Pennard - South Wales - Wales

Pennard Golf Club,
2 Southgate Road,
Southgate,
Swansea,
SA3 2BT,
Wales


  • +44 (0) 1792 233131


Visit Golfbreaks.com for a golf holiday at Pennard

Although Pennard Golf Club is located only a few miles southwest of Swansea, it’s set on the rugged Gower Peninsula, amongst one of the most dramatic landscapes in Britain. Its cliff-top site provides an ideal vantage point – from the heights, the views across to the beautiful sandy beaches of Three Cliff and Oxwich Bays are simply arresting.

Pennard is one of the oldest golf courses in Wales. Reputedly, golf has been played here since 1896, although the Pennard Golf Club was not founded until 1908. It’s often called “the links in the sky”, because the holes play across links-like ground, full of dunes, humps and hollows but the land is 200 feet above sea level.

The great James Braid originally designed Pennard, and, some years later, he returned with Ken Cotton to implement certain revisions. For many years, the unusual Pennard course was relatively anonymous until the great American architect, Tom Doak, declared in The Confidential Guide To Golf Courses, that Pennard is “One of my all-time favourites, but I hesitate to recommed it for gereral consumption; it's awfully quirky. The site, on a promontory of undulating ground between the sea and the 'Pill' (a deep stream valley), is one of the most spectacular I’ve ever seen.” Since Doak’s comments, the course has enjoyed a renaissance.

The ruins of a 12th century Norman Castle stand guard over the course, which measures a modest 6,329 yards from the back tees. It’s by no means a championship test, but there are 18 wonderful holes and Pennard has hosted a number of important amateur events. This is where the inspirational Curtis Cup player, Vicky Thomas, honed her game.

When the strong winds funnel up the Bristol Channel, Pennard will pose a stern challenge to the very best golfers. Don’t let your concentration be affected by the cattle, which graze on the links. Additionally, expect a few blind shots and don’t expect too many flat lies – Pennard is seriously hilly, with more ups and downs than most links courses.

One of the most engaging aspects of Pennard is that there are no average holes. Each and every one has character and there are at least nine great holes. The four par 4s from the 6th to the turn are simply tremendous. The short par four 7th, aptly called "Castle", will remain etched in the mind for a long time – from the elevated tee, the drive must bravely cross a deep chasm to find a distant undulating fairway. The ruins of PennardClick to find out why Steve is horizontal at Pennard Castle watch in silence. A semi-blind approach shot is to a sunken green, which is protected by dunes – fantastic stuff!

High up in the dunes once again, the tee shot from the 493-yard 16th, called "Great Tor", is also nerve-jangling. A solid drive to the rippled fairway below will leave a short, but blind, second shot across a ridge. The approach shot must find the green, perched on the cliff-top, which slopes wickedly from back to front. Don’t leave a downhill putt, or you may find yourself pitching back on to the green.

Pennard is a delightful old-fashioned affair and without doubt, this is one of the very best links courses in Britain & Ireland. No trip to South Wales would be complete without tasting the sheer delight of Pennard.

Tom Doak was appointed as Pennard’s consulting architect at the end of 2015 and his Scottish-based associate Clyde Johnson is working with Ecobunker on the installation of artificial revetted bunkers on the course. Doak will advise on the placement and shaping of the sand traps during the rebuilding programme.

We contacted Clyde Johnson in October 2017 to get his take on the renovation programme:

“Tom Doak and I made our last visit to Pennard in the winter of 2015/2016. The club had decided to re-build their second green without our input, and likewise have continued to do the bunker work on their own following Tom's initial report. I am not sure how much of our advice they heeded, but given the lack of involvement, I don't think there should be any accreditation (good or bad) on our behalf.

In truth, the bunker work was/is simply about replacing the turf revetted bunkers with the artificial turf construction process...with an interest for ensuring that these new bunkers did not appear homogenised as on many links courses, as they would be getting 'locked-in' for 20-plus years. There was to be consideration of moving the odd bunker, but nothing overly significant.

Regardless, it is the adventurous routing of Pennard, which sometimes lives on the edge, and a handful of wonderfully contoured green complexes that make it the best course in Wales, and one of the most compelling anywhere in the world.”

