Burnham Beeches - Buckinghamshire - England

Burnham Beeches Golf Club,
Green Lane,
Burnham,
Slough,
Buckinghamshire,
SL1 8EG,
England


  • +44 (0) 1628 661448

  • Golf Club Website

  • 2 miles NW of Slough

  • Welcome Monday – Friday only excluding bank Hols

  • Patrick Dawson

  • J H Taylor

  • Ronnie Bolton

Burnham Beeches is located in the Thames Valley to the south of the county of Buckinghamshire, some 25 miles to the west of London. The area, extending to 540 acres, is now a designated Site of Special Scientific Interest and also a National Nature Reserve. Acquired by the City of London in 1880 as open space for Victorian Londoners to enjoy, Burnham Beeches has remained a veritable oasis ever since.

Burnham Beeches Golf Club was founded in 1891 and Mike Berners Price fascinatingly describes its history in The Centurions of Golf. “In the early 1900s, more than a dozen teachers from Eaton College and a number of Dukes, Lords and Ladies helped to give the Club an exclusive air. In 1903, Raymond Hervey de Montmorency was elected Captain at the age of 28 playing off a handicap of plus-4. He later played golf for England and became President of the EGU in 1935. During a sporting weekend in 1904, he is said to have scored 72 for Oxford University against Rye at cricket on the Saturday with every run being a four and then repeated the score of 72 on the golf course the following day hitting eighteen fours!

J.H. Taylor advised on changes to the Burnham Beeches course in 1902 and 1907, the club faced possible lease problems and Taylor was asked for his views on a move to Stoke Park. In a response which would have surprised Harry Colt who designed the famous course at Stoke Park the following year, Taylor thought: “it was not suitable for a golf course as there are too many trees and, even if these were cleared, owing to the nature of the ground the golf would be of an uninteresting character.”

Burnham Beeches starts gently with a short par four that takes you away from the delightful old clubhouse with its cupola clock tower. But then the going gets tough at the 2nd with out of bounds all the down the right on this 424-yard hole which is one of six substantial par fours at Burnham Beeches. The par three 3rd is the easiest hole on the scorecard but such an apparently easy one-shot hole often results in a four on the card. The elevated tee shot on the 521-yard par five 4th is one of the most inviting in the county and it’s where even the most reserved golfer will be seriously tempted to grip it and rip it.

We’ll let Mike Berners Price bring Burnham Beeches to a conclusion: “Luke Donald set a four round course record of 270 (67, 68, 66, 69) in a regional amateur event in June 1997, and an earlier Ryder Cup player, Ken Bousfield, shot 69 in 1938 whilst completing a round in 91 minutes as par of a commercial challenge. He played a total of six rounds in three minutes over twelve hours with an average score of 72.5 and was sponsored by the advertising agency J Walter Thompson to promote a brand of cocoa which he was required to drink between rounds to prove its assistance for stamina. Members enjoyed a more potent drink in 1984 when the Club hosted the White Horse Whisky Challenge as part of the women’s professional tour.

Burnham Beeches is a well-wooded traditional parkland course providing one of the best tests of golf within easy reach of Central London.”
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Reviews for Burnham Beeches

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Description: Located on the south west edge of the ancient woodland site at Burnham Beeches, this golf club epitomises parkland golf at its best with tree-lined rolling fairways offering a challenging test over 18 holes. Rating: 5.3 out of 6 Reviews: 4

Played on a very pleasant September day. Great course, with several memorable long 4s and generous par 5s. Very few holes felt to be generous, but there were enough opportunities to score well. Very little rough or hazards so felt like a very good choice for society golfing. Will be back.

5 / 6
Burnham Beeches
September 22, 2016


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lovely members golf club and golf course.course in great condition and a fabulous J H Taylor design. every hole on it's own and set in beautiful surroundings, there is not a weak hole on the course. very under rated, one of the best courses in the county.
6 / 6
Burnham Beeches
March 09, 2012


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Nick
March 12, 2012
Yes, a very pleasant course. But, not a 6 ball course when making comparison with the great courses. Please can reviewers be more objective so that a reasonably sensible set of rankings is achieved?
If you’re in the Slough, Windsor area, this is a real MUST PLAY parkland golf course set in the middle of Burnham Beeches with many challenging par 4’s, 3 big par 5’s and 5 very scenic par 3’s. Burnham Beeches Golf Club is the oldest course in Buckinghamshire and a real traditional members golf club.At approx 6500 yards, it’s not massively long but a real challenge with many elevated tees and beautiful tree lined fairways. We considered the 2 signature holes to be the 10th ,a 175 yard par three with railway sleeper faced enormous bunker protecting a long slim green, and also the 14th a 430 yard par 4 which requires a well position drive in order to attack a hidden green set some 30 feet below the fairway.We found the course to be in excellent condition and beautifully to a very high standard.
6 / 6
Burnham Beeches
January 07, 2012


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Hugh
January 09, 2012
Nice course and worth playing but a 6-ball rating is rather too high and should be reserved for world ranked courses surely?
Golf has been played on the beautiful land at Burnham Beeches Golf Club for about 120 years and for a course designed then, there are plenty of plus points that are still great and trying to get near the par of 70 is certainly a challenge. This is very much a members club and that is where the club puts most attention – visitors and groups are very welcome but it is clear that the membership is paramount and whilst this is full (and it is) this feels ok. As I have said, this is quality land and comparable to Hertfordshire’s Ashridge GC with National Trust land all around. Another comparison can be made at the first hole (it is very similar to the opening hole at Surrey’s Coombe Hill) a short blind par-4 hole. The 2nd is a very strong par-4 with a right to left sloping fairway from the tee and the 3rd is a great looking downhill par-3. The remainder of the front nine has some good holes without being outstanding and can be described as ‘decent park-land golf’. The 10th is another pretty par-3 and includes a monster bunker short of the green complete with railway sleepers in the face. My choice of best hole on the course goes to the SI-1 hole, the 12th…a very tough drive through an avenue of trees and then a huge approach to this par-4 that turning left towards the green – there will definitely be more 6’s than 4’s here. A negative for me at the 14th. a long par-4 which starts ok but the approach is the problem, just a bit of a lottery really ….a carry is required over some dead ground where bushes are planted, I am sure even some decent shots will be punished, may need to play it a few times to understand what is going on. Great finishing hole though, a 435 yard toughie - I am glad I have played the course and will return next summer.
4 / 6
Burnham Beeches
October 16, 2011


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angus
August 05, 2012
I disagree that it is a lottery approach shot to the 14th hole at Burnham Beeches - a clear marker post is given at the back of the green to inform players of the correct line, on the tee it gives the pin position (although you may still walk up to the front of the drop in order to see the pin position. The ''dead ground where bushes are planted' does not come into play for an approaach shot, as they are far too low.''