would have been sheer folly to attempt. I’d like to think that Dr Hawtree had an extra kummel the night before he drew this one up or maybe this was Trump's doing. Not too sure but I’d bet that some tweaking is done here in the next few years. And then there is eighteen. At a mere 650 yards from the tips it is what all finishing holes dream to be. Again playing from a huge dune the view back over the rest of the course is stunning but there is no relaxing here! You can go for length down the left and risk finding a watery grave or lay up short right of a group of fairway bunkers that must be avoided to stand any chance of making par. In the 180 yards up to the green there seems to be more sand than grass as this is where the majority of the hole's 18 bunkers reside. A spectacular end in keeping with the 17 holes preceeding it. In time I may reflect that the 18th, like much of the rest of the course is somewhat over the top. However at the moment I can only see it in a positive light as every hole brings an interesting and new challenge to be considered.

The land was just destined for golf and world class golf at that, just a shame it had to be Trump to make it happen. Five stars now but a guaranteed six in a year or two when the conditioning comes together, can't wait to return.
October 05, 2012
8 / 10
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Tom Sadowski
October 21, 2012
I’m truly disgusted at the building of this course after watching the BBC Documentary. I play of 1 and love golf. I will never play this course truly against the spirit of the game. To say that money buys all ain’t a lie.
Matthew Adams
October 21, 2012
TO ALL GOLFERS EVERYWHERE: Golf is a game played by the rules, even when nobody is looking. Please watch "You've been Trumped" by whatever means you can, including the BBC website. I will say nothing more political than that. Thank you.
tom
October 22, 2012
At times this BBC programme seemed a little biased - although one should always remember that TV (perhaps regrettably) is an entertainment as well as an information medium, and limited entertainment value (ie no Trump bashing) would've probably made less enthralling TV viewing and thus lower TV ratings. However, that some ego driven wheeler-dealer money-bags, whatever his nationality, should be allowed to ride roughshod over environmental law and locals homes etc is a disgrace.

Although not a native, I lived in the area for many, many years and know this particular stretch of coastline and duneland well. It it wonderful area and, as a golfer since childhood, I couldn't help but think that it would make a wonderful location for a links golf course...........but, and it's a huge but..............as well as having peoples homes and farms and coastal fishing access within it, the area is a Site of Special Scientific Interest............ and this is a very, very important aspect of environmental protection legislation. The Scottish Parliament in particular, should be ashamed of itself for intervening and various local authorities and bodies, especially Robert Gordons Uni and the local police, didn't come out of the programme smelling of roses either. As for Mr Ego's argument that it'll bring long-term jobs to the areas residents, that's simply PR baloney, for example, as the programme showed, the Head Greenkeeper is from Ireland not from N.E. Scotland and the course architect is English. Looks like the only growth area employment wise is in private security staff!!

If you're visiting this area there are already some cracking links courses to play on this coastline with the standouts being the ever-so-difficult Carnoustie, rumpled Montrose, the truly wonderful Royal Aberdeen, Murcar, Newburgh, the slightly idiosyncratic but always fabulous Cruden Bay plus Fraserburgh, the 7th oldest golf club in the world. Perhaps better golfing interest could be obtained by playing several of these other tremendous links and/or the many other splendid courses in the area instead of paying out £170 to play a 5-6 hour round on Mr Ego's Plaything behind groups of golfing voyeurs ticking off their personal 'I've played it" lists and oil etc industry bigwigs on freebee corporate events.