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Reviews for Pennard

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Description: Pennard Golf Club is a delightful old-fashioned affair and without doubt, this is one of the very best links courses in the British Isles. Rating: 8.3 out of 10 Reviews: 61
TaylorMade
Craig Tucker

Unique in every way. I haven’t played a course like this ever before. So many undulations, swales and burns i felt like I was in an episode of ‘Lord of the rings’.

I loved the course for the adventure and I think that I could play here a 1000 times and never be in the same place twice. The occasional sighting of a grazing cow and the need for an electric wire around every green and tee box made this course even more unique.

The greens were smooth and lovely and the design was a true Braid classic. I’d never get bored here.

Friendly informative staff and spectacular views over the sea and river mouth were delightful. The ‘links in the sky’ did not in any way disappoint.

Thanks

October 30, 2019
8 / 10
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Michael Frankel

10 days in Wales, where it always rains, but it didn't. Actually, a drought brought rock hard fairways, which are heaving and hard enough to hit when there's grass! Nonetheless, a spectacular down land course set on cliffs overlooking the sea. Fantastic holes and views! Great caddies! A unique design I'd love to play again under better conditions. Definitely for the links aficionado! It's a tough walk but it was so dry, they didn't let out carts! What could they have hurt?

October 20, 2019
8 / 10
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Stuart Eastwood

One piece of advice for any septuagenarian golfer with a dodgy knee… take a buggy! Walking Pennard was close to torture! The course is magnificent albeit you need to cope with many blind shots. Would love to play there again.

May 17, 2019
9 / 10
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Doug Roberts

Pennard- Having reviewed the Links Mag with Tom Doaks unloved featured, of which Pennard was the pictured course. A visit was in order. I had put together a SW English itinerary and upon reflection thought heck Royal Porthcawl and Pennard are just around the bend....So let's do it. I was quite fortunate to garner a clear brisk day while on the Pennard property. The views are fantastic. The visual appeal to golf probably holds more passion for me than many. I'm a voyeur of golf. Ha. Pennard has several holes which are one of a kinds...The par 3 13th is unlike any I have ever played. The green is situated at a spot which seems illogical. But it is fabulous. The course meanders thru the dunes with hardly a level lie anywhere. It is quirky with its electric fences to guard the greens. There are numerous poles to assist with direction on blind shots. This is just a fun fabulous course which is a must play. The cantilevered 18th fairway is insane. I can't wait to get back. Without a doubt Royal Porthcawl is the best of Wales...but Pennard is a close 2nd.

May 10, 2019
10 / 10
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Kevin Henley

Fabulous links high up on land by the sea.

Some superb holes. A great club.

April 30, 2019
10 / 10
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Freddie

My final day of my 3 day wales tour and what an unbelievable place to finish! Definitely ended on a high note as this truly is an awesome course, but be warned it will tire you out as it is extremely hilly. The views you get on this course are spectacular and before you even start your round you are treated to a magnificent view of the whole golf course. It gets its name of 'the links in the sky' for a good reason.

The back 9 in my opinion was the 9 that I preferred it had prettier holes and had a bit more of a linksy feel to it. Some of my favourite holes would have to be the par 4 7th, which is a signature hole as you hit towards Pennard Castle, what a great hole this is but unless you hit a long one up there you will be playing a tricky blind second shot and you do not want to leave it short as the green slopes away from you massively so you'll be left with a hard 3rd shot. Holes 12 through 18 are also fantastic, but a favourite hole of mine would have to be the 16th as it is right at the edge of the cliffs and is up there with the best views I have seen in all my time of golf.

The only reason why I would not say that this is a 6 ball course is because the condition isn't quite up there with Royal Porthcawl which I therefore preferred, but nonetheless this is a magnificent golf course well worth playing.

