Kingston Heath - Victoria - Australia

Kingston Heath Golf Club,
Kingston Road,
Cheltenham,
Victoria 3192,
Australia


  • +61 (0)3 9551 1955

  • Golf Club Website

  • 20 km S of Melbourne

  • Contact in advance - handicap certificate required


Australian Open Golf TrophyAustralian Open winners at Kingston Heath Golf Club:


Aaron Baddeley (Aus) 2000,
Greg Norman (Aus) 1995,
Peter Senior (Aus) 1989,
Peter Fowler (Aus) 1983,
Gary Player (SA) 1970,
Frank Phillips (Aus) 1957,
Ossie Pickworth (Aus) 1948.

Kingston Heath Golf Club pushes Royal Melbourne – and in some opinions exceeds it – as the premier course in Australian golf. The West course at Royal Melbourne gets all the accolades, but Kingston Heath's pure 18-hole layout could be even better than its neighbour. We'll leave that debate to you.

Dan Soutar designed Kingston Heath in 1925 and the course is located in the famous sand belt region of Melbourne. The famed Dr Alister MacKenzie was also brought in to offer bunker advice and guidance. In the view of many, he created the best natural bunkering one would ever wish to encounter. MacKenzie also suggested some minor alterations to the original Soutar layout, including turning the 15th from a short par four into a medium par three – and what a par three it is! The deep bunkers tend to overwhelm the small target and you should definitely try and avoid them by hitting the green at all costs.

The challenge begins with a demanding long par four, which is soon followed by Kingston Heath's shortest par four and the variation in length is compelling to say the least. Both can be equally damaging to the scorecard and the latter proves that a dual combination of tight bunkering and slick greens can be just as lethal as length. Modern course designers tend to forget about the strength of a tactical short par four, believing that length is necessary to combat modern day equipment. When we encounter the 3rd at Kingston Heath, we realise that nothing can be further from the truth. It is the ultimate risk and reward hole and always leaves an indelible impression on those who try and overpower it – either successfully or unsuccessfully.

The same can be said for the rest of the course, as Kingston Heath is an ultimate example of strategic golf. The long par four 6th, which runs parallel to the 1st and heads back towards the clubhouse, is one of the best par fours in the country.

The last five finishing holes are probably, as a collection, the best in all Australian championship golf. The strategic par five 14th is followed by the mercurial par three 15th. You’re then faced with three long par fours, all around the 400-metre mark. The dogleg right par four 16th is followed by a blind par four 17th with no bunkers surrounding the green. A tough and long par four finishes off your round. These holes will ask questions of you and they require all facets of your game combined into three words: pinpoint accurate golf.

Kingston Heath is a classic design that has stood the test of time and it certainly rates among the best courses in Australia and the world. With nearby neighbours such as Royal Melbourne (West and East), Metropolitan, Victoria and Commonwealth to name a few, we think that you will find no better place in Australia to play golf than here on Melbourne's sand belt.

For 30 years, the Australian Masters was held at Huntingdale Golf Club in Victoria, but in 2009 the event was switched to Kingston Heath. The 2009 event saw world No.1, Tiger Woods, aiming to win his first ever stroke play title in Australia. After a final round 68, Woods lifted the 2009 Australian Masters title, and joked, “now I've won on every continent, except for Antarctica”. Woods went on to say: “All the guys have raved about this golf course and I understand why. I really enjoy playing on sandbelt courses because it brings back shot-making and we don't see enough of that.”

The World Cup of golf visited Kingston Heath in 2016 and the Danish duo, Søren Kjeldsen and Thorbjørn Olesen, dominated the event to claim Denmark’s first World Cup triumph. The Danes carded an astonishing 12-under par 60 in strong southwesterly winds on Friday, by which time Kjeldsen had fallen under Kingston Heath’s spell: “This is my favorite type of golf. You've got to control the ball and look at the angles. You don't just get up and whack it, you've got to think your way around.”

