Trump Turnberry (King Robert the Bruce) - Ayrshire & Arran - Scotland

Trump Turnberry Resort,
Ayrshire,
KA26 9LT,
Scotland


  • +44 (0) 1655 334032


Visit Golfbreaks.com for a golf holiday at Turnberry

Golf has been played at Turnberry for well over a century now, starting when Lord Ailsa commissioned Willie Fernie, the professional at Troon, to lay out the first course for Girvan Golf Club in 1901. This 18-hole layout became the No.1 course when the No.2 arrived eight years later.

The No.1 course became known as the Ailsa between the two World Wars then the Arran appeared in 1954, shortly after Philip MacKenzie Ross rebuilt the war-ravaged Ailsa.

Almost half a century then elapsed before Martin Ebert, working at the time with Donald Steel, reworked part of the old Arran course to form the 18-hole Kintyre layout, with this new course opening at the start of the new millennium.

The acquisition of Turnberry by Donald Trump in July of 2014 would then propel golf at the resort to an altogether different level over the next three years and by far the smartest move the new owner made was appointing Martin Ebert to oversee the wholesale redesign of the golf operation.

The pitch & putt course in front of the hotel was recreated, the links academy and practice facility was refurbished, a new Cairngorms putting green was installed and the clubhouse was completely renovated before the Ailsa underwent an extensive upgrade.

The last piece of the jigsaw to fit into place was the relaunch of the former Kintyre track as the King Robert the Bruce course, named in honour of the man who, raised as a boy in Turnberry Castle (where the lighthouse now stands) at the end of the 13th century, became King of Scots in 1306.

Significant modifications were made by contractor SOL Golf to many of the holes – the burn on the 1st was removed, sandy waste areas were established on several holes, a large wetland area was created between the 5th and 13th, trees were toppled to the left of the 7th, and the home green was lowered in front of the clubhouse.

As if that wasn’t enough, all the bunkers were overhauled, with fairway traps given a rugged marram-fringed look and greenside sand hazards shaped as traditional revetted pots.

Four new holes were introduced on Bain’s Hill, largely reversing the routing of the holes that were once located there. The elimination of the short par four 8th down to the cove by the water’s edge will be a regret to some, while others will rejoice that this blind hole has been abolished.

The new par five 8th heads towards the lighthouse, playing to a green that sits above the 12th fairway on the Ailsa. The 9th then returns in the opposite direction and the approach shot requires a heroic carry across the old 8th greensite to a green perched high on the headland.

The par three 10th begins a back nine which is now configured with three par fives, three par fours and three par threes. Measuring between 142 yards and 166 yards, this short hole calls for an all-carry tee shot across a sandy waste area to a tricky little green on the other side of a gully.

The 11th hole (formerly a par four on the Kintyre but now lengthened to a par five) then heads down the side of the hill – on the same compass bearing as the 8th fairway but never interfering with it – to the flatter part of the property where the closing holes are located.

It’s never an easy proposition to play second fiddle to a course ranked near the summit of the World Top 100 but the new King Robert the Bruce course (opened in June 2017) does very well in its support role to a more illustrious sibling. Suffice to say, Trump Turnberry is now a 36-hole golf destination of real substance.

Trump Turnberry Resort is one of our Top 100 Golf Resorts of the World

If the above article is inaccurate, please let us know by clicking here

Write a review

Reviews for Trump Turnberry (King Robert the Bruce)

Average Reviewers Score:
Description: The exhilarating King Robert the Bruce course at Trump Turnberry opened for play in 2017 after Martin Ebert returned to redesign the Kintrye course which the architect laid out in 2001. Rating: 6.7 out of 10 Reviews: 31
TaylorMade
Jim Robertson
For me the Kintyre is a 'nearly course'. It is certainly above average but I can not rate it higher than four balls. While enjoying (?) the free basket of balls before teeing off I was treated to the sight of our most recent Ryder Cup captain hitting balls in front of an admiring crowd. Luckily Monty didn't see my playing companion losing three - yes, three - balls on the very first hole! There are a number of fine holes sprinkled through the course : pride of place to 9,11 and 17. As for the celebrated 8th, having now played it a few times I am of the opinion it is a very silly hole that completely fails to do justice to one of the greatest greens in world golf. I can't believe the designer did not utilise this extraordinary setting to create what would have been one of the great short par 3 holes in the world by playing it from the high point to the left of the green. As it is, you play what is often a blind second shot with the bounce a complete lottery. To conclude, the Kintyre is fine but completely lacks the 'wow' factor. (Other than its spectacular location, of course!)
August 19, 2011
6 / 10
Reviewer Score:
TaylorMade