Although the photos on the courses website make it look a stunning course, ultimately I imagine the high cost of play, the measly discount offered to local residents (the opposite policy of Castle Stuart) plus the interesting climate in N.E. Scotland for at least half the year - icy winds and goretex jackets galore, yippee! - will determine who actually tees it up at Mr Ego's Plaything. Just a disgraceful shame that peoples homes etc and environmentally legislation including an important SSSI had to be trampled over to build it. No more development like housing or hotels either. This issue has gone on to long and has gone to far already. Maybe plans for even more offshore windturbines (sic) will halt Mr Ego's further intentions, but on second thoughts, lets not get into that debate...............
DE
October 23, 2012
I watched the BBC show. It was indeed very shocking to watch and has tainted my desire to play this course for now. However, do we think this was any different 100 or so years ago? Was a land owner of many generations not trampled over to allow the likes of Royal County Down or Royal St Georges to be built? 100 years on we probably know the courses as beauties that have always existed. If it survives, the same will probably be true here in generations to come.
DC
June 28, 2013
The course layout, dunes and lack of space for Grandstands , tented village etc. mean that this course is likely NEVER to hold a major golf tournament.
SR
July 04, 2013
It has more space than Royal Aberdeen so it could quite easily host the Scottish Open. It will never host the Open Championship for many reasons, the main one in my eyes being that the R&A are none to keen to change things up anyway and especially not to one with Trump in the title.
Michael
I played ‘The Donald’s’ latest addition to his portfolio of golf courses on the 24th July, a mere matter of weeks after Mr Trump’s ceremonial first tee shot found the deep stuff on the 1st hole. First off, as stunning as the scenery undeniably is, the course looks and plays as though it has recently opened for play. As others have previously mentioned the ball wasn’t running like on a traditional links. There was a lot of sand on the fairways and greens were anything but lightening. In my opinion the course will need at least a few years to fully bed in. I’m not going to go into hole by hole details but the holes that stick in the mind for me were the par 4 14th through the towering dunes and the par 5 18th, along with the collection of fantastic par 3s. Mention must be given to the fantastic practice facilities. You’ve really got no excuses for topping your fist tee shot if you’ve warmed up either at the range or the short game area. I would like to return to the course once the clubhouse has been built. Although the temporary clubhouse does have the essentials, it isn’t the most spacious of spaces. Come the summer of 2014 I’m looking forward to revisiting Trump International Golf Links to see if it realises its undoubted massive potential. Best course in the world…I’d still plump for Pine Valley or Cypress Point (if I’m ever invited).
September 20, 2012
8 / 10
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Tim Lloyd
I was lucky enough to be invited to play TGIL through work and the overall experience was something that will live long in the memory. Firstly, I expected it to be a little bit pretentious but I couldn't of been more wrong. All the staff, including our excellent caddy, we're friendly, down to earth and clearly proud to work there. The course itself is simply awesome. It's a beast of course. Very tough off the tee but one which rewards good shots and is score able but you have to have a good day off the tee as anything not on the fairway is gone. I won't go into a hole by hole account, suffice to say each one is different, challenging and awe inspiring. A round here is a must for anyone bothering to read this. I hope one day I'll have a chance to go back and play it again because it will only get better and was simply a great experience.
September 20, 2012
10 / 10
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Richard
September 21, 2012
Every hole is stunning, cut in to the dunes of the Menie Estate. Tight fairways make it a proper challenge - make sure you take a couple of sleeves of balls! The greens are immaculate and the bunkers are feindish. It''s exactly what you expect from a Trump course, and more.
Paul Frame
I was fortunate enough to play TIGL last week as a special 40th Birthday treat. Having looked forward to it for a number of weeks I could not help think that I might be setting myself up for some disappointment.How wrong I was. It is true that there are some signs of newness and areas that need to settle in. Most noticeably that the areas around the greens are quite long and don't run like a traditional links course. The greens themselves were superb. They were not at the speed they will ultimately reach although I would question how low they can go before the strong winds will blow balls around.The track is simply stunning and a real challenge in itself which becomes even stiffer when coupled with a strong wind. I didn't really get used to the beauty of the course and was still left standing on the tees in awe right up till the end of the round.Having played a number of courses in the top 100, for me this is the best and most challenging course I have ever played.When you couple this with the excellent service and friendliness from the staff you have to admit that Mr Trump has done an excellent job.My advice would be if you can splash out and play this course you wont regret it.
September 17, 2012
10 / 10
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Brian Ward
Having seen the breathtaking pictures and read the incredibly positive reviews we made the seven-hour pilgrimage north with feelings of great anticipation but also some caution. How often are you seduced by the hype and bluster only to be left feeling a little disappointed as you throw your clubs into the boot of the car? We need not have worried; from start to finish the beauty, routing and challenge of this magnificent new course captivated us.

Trump International Golf Links - photo by Brian WardOn arrival you are offered free use of the superb practice facility and range. The chipping area is made up of numerous greens and bunkers and is certainly the best we have seen in Britain. The putting green is a massive 300 square metres in size and will test your skills to the limit. The current clubhouse is a temporary structure, but it is expected that the larger more permanent version will be complete by the end of 2013.