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Reviews for Kingston Heath

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Description: Kingston Heath Golf Club pushes Royal Melbourne – and in some opinions exceeds it – as the premier course in Australian golf. Rating: 9.4 out of 10 Reviews: 18
TaylorMade
Shane Derby

Despite not playing particularly well, I was struck by the ultra-strategic nature of the bunkering at KH. The golf course afforded me a truly spiritual experience which was dished out to me in spades. Delight and terror, in equal measure, made for often uneasy bedfellows from the first drive until last putt. To expand, I could see exactly what I had to do, however, I could also see the peril that would be visited upon me if I engaged in either a decision or execution error . Throughout the round you consistently feel like you are being mugged by a super model when you either select the wrong club or fail to execute your planned shot.

While all of the holes are truly exceptional, the par 3’s take centre stage at KH with special mention going to both the 6th and 15th holes. Superlatives do not do these beauties justice!

Recently viewing some pictures of KH from the 1970’s, it is remarkable to contrast how the course looks now compared to how over grown and confined it was prior a program of tree and t-tree removal. In an often told story some original MacKenzie/Morcom bunkers were found underneath a wild expanse of dense undergrowth to the side of one of the fairways on the back nine, not to mention some original bunkering that had been filled and replaced by trees!

The best advice I could offer visitors to this golfing mecca is to try to play the course a few times to truly get comfortable with playing lines, strategic misses and turf conditions (which I can confirm, differ significantly, with the links conditions we generally find in Ireland and the UK).

Upon reflection, I now believe that KH’s compact and perfectly formed surroundings feed masterfully into its ‘sense of place’ using the exceptional reinstated bunkering, seamless routing and unsurpassed elegance to lure the golfer into what surely must be paradise.

I look forward to a return visit some day, once international travel restrictions are lifted. KH remains firmly at or near the top of my continuing worldwide bucket list.

For more information on my Australian golfing adventure, please click the following link: The Long Road to Van Diemen's Land

September 22, 2020
9 / 10
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Colin Braithwaite

Kingston Heath dates back to 1925 and I was told that it was originally a par 82. Based upon the acreage that seems a bit of a stretch and may be a yarn, but interesting. Dan Soutar was the original designer with an assist on the bunkering from Alister McKenzie. It is a classic Australian Sandbelt design.

The first hole, while long, is also wide open, other than bunkering down the right side. Favor the left off the tee. Kingston Heath alternates par 3s. When I played #2 was open and #5 was closed. Alternate #2, while short, is well protected with an assortment of bunkers. The 3rd and 4th are excellent birdie opptys. The relatively short par 4 3rd is a slight dogleg left. Aim down the right side of the left fairway bunker complex and you should have a flip wedge to the green. The 4th is driveable, but well protected on the right by fairway and greenside bunkers. While I admire going for it the margin of error is miniscule, the best play is left. The 5th hole is all about the pin location. I was fortunate, as the pin was up. The most demanding pin location is back right, which brings the greenside bunkers on the right into play. The alternate #5 is mid-length with a boatload of bunkers right and one left of the green. The 6th is a long par 4 with a boatload of bunkers. As there are 8 fairway bunkers right, the natural tendency will be to favor the left. Alas, there is a BAB there also. Hopefully, you will not have to extricate yourself from these bunkers, be wary as there are 4 more greenside right and just to keep it interesting there is also one left. Tough hole. The7th is the shortest par 5, pretty straight and reachable in two. Favor the left off the tee, to set up the green light second shot. The 8th is a long difficult par 4. Slight dogleg right with fairway bunkers on the inside elbow. It is a large double green with 17 and there is a plethora of greenside bunkers left. The front finishes with my favorite hole. Short par 4 slight dogleg left. Favor the left off the tee, a decent drive will give you a flip wedge, however, big hitters should either play to the right or leave their driver in the bag as there are 3 bunkers on the inside elbow.

The back starts with a short par 3. It is protected by bunkers front right and left. It is a quasi-tabletop green. The 11th bends slightly right. All the trouble is right. Ideal tee shot is left of the pot bunker in the middle of the fairway. The 12th is par five. There are two large fairway bunkers in the middle of the fairway, left is better. On the second shot aim at the right greenside bunkers, the left fairway bunker did me in. The short 13th is a good birdie oppty, especially if the pin is in the front. Most of the trouble is left off the tee. The 14th is an excellent par 5. There are a dozen or so bunkers on the right. Big hitters may be able to get home if the favor the right side. For the rest of us, aim further right than you think, as the fairway lists left and you do not want to end up in those bunkers either. The 15th is considered the de facto signature hole. A lamb chop shaped green that is protected by greenside bunkers left and right. Classic par 3. The finishing holes at Kingston Heath are not for the faint of heart. The 16th is a big slinger right. Off the tee the ideal line is over the left side of the furthest left bunker on the right side. You can drive through this fairway. This is one of the more accessible greens. The 17th heads left, is uphill, long and has 7 bunkers on the inside elbow. Favor the right off the tee. The 18th is long and straight. The fairway is generous until you get to the landing zone, where the large fairway bunker is a ball devourer. This is one of the larger greens.