Respond to above review
  Was this review helpful?
0 people found this review helpful

Response
Jim McCann
I really enjoyed my third visit to the Kintyre as a wee winter warmer to help get the swing back into some sort of action after a dreadful winter that saw no golf played for weeks on end. The opening half dozen fairways on the course are flanked by what I imagine to be the tallest specimens of gorse in all of Scotland so if you spray the ball too far to either side you can forget about finding it again. Turnberry (Kintyre) Golf Course - Photo by Jim McCannThis is the flattest, least inspiring section on the course but it does provide good solid links golf. I’m still not a fan of the loop around Bain’s Hill from the 7th to the 11th though the green position in the cove at the 8th is just wonderful – critics of this hole must surely be those who hoped to birdie the short par four but ended up with bogey or worse?

It was a bit of a slog heading for home over the last six holes into the teeth of a gale - again, the terrain adjacent to the old military runway is pretty level and difficult to make interesting - but you have to pay full attention at the last as the merciless bunkers on the 18th will suck you in and spit you out in the blink of an eye (as my match play opponent will readily testify with regard to his playing partner). Conditioning on the course was quite remarkable considering the weather we have had for months now and hats off to the green keeping staff that were obviously busy relining or re-edging many of the bunkers during the winter. The Kintyre might not be at the level of its world class sibling next door (what courses in the UK can come close to matching its majesty?) but it’s still capable of supplying a very enjoyable round of links golf. Jim McCann
March 08, 2011
8 / 10
Reviewer Score:
TaylorMade

Respond to above review
  Was this review helpful?
0 people found this review helpful

Response
Andy-Webbo
I will not fall into the trap as others in reviewing this course by comparing it with the Ailsa Craig course; to me it is simply not fair to do so. I played this course on Friday 29th October, in what I would call perfect conditions for the true Scottish Links experience, namely a forty to fifty miles per hour wind and driving rain that hurt your face. The rain started on the second tee and simply didn’t stop. The starter said on the first tee that it was stronger than when play was suspended in the Open, when it was held there in 2009. He continued that he thought they were pampered and that there was a club medal on today and all the members would play.

We were a fourball and allowed to play off the white tee which was nice. The opening hole is a very nice par five with a beautifully crafted water hazard that runs just at that awkward distance to lay up with your second shot. The green is difficult and contoured and well protected. The second a mid length par three and with the wind the line was a good forty yards to the right. The holes on the run to the turn are all classic links type with good bunkering and plenty of gorse to punish the wayward drive. Certainly the course is a real test at the turn. The eighth is real beauty with the green in a cove less than three hundred yards away. The green itself is very picturesque and if it was moved to the west coast of the USA alongside the other holes at Pebble Beach, would not look out of place, yes it really is that good even in the wind and rain. The next was straight into the wind. The tee shot is nervy enough but into a wind its worse.

By this time the wind was so strong it would support your weight and you could not hit a driver further than two hundred yards off the tee. I could hit a low running six iron as far. As you go out and back with nine and ten the view along the coast is fantastic. As you play the tenth you drop down into the main body of the course offering a bit more protection from the elements whilst still remaining a test. As you cross part of the old runways that still remain the course returns to the gorse and the holes are well set out. The closing hole is a par five as at the start and is a beauty, great bunkering with a wickedly designed green. When a professional tournament is held here then there will be drama on this hole.