Arriving at the first tee you are reminded more of the West Coast of Ireland than anywhere in Scotland. At times recollections of days spent at Enniscrone, Ballybunion, Carne and Doonbeg came to the surface but in truth the sand dunes here are on a much grander scale. Choice of tee is vital to your enjoyment as the fairways need time to bed-in and therefore are offering very little run at present. The greens and surrounds are excellent without being tricked up but are understandably quite slow at present. Even if you avoid the deep revetted bunkers, there are plenty of run-off areas around the greens which will give your short game a full work out.

Trump International Golf Links - photo by Brian WardThe grass pathways between greens, tees and fairways are a classy addition. They weave around some dunes and cut right through others leading you expectantly to the next visual delight.

Most of the fairways are routed through the natural corridors; many give you uneven stances but in the main they are quite generous in width. However many of the tees are set at an angle which can deceive you in to thinking that the landing areas are quite narrow. Add thick marram grass and strong crosswinds to the mix and even the best players may feel intimidated at times.

Trump International Golf Links - photo by Brian WardIn our opinion there is not a weak hole on the course. Not every hole can be magnificent but here a very high percentage most certainly are. The collection of par threes is simply stunning. The 3rd is set between a high sand dune and the sea; the 6th sits amongst dunes left and rear with a huge drop to a burn on the right. The13th is a majestic valley hole and the 16th with its cavernous bunkers, runs away from you at an angle making correct club selection vital.

The four par fives are also memorable. The 1st provides an exceptional start, the 4th has a burn running the full length of the fairway and the 10th doglegs to a green which nestles beyond a narrow entrance between dunes. The final hole is a beast measuring 651 yards from the tips so be sure that the wonderful views of the North Sea don’t distract you from the 18 bunkers on the hole.

There is great variety amongst the par fours with the 5th, 7th and 15th offering a risk and reward option to the better player. Depending on wind direction and which tee is being used you may wish to have a go at the putting surface. The 8th, 9th and 17th on the other hand offer a stern challenge for anyone hoping to get there in regulation.

Trump International Golf Links - photo by Brian WardAnother of our favourite holes was the spectacular 14th. Walking through a narrow gap in the dunes you are suddenly met with one of the most magnificent vistas in golf. You tee off from high dunes to a ribbon of fairway running along the valley floor, with panoramic views of the sea on your right this is a magical spot to linger for a few moments so don’t forget the camera.

Course architect Martin Hawtree should be immensely proud of his work here which will undoubtedly see his reputation rise even higher across the world of course design. Give this masterpiece a year or two to mature and we could potentially have another British high-flyer in the World Top 100. The press have already spoken of Donald Trump’s desire to host a major tournament and the 2022 Ryder Cup has been mentioned as a possible target. Donald has friends in high places in the golf and business world as well as the necessary financial clout. I for one would not bet against it. Brian Ward
September 13, 2012
10 / 10
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Keith Baxter
September 14, 2012
Despite both Andy and Jim attending the official opening of the Trump International Golf Links back in July, it has taken until this week for one of the Top 100 team to actually play the much-publicised new course.

On Monday, Brian Ward, our Midlands and North West England correspondent, played here and was suitably impressed (as you will see from his above review).

It was a great surprise for us to find that one of the UK’s leading golf magazines decided to rank the Trump International Golf Links as the 8th best course in Britain & Ireland two months before it officially opened for general play. This was the highest new entry in the magazine’s long-established rankings and might in retrospect be considered a mistake.

I have spoken to Brian in length about his experience at Trump’s latest venue and there is no doubt that this course will in time become worthy of a very high ranking position indeed. But the course is currently not playing like a links course, with no roll on the fairways and slow putting surfaces. I can understand how frustrating it is for golf clubs such as Royal Dornoch, Royal Lytham & St Annes and Carnoustie to find a brand new course, that has not even officially opened let alone bedded in, ahead of them in the magazine rankings of a publication that biennially claims to be definitive.