Kingston Heath does not disappoint.

February 04, 2020
9 / 10
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Mark White

In February, 2019 I finally was able to play Kingston Heath and I played it twice. The first time I played with two members, one a former tour pro, and the second was part of an outing. Obviously I enjoyed the first time more as the members told me so much about the history of the golf course, the holes themselves, and I had the added benefit of seeing how a truly good player would play on this course. On average, off the tee the former pro was 75-90 yards ahead of me while our other playing partner was slightly shorter than me. It was a very good way to evaluate the golf course.

I will start by saying that I would prefer to be a member of The Royal Melbourne Club simply because they have two golf courses of which one is certainly in the top ten in the world. However, if one is a member of Kingston Heath one is truly blessed. In the UK I suppose the equivalent might be Sunningdale versus Swinley Forest. In the USA the equivalent would be Winged Foot versus Sleepy Hollow or Quaker Ridge.

Kingston Heath is a stunning golf course offering everything one would ever want in a golf course.

There are some marvelous holes at Kingston Heath, outstanding fairway and green side bunkering and good undulations in the greens. It is a terrific routing that moves one around in various directions. It also has a wide variety of short and long par 4’s and a really fun and special collection of par 3’s. Arguably one of the best par 3’s is the extra hole, which is put in play when another hole is closed for renovation.

I was asked whether Kingston Heath is the best golf course on a flat piece of land. It isn’t quite flat the way Chicago GC is because KH has a couple of rises. It is also not as wide open as Chicago as most of the holes are framed by trees or bushes. So in that sense you can’t compare them, but even if you did I think Chicago is the superior course on a flat piece of land.

This is often mistaken as a Alistair Mackenzie design but it is not. Mackenzie actually spent only a couple of hours here on a one time visit. The routing was already completed, and Mackenzie walked the golf course with a sketch pad and said where to place the bunkers. That was the extent of his involvement. Des Soutar designed Kingston Heath and Mike Morcom built the course and bunkers. The bunkers are the real key to Kingston Heath, they are often long and sinewy, sometimes kept trim but also some are rugged. It is a splendid variety of bunkering. They don’t quite dip right into the edge as much as Metropolitan nor are often as raised as at the West course at Royal Melbourne, but they are plentiful and always a danger.

In my notes on Kingston Heath, I liked holes 7-10, 13, and 14-18 with the famed par 3 15th a particular highlight as the green is elevated and has slants and tilts going every which way. It is sort of a blind tee shot. 15 is a “fair” hole despite one's ability to get into substantial trouble. The par 5's offer birdie chances to the long hitters but one can easily end up with a triple bogey.

We played the tees at 6219 meters or approximately 6800 yards.

The first is a par 4 of 457 yards straight forward to a generous fairway, nearly dead flat, with trees wide left and a set of bunkers creeping in from the right that were in play for me but not for the pro. The green has some slight undulations although the front right bunkers are to be avoided. There are swales off the left side of the green but they are not difficult. This is one of the easier longer par 4’s.

The bonus hole par 3 is likely one of the best holes on the course. It plays 155 yards to a slanted green back to front and bunkers surrounded it. The green was slightly raised. It would be an incredible hole on the course if always in play.

The second hole is a short dogleg left par 4 of 384 yards. A lengthy series of bunkers guards the left side. The long hitter in my group flew right over them with ease. I played out to the right leaving a longer shot with a difficult angle back into the green which has two large bunkers left and two smaller bunkers right. The green has subtle movement to it as well as a fall-off area in the rear.

The par 4 third hole at 300 yards is really cute requiring a shot to the green that must be perfectly judged to clear the bunker fronting the green. This is a slight dogleg to the right. There is a roll off area back and right. The green tilts right to left as well as back to front in spots. You simply cannot go long here as a recovery chip is very difficult to get close.