April 17, 2019
8 / 10
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Warren

An interesting course, quite stark in places. Reminded me somewhat of Connemara in Galway, Ireland. Barely a tree or scrub around and a desolate look and feel to it. Naturally these are great ingredients to have in a golf course. A rollicking course played over massive undulations and hills. Not really a heavily duned course and the blind shots are quite obvious – usually they are on long drives with the marker post maybe a 100-200m ahead of you so no real need to guess too much what you need to do. Some heavily sloped fairways means holding the ball on your intended line is impossible, especially in the fast, dusty conditions the summer of 2018 has presented.

The par 3s are tough with some long accurate shots required, otherwise run offs will severely punish any mis-hit or mis-clubbed shot. There are no poor holes and some great ones. The finish, like Pyle & kenfig, is long but with two of the last three holes par 5s, if you are not too tired from the walk, you do have some great opportunities to finish with a score.

This is the last course I have played in my 11 day tour of all links courses (except for Royal Porthcawl which was closed for a tournament and Swansea bay) and whilst not quite the best it was a strong course to finish on. Perranporth was the massive surprise packet and Weston – super-Mare and Channel course the disappointments. For the interested the following is my ranking of these 15 courses. Warren from Aust

1. Saunton East

2. Perranpoth

3. St Enodoc

4. Trevose

5. Pennard

6. Saunton West

7. Burnham & Berrow Championship

8. RND

9. Ashburnham

10. West Cornwall

11. Newquay

12. Bude

13. Weston-Super-Mare

14. Minehead

15. Burnham & Berrow Channel

September 18, 2018
8 / 10
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BB
September 20, 2018

Everyone loves a good list - thanks for sharing yours.

What a great (and pretty unique) trip you’ve completed.

Shame you couldn’t get on at Royal Porthcawl (did you tell them what you were up to? If so, it would be pretty cold-hearted not to have squeezed you on).

Where would you rank P&K amongst all these courses?

Warren
September 21, 2018

Yep, love a list. I did play P&K and it is in between RND and Ashburnham. Royal Porthcawl was off limits due to British Seniors Amateur Open.

David Baxter
September 22, 2018

An excellent list which reminds me there are a few on here that I haven't played and personally I would be trying to edge Pennard and Saunton West a little higher. Royal Porthcawl would go straight in at nr 1 (as the layout is fantastic) provided the greens were in good condition (not always the case). Swansea Bay is worth playing and has some good links holes but a bit like P&K there are some non-links style holes (on the clubhouse side of the main road). DB

T P Dean

Ah Pennard, you’ve truly found a place in my heart. What a stunning location. Situated 200 feet above sea level and offering glorious views across the Gower Peninsula and out to the Pill Estuary and Three Cliffs Bay, Pennard is every bit a true and genuine links. Set perfectly immersed within dunes, every single hole has an abundance of personality.

I admit that Pennard will divide opinion. Sure, the course Pennard Golf Course - Photo by reviewer may be a little agricultural in places, livestock can be found wandering the course at certain times of the year and although they weren’t erected when I played, I understand that a select number of greens are sometimes surrounded by fencing to guard from straying cattle. It’s not immaculately maintained in the way that Open rota courses are, but what a supreme layout this is. It may even be the best piece of land across which I’ve ever played golf.

Pennard shares lots of similarities with James Braid’s other designs at Perranporth and Brora which are also wonderful golfing landscapes and the course feels untouched and as Braid intended. Most holes are played blind, hitting towards marker posts to infinity fairways and hidden green sites. Wickedly undulating fairways merge into heavily contoured greens and the holes themselves are played across an assortment of directions. The course will cause confusion to most golfers experiencing the links for the first time; the 3rd tee for example, with no directional marker post in sight on this dogleg hole surrounded by shallow dunes, the fairway and green are largely hidden from view.

The 4th hole is where you’ll get your first real sight of the wonderful views on offer at Pennard. Don’t become too distracted though as this short par five asks questions of the golfer to find the right angles on each shot if you’re hoping to avoid an early meltdown. The plethora of humps and hollows that are a feature throughout the course begin to Pennard Golf Course - Photo by reviewer come into play on the 6th whilst the 7th, a hole that features a church wall to the left and ruins of a castle to the right has the most wonderfully awkward green complex. Making par at the testing 9th hole is a wonderful score whilst the par five 10th is characteristic of the eccentricities you’ll face at Pennard. Another hole that left me scratching my head on the tee to the point where I had to walk the first hundred yards of the fairway until I was sure of my strategy before hitting my tee shot. A six-iron from the tee followed by a hybrid-three into the elevated green ended up being the perfect play and an extremely satisfying birdie ensued. Quirky as this hole may be and surely not to everyone’s appetites, taking my bias from making birdie aside, I still found Pennard’s 10th to be an absolute beauty.