We suspect that Trump International Golf Links will become the highest new entry in our next rankings, but for the meanwhile the new links will have to settle for entry as a Gem. I hope to play TIGL next year, by which time I think it may be ready for a more meaningful ranking assessment. Keith Baxter, Editor-in-Chief
Graham Methold
September 14, 2012
Well said - a very measured and sensible approach to the golf rankings.
Neil Dawson
September 15, 2012
Some excellent points. I played the course last week and whilst it is visually sensational and a delight to play, the fact that the fairways are kept very long(understandable as it new) means that it is unrealistic to rank this coure in the top ten at present. I can only assume that Golf World decided to rank the course without sending all of their panel to play it. Make no mistake though, this course is very good indeed and will be regarded as one of the very best in the UK given time to mature. Neil Dawson.
AJ Sherratt
September 17, 2012
It does look superb, the only downside is that at £150 a round it is (like many other top courses) overpriced, thus meaning it is unplayable to many of us
AJ
September 18, 2012
I wouldnt play the course out of principle.
JAS
September 18, 2012
Yep, good measured review, I played it last week too on a trip that took in Carnoustie, Royal Aberdeen and Kingsbarns. It is visually stunning, presents a great challenge now but once it matures, the fairways get firmer and the greens get cut faster it will be awesome and well capable of hosting big events. Even the practice areas are superb with plenty space to work on all aspects of your short game. But I would agree that it cannot currently seriously be ranked above the other 3 courses I played. In time though I think around a 4 to 10 ranking could well be justified Yes it is pricey, I thought £4.00 for a coffee when I arrived bordered on the ridiculous.
dan
September 18, 2012
To AJ, I wouldn't worry too much, given the location there are bound to be offers to be taken up. Kingsbarns is about the only new course in recent times that has resisted giving deals, and even they must bow to common sense soon once they are no longer the new kid on the neuk.
AJ
October 19, 2012
The reason why I wouldnt go near this place is that I and many others believe that this course should never have been built in the first place. See the 'youve been trumped' documentary on bbc 2 and make your own mind up.
Keith Baxter
October 22, 2012
AJ makes an interesting point about not playing the course out of principle. I watched last night’s film on BBC2 with interest. It was at times amusing but generally more worrying than almost any other documentary I’ve ever seen.

The portrayal of the Scottish Government, the Grampian Police and the fact that a blind eye was turned to Trump’s off-plan earth moving left me sick. Anthony Baxter’s arrest was outrageous and should be answered by the Police Complaints Commission.

In my response dated 14th September above, I stated that I hope to play the course next year but I now find myself wrestling with my principles. I’d like to see what unlimited money has created, but I’m nervous that I will find an excellent golf course that has been created by someone who does not play with a straight bat.

I usually prefer the lighter touch and am surprised that Trump did not route the course sympathetically through a supposedly protected site. If this development had occurred in the USA I’m convinced the golf course would already have Audubon status.

On the west coast, David Southworth and Joe Deitch developed Machrihanish Dunes on a SSSI site with a feather-like touch, respecting the fragility of the coastal environment. On the east coast Doctor Donald Trump bulldozed his way past residential homes, flagrantly ignoring plans.

For the love of money I’d like to know what went wrong at Balmedie and why greed prevailed?

After waking up this morning in a grumpy mood, The Guardian’s TV critic Sam Wollaston made me smile: TV review: You've Been Trumped; The Thick Of It
AJ Sherratt
October 23, 2012
Prior to watching the TV programme the other night I was of the opinion that Trump was building a golf course / hotel etc. and this would be a real positive point as it would create a large amount of jobs (in the build, but also in the future years for greens staff to hotel staff), it would also put Aberdeen more on the golfing map and bring visitors to the area. My prior thoughts on the locals were ‘’sticks in the mud’’ and really they should ‘’take the money offers and move on’’, but having watched the TV programme with interest I was shocked by Trumps lack of thought and consideration for these people, I am sure a more ‘’let’s sit down, talk and agree what is agreeable to both sides’’ would have been a better approach. This would have created positive media news for this project and thus perhaps this would have worked in Trumps favour in the long term. The arguing about small boundary lines and the huge mounding of soil / sand right outside locals houses was really very shocking !

I have regularly visited this area now for the last 15+ years and have played a lot of the courses around Aberdeen / Moray, I do see that the course does look very appealing (though very expensive) but having seen the TV programme I am probably going to boycott it out of principal because of the complete lack of Trumps consideration to the local peoples past history and their current lives. I could be wrong and the TV programme might be biased against Trump, but my feelings are that a different approach should have been taken to help both the locals and Trump to find some sort of amicable agreement, there did appear to be lots of space to re-route the golf course layouts and position the new buildings whilst looking at existing features …… such as people’s homes ! Funny how other new courses (Kingsbarns, Castle Stuart and St Andrews Castle) never had this sort of trouble, and they are possibly less money to play !