The par 4 fourth hole of 392 yards posed no trouble for the long hitter in our group who took a hybrid and left it 140 yards out. Trees and a waste sand area guard the right side while the left side on this dogleg right has a larger collection of bunkers in the fairway. The green has seven bunkers right that end against the front right edge as well as a large bunker left. There is a depression in the green right behind the bunkers right as well as trees behind the green for additional defense for the hole.

Before better players could hit the ball so far I imagine these three holes were difficult starting holes. But if the longer player has confidence in their driver they can get very close to the green. The shorter hitter simply must find the fairway and there is ample room on all three holes to do so.

The fifth is a longer par 3 of 187 yards that has a sandy waste area and a fairway bunker well short of a landing area in front of the green. There really is no room to miss on this hole as the tee shot must be perfectly judged. There are five bunkers left that seemingly get larger as you get closer to the green as well as a bunker left that bleeds into the trees there. There are trees fairly close behind the green. The green is slightly tilted back to front with both sides sloped to those bunkers. I do not think this par 3 is as good as the “bonus” par 3 behind the first green, but on most other courses it would likely be the best par 3.

The sixth is a longer par 4 of 418 yards that is straight forward back at the club house with fairway bunkers ad trees left and right to be avoided on the tee shot, an area of sandy waste area, mounds and bunkers on the right short of the green that chase up right to the front edge and a bunker left short of the green, The green is raised with slopes left, back, and back right and is very titled. It is easily the most difficult green so far on the golf course given the tilts and slants.

The seventh is the first par five on the golf course at 504 yards. It is short but feels very narrow as the fairway is tree lined most of the way to the green. There are fairway bunkers left that creep into the fairway for those who typically fade the ball and perhaps hit a straight shot. As you approach the green more bunkers on the right come into play for the shorter hitter while the longer hitter contends with bunkers on the front left of the green as well as a bunker on the right that spans the entire right side of the green. There is ample room in front of the green to run a shot on. It is a cleverly designed hole. If one does not try too hard on this hole, then a par is likely, but the slightest missed shot will likely find danger. This is a birdie or eagle chance for the long hitter.

The eighth once again is tree lined some of the right side but all the left side so the miss is to the right where a wide opening can be found. However a large tree blocks one’s way to recover from missing the fairway to the right with other trees between you and the green. So if one missed too far to the right you have a blind shot to the green and you have to consider pitching back to the fairway. There are bunkers surrounding this tree as well. This slightly dogleg right has numerous bunkers fronting the green which is thin and narrow and difficult to hit on this 435 yard par 4. There are six bunkers left sort of mounded that end at the edge of the green and three bunkers right with a slight gap between them and the green. I found this to be a hole with a lot of challenge to it, beautifully designed and very well defended. The green is joined with the sixteenth green.

The ninth is a short par 4 that is very tree lined, particularly left on this dogleg left. The fairway has bunkers on the left side that cut off a third of the fairway for those trying to shorten the hole. The former pro drove it to the right with a 5 iron where there is ample space. There are an additional 3 bunkers left that should not come into play as they are well short of the green and two bunkers on the right and one back left of the green. The green is relatively flat but does not hold approach shots unless they are hit high to land softly. The back right side of the green pushes right against the trees and bushes. It is a genius short par 4.

The tenth hole is a par 3 of 140 yards clearing a waste area. The green is elevated surrounded by bunkers on either side. The front of the green narrows about 15% versus the rest of this already skinny, but deep green. There is a spine in the front section of this green tilting it back to front. This is a fabulous short par 3.

The 435 yard par four eleventh has a fairway that narrows for the longer hitter. For a shorter hitter there is ample room despite the tree lined fairways that have sand underneath them all the way in. There is a fairway bunker right to navigate as well. There are six bunkers beginning well short of the right side of the green that cut into that right side. The green is crowned with run-offs on either side. It is a difficult hole but one that I found visually was not at the same level as the holes just played, perhaps because behind the green it is more open with the exception of a single tree.

Twelve is a 557 yard par five with two fairway bunkers in the middle of the hole. The one interesting thing about these bunkers is that playing to either side does not provide an advantage over the other side. This slight dogleg left has another large collection of bunkers about 100 yards out from the green on the left. There are three bunkers on the right well short of the green and one left right against the green. You can run a shot onto the green on this hole and I found the green to be easier than some others. Visually this is a really pretty hole as it is one of the few times you see a parallel fairway.

I loved the thirteenth hole, a short par 4 of 353 yards that has fairway bunkers to navigate on either side and a large fairway bunker on the front right and back left. The green continues on the right beyond the bunker and is raised. You simply cannot miss long or to the right. The green is slanted back to front and has a ridge separating it about a third of the way from the left.

Fourteen is the longest par 5 at 564 yards with a generous landing area. It is a straight hole that requires a second shot to miss the five bunkers and trees on the right with one’s second shot. The bunkers are raised and are some of the most difficult bunkers on the golf course. They seemingly never end. There are additional bunkers on the left side that ultimately end at the green including a bunker that might be the biggest on the golf course. The green is raised slightly but not difficult. Trees line the back to catch a shot hit with too much pace.

Now it is on the famous fifteenth, a par 3 of 141 yards to a very raised green on the only “hill” on the golf course. There is a long stretch of waste area down the right side that does not come into play but add to the beauty of the golf hole. There are two bunkers left and four to the right of the green. The green is small and has a narrow opening. It has a wonderful set of pitches to it near those bunkers. The green side bunkers spill down both sides of the hill. Both times I made 3 here but I did witness the “pro” hit out of a bunker on the right with his feet outside the sand and his ball near the lip. It was a blind shot and the pin was in the narrowest par of the green with those bunkers opposite. He hit it to one foot. I am glad I witnessed such a wonderful shot because it proved to me that those bunkers were not impossible. This is considered to be one of the finest par 3’s in the world and I would certainly reference it that way.

The sixteenth is a 435 yard par 4 that doglegs to the right. There are four bunkers down the right side to catch the longer hitter. There is a series of bunkers on the right to this narrow green which shares the green with the eighth hole.

The seventeenth is the longest par 4 on the course at 460 yards, a hole bending to the left, tree lined and eight bunkers all down the left to the turn in the hole pinching the fairway much smaller. The amazing part of the hole is that there are no bunkers around the green with trees back right but a wide opening to the left and back left of the green as the hole blends into the forward tees for the final hole. I thought about this hole a lot after the first round but after playing it a second time I really liked it.

The 427 yard par 4 finishing hole is a gem. After hitting over a waste area and with trees lining this fairway, one finds bunkers on the left side that pinch almost halfway across the fairway, narrowing the options for the longer hitter. The green is protected by a large bunker left and two bunkers right and is raised with one of the more undulating greens.

The only criticisms one could say about Kingston Heath is that advances in golf technology has changed how one plays the golf course. There are no truly overly long par 3’s, par 4’s or par 5’s to challenge the top players. The greens while having good variation and slope to them, are well defended by bunkers, but don’t have enough greens with “sections” that other top golf courses have with their greens. Some greens are like this, but not enough.

That is about it from a negative standpoint.

The course is visually spectacular and for an almost flat piece of land it is routed beautifully. It is extremely well defended and has a very good mix of holes that turn one way or the other. The greens are well defended. The par 3’s are outstanding, particularly the magnificent fifteenth hole. But it doesn’t have another hole as good as many of the holes at Royal Melbourne West or East.

Kingston Heath would be the best course to be a member in Australia if it were not for the two courses at The Royal Melbourne Club. I think it is slightly overstated if one says it is the finest course in the Sandbelt, but there is no question it belongs amongst the world's best. I would enjoy playing this golf course every single round and also likely find something new about the course most of those rounds such as a putting line, a bush I did not see, an edge to a bunker that I did not take into account, or even a tree I hadn’t noticed. It is splendid.

October 25, 2019
9 / 10
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Peter Wood

There are many who regard Kingston Heath as the premier course in Australia. Whilst I regard the course highly, I don't rate it quite that well. Nevertheless there is some magnificent golfing landscape here.

The par 3's are sublime with the short uphill 15th being one of the great one shotters in world golf. Apparently this was MacKenzie's one major contribution to the Soutar routing – and he picked a beauty! The green complex and bunkering is spectacular and scary at the same time! Play this hole over Melbourne's summer with the greens firm and fast and a north wind blowing and you will work hard to earn your par. The bunkering is deep and will swallow the slightest mishit. If you go long – good luck climbing back up on the green and stopping the Kingston Heath Golf Course - Photo by reviewer ball from there! The green surface is firm and fast and demands a deft touch. I love that hole!

The par 3 tenth hole is also a favourite with another lovely green surrounded by MacKenzie bunkers – all located in a heathland setting. There are long grasses and shrubbery to carry all the way from the tee.

Perhaps my favourite hole at KH is the short par 4, third hole. Tight off the tee, but driveable for the long hitters, the third can be an easy birdie, or the hole that wipes you out. On the tee the decision can range from driver to mid iron – but whatever you decide you must plot your way based on where the flag is positioned, and where you should approach from – there are so many options, and so many ways to come unstuck!

In summary Kingston Heath is one of the world's best golf courses. It is known for being a remarkable and enduring championship course on a small plot of land, renowned for its spectacular MacKenzie bunkering, and for being a beautifully groomed course.

The course is not long by modern standards, and all level of golfer will enjoy the opportunity to play, and relish the test provided by such a championship course.

Peter Wood is the founder of The Travelling Golfer – click the link to read his full review.

January 06, 2019
10 / 10
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Tyson Flynn

No. 2 ranked course in Australia and for good reason. Beautifully designed by Soutar and MacKenzie in 1925. From the moment I entered the front gate, to having my bag taken to the pro shop, to receiving wonderful token gifts and a photo from the staff of me standing at the starters box to a beer at the end of my round, all the hype surrounding 'the Heath is justified.

Absolutely perfect day had on the 2nd best course in Australia in my opinion! No wonder it's held every major golfing event :) It's easy to walk around this course that sits on such a rich sandy base. Not a lot of elevation change to this course as is the case with most of the sandbelt courses, but the routing and design of the holes are what makes it truly world class.

The course has great holes everywhere, no more so than on the run home, at the 142m Par 3 15th, design heaven is seen from every angle. The bunkering at KH is outstanding in terms of design and the quality of each one, good depth, quality of sand. This is only one of the dangers as the razor edge greens attached to them play generally very quick with bunker to bunker shots more than likely if the golfer gets it wrong. Undulating and great sized greens make for the beautiful make up of this world class course. Tys.

May 29, 2018
10 / 10
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David Davis

10 years ago I played Kingston Heath for the first time along with 14 other top courses in Australia all in one long trip. Back then it was my favorite course of the ones I had seen in the entire country. Recently I was back Down Under for a new adventure and it all started with a repeat visit to Kingston Heath Golf Course - Photo by reviewer Kingston Heath and yes indeed, it’s still my favorite course in Australia. Most will argue Royal Melbourne is the superior routing and better golf landscape ever so slightly and they would be correct. However, Kingston Heath is the ultimate example of how wonderful truly firm and fast conditions can be on a golf course. Short for today’s standards, KH is all about strategic options, driver is most certainly not the play on many of the holes, wind is usually an added challenge and putting is scary fast.

Kingston Heath Golf Course - Photo by reviewer

Kingston Heath is graced with some of the most amazing greens and greenside bunkering of any course in the world. Bunkers run into the greens like no other course. There is a seamless natural transition not just of greens and bunkers but also the surrounds. The day’s pin positions will most certainly dictate the strategy of which angles need to be utilized in order to approach the greens from the correct angles. The turf being of fine grasses is some of the best and most fun turf to play on in the world. The ground game is essential as is making sure you land the approaches well short in order to gauge their roll out otherwise shots will simply run through the green. Kingston Heath truly has 18 great holes. Naturally there are a couple more famous ones like the par 3 16th with its all-world bunkering and crazy Kingston Heath Golf Course - Photo by reviewer narrow green leaving a daunting tee shot or extremely tough recovery shot.

On top of all this Kingston Heath’s routing makes it one of the best and most pleasant walks in all of golf. It’s the perfect way to spend any day on the links as far as I’m concerned and it’s hard to imagine a Top 20 World course being underrated but this may just be the case with Kingston Heath. If you ever have a chance to experience it make sure you jump on it. It’s really that good!