After this, the drama doesn’t let up and if anything gets turned up a notch. The 11th green is simply perched onto the side of a hill but approach with caution as this tiered green, complete with false front will spit the ball back at you if you’re not accurate for distance.

The slopes at Pennard aren’t subtle, typified by the 12th fairway that will repel any ball away to the right rough. In these burnt out Summer conditions, I could see no way of finding the fairway and this would be my one main criticism of the course with the 18th fairway also being similarly angled. Yet another severe slope greets you on the 13th, this time a par three so only the poor shots go punished here, but no matter what the quality of your tee shot, breathe in the wonderful views of the clifftop campsite and beach in the distance that will surely soften the blow of any poorly timed golf shot.

Signature holes then keep coming head-on, 14 with its massive humps in the fairway, some of which are over 10’ high, playing sharply uphill to a raised green. Then 15, a par three on top of the hill that Pennard Golf Course - Photo by reviewer plays to a tremendous peanut shaped green. 16 is a stunner and the first of two back to back par fives playing out to the corner of the cliff whilst the scenery from the 17th tee is equally breath-taking. I had to wait for the group in front here to clear so was able to soak in the soft afternoon light across the sea and watch horses go trotting along the beach. What a sight.

Once ready and when the group in front rings the bell, you’ll find that the 17th snakes in a double dogleg shape around gorse. I found myself out of position with my tee shot here and discovered the hole to be overly penal; it’s tight, blind and unforgiving. Plop; into the gorse my ball went and my first lost ball. It was the end of my score, but it didn’t dampen my spirits about the quality of this wonderful course. There’s just nothing pretentious about Pennard, and that’s why I loved it. Pennard speaks to my tastes; it’s absolutely my cup of tea, and make that a big mug of welsh brew with a chocolate biscuit on the side.

Pennard might well be known for being the “Links in the Sky” but even that description alone doesn’t quite do the course justice, Pennard is as beautiful as it is dramatic and, in my opinion, one of the finest links courses in the UK.

By the way, did I mention the views?

July 12, 2018
9 / 10
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David Baxter
July 13, 2018

nice review ! fab course .. should it be higher in the top 100 UK rankings ?

T P Dean
July 13, 2018

I'll leave that to better educated folk than me to decide David, but I'd have it in my personal top 10 and the equal of some World Top 100 courses that I've played.

M J Smyth

Pennard Golf Club is also referred to as ‘The Links In the Sky’ and with good reason given its lofty location 200 feet above sea level on the rugged and picturesque Gower Peninsula. We teed off on a sunny afternoon just after 2pm in mid May with the cows looking on intently to our blind approach to the 1st green. A strong opening hole off our chosen (white) tees of the day was followed by a gentle par 3 before the real test began. SI 3 third hole was a dog leg left that had two sucker bunkers on the tiger line, one of which I found and it was a typical penal Braid bunker. Teeing off at the iconic 16th - Pennard - Photo by reviewer The par 3 fifth hole really needs an accurate tee shot to secure a par, my ball started left with a hook and sadly might well have ended up on the beach. ‘Castle’ 7th hole has an inviting tee shot but I ended up behind the old church wall pulling off a Seve esk approach only to three putt but fear not the breath taking view from this green towards the majestic Castle ruins perched on the hill more than made up for it. The approach to the ninth was typical Braid in that he offers you different ways to play the shot, knock down or fly it, I got caught somewhere in the middle and paid the price with another bogey.

The tee shot at the par 5 tenth hole must be thought out given there is a bottleneck of a landing area before the hole turns left and the start of a thee club hill to the green. Not my favourite hole on the course but then again if its good enough for Tom Doak