The Kintyre for a course only ten years old is amazing. It is designed in a way to keep the links feel all the way around. The condition was superb and the greens held up well and were firm and fast. Despite the torrential rain there were only a few patches of standing water. As we came off the last green the rain became even stronger and became flooded in minutes. Amazingly enough by morning it was cleared and payable easily! The Kintyre if it was anywhere else would be a course worthy of a very high ranking indeed. I have a big problem accepting that it is not in the top 100 in the British Isles now. I cannot think of 100 better courses than this one and if Cruden Bay, Nefyn and the like are in then why not this? Great course go and play it. AW
November 21, 2010
8 / 10
Reviewer Score:
TaylorMade

Respond to above review
  Was this review helpful?
0 people found this review helpful

Response
stephen smith
December 27, 2010
Me and my son have subscribed to bunkered and will be playing this course in the summer. and after reading your review, we cant wait. i only hope we miss out on the 50mph winds! However, anything has got to be better than this snow we have at the moment.
Rainer
I played the course in September 2009. It is a very good course, but of course not as spectacular as the Ailsa. Hole 8 is awesome and the signature hole from my perspective. The course was in great shape and the greens were very fast. It is a very solid links course!
February 09, 2010
8 / 10
Reviewer Score:
TaylorMade

Respond to above review
  Was this review helpful?
0 people found this review helpful

Response
Ronan O'Driscoll
The Kintyre is an excellent course overall and very different to the Ailsa. Unlike it's big brother, approach shots are more likely to be played with a short iron rather than a 3-wood. The 8th hole must be one of the most beautiful holes anywhere in golf. There is lots and lots of gorse, but if you drive straight, you will score well. Kintyre reminded me of the New Course in St. Andrews.
October 20, 2009
6 / 10
Reviewer Score:
TaylorMade

Respond to above review
  Was this review helpful?
0 people found this review helpful

Response
Dan Hare
I must preface my comments with the fact that I have played the Kintyre twice as part of a stay and play package with the Ailsa so it always felt like a bonus round. Great fun with a group with sharing a house on the estate and great value too. That said, the Kintyre is a great fun course that is a true challenge in the conditions - partially soaking and a howling gale both times ! The 8th over the stone to the seaside is one of the most spectacular I have ever played, and didnt par it either time. Next drive is super too. Well worth playing, but would feel disappointed if I didn't get a game on Ailsa at the same time.
August 10, 2009
8 / 10
Reviewer Score:
TaylorMade

Respond to above review
  Was this review helpful?
0 people found this review helpful

Response
mike J
Played the Kintyre in August 2008. I was very disappointed. The course didn't represent value for money. I couldn't fault the welome and friendliness of the staff at Turnberry, but if the Kintyre wasn't located at Turnberry I feel it would hardly be worth mention. Save your money and play the Aisla
August 04, 2008
2 / 10
Reviewer Score:
TaylorMade

Respond to above review
  Was this review helpful?
0 people found this review helpful

Response
Gregor Clark
This course is a bit of a disappointment really and is nowhere like as high as 42nd in Scotland. The course is well presented but in the main (Bain's hill apart) is flat and uninpsiring.
March 31, 2008
6 / 10
Reviewer Score:
TaylorMade

Respond to above review
  Was this review helpful?
0 people found this review helpful

Response
allan mcmillan
I played this excellent course on a challenging day of gusting wind and squalls of heavy rain, and I enjoyed every minute! It is a very well designed course, with many varied hole layouts and the quality of the putting surfaces in December is superb.I really enjoyed playing down the par 5 18th, as I put all my best shots together to make birdie.The warm atmosphere of the lounge bar was very welcome after the 4 hour buffeting dished out to us on the golf course. I look forward to returning here.
December 28, 2007
8 / 10
Reviewer Score:
TaylorMade

Respond to above review
  Was this review helpful?
0 people found this review helpful

Response
John McPheson
Play it for the 8th hole alone. Good warm up for the Alisa.
September 05, 2007
6 / 10
Reviewer Score:
TaylorMade

Respond to above review
  Was this review helpful?
0 people found this review helpful

Response