June 14, 2017
10 / 10
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Fergal O'Leary

I developed a deeper love for Kingston Heath on this trip and was fortunate to play it on three occasions with various Pennant (interclub team scratch match play competition) level members. Although on a flatter piece of land, the strategy for ball placement is truly paramount in order to get the best angle into the greens. MacKenzie continually asks golfers to hit the ball as close to hazards/bunkers/doglegs as possible. Of all the golf courses in the Sandbelt, I would hands-down choose to play Kingston Heath the most. The simplicity of its creation married with the genius of the strategy to negotiate each hole, offers up what I consider to be the greatest course in Melbourne. No matter which way the wind blows, no two rounds are the same and this old lady deservedly wears a crown.

Fergal O’Leary returns to the land down under

January 22, 2017
10 / 10
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John Sabino

The Australian and five-time British Open Champion Peter Thomson is a big fan of Kingston Heath’s third hole, which is an 269 meter yard par four. He says, "holes of this length are not built any more - a pity. This one is a gem. In this day and age it can be driven, although the possibility must be ten or more to one against. For this reason, the penalties for missing the target should be more severe, this enhancing the challenge."

Planet Golf also feels that the best hole of all at Kingston Heath is the drivable but dangerous third because the shallow green is angled to accept only the most precise pitch shots.

Thomson is also a big fan of the fifth hole, a 173-meter par three. “The threes here at Kingston Heath are very much the heart of the course, and this one is the first of three beauties. The original natural bumps and hollows have been preserved blessedly."

The bunkers at Kingston Heath are penal since the sand is shallow and many have high lips and a green that slopes away from your shot.

Tom Doak compares Kingston Heath to Merion in that it is a strategic design on a tight piece of land and has a similar great use of only about 125 acres. Combined with the intricate bunkering, it makes a compelling golf course. I whole heartedly agree.

John Sabino is the author of How to Play the World’s Most Exclusive Golf Clubs

November 28, 2016
6 / 10
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Robin McCall

This course is rated no 2 in Australia and 17 in the world and it has been my privilege to play the course 7 times over the last 4 years, and from start to finish it is a severe test not of brawn but of brain. The first tee shot is the easiest that you are going to get, a good wack over the ridge left of the bunker on the right will set you up, from then on direction on a target line is what is all about, the third is one of the best short par 4 that you will ever play and the 6th back to the clubhouse is the best hole on the course, treat the course as a severe examination paper, be conservative off the tee, keep the ball in play, enjoy the short 15th (6/7 iron from the tee), and if you get a 3, just run and get out of there, I have had 7 goes at it and haven't hit the green yet. For those of you that read this you have one problem, it is a private club and you must find a member to take you but be assured it will be a visit that you will always remember and the clubhouse and general ambiance is one of the best that you will ever encounter and the food is not bad either!

Robin McCall, The Berkshire.

September 03, 2016
10 / 10
Reviewer Score:
TaylorMade

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Warren
September 04, 2016

To quote directly from KH website..."Kingston Heath extends a warm welcome to international visitors ....".

If living in Aust you need to be a member of a reciprocal club..

paulofchester
I first played Kingston Heath in the 70's. Then it was a tea tree infested piece of land with narrow fairways. If you missed a fairway you were in the tea trees which were impenetrable. Lost balls and broken clubs abounded. It lived on reputation alone, and that was fast fading. Then, in the late 70's. after being awarded the Australian Open, the committee unearthed the old plans, cleared the tee tree away, found s many MacKenzie bunkers no one had seen in a generation, and a masterpiece was reborn. Whilst I will always prefer Victoria, Kingston Heath is a superior championship course and is a true expression of what sandbelt golf is all about. The par three are sublime, the fours are monsters - even the short ones can rack up a six without trying - and the fives give you every chance of a 4, and yet, before you know it you are walking off the green with bogey and wondering why. The fairways are perfect, crisp and the ball begs to be hit. The greens are as good as they get, and like the best sandbelt courses, full of fast borrows and interesting pin positions, whilst the bunkers will challenge the very best. For mortals like the rest of us, centre of the green is a good result from most greenside traps. The only quibble I have is the 17th which is blind and uninteresting. If you go to Melbourne, you must play this course and Victoria. You will never want to leave.
December 07, 2015
10 / 10
Reviewer Score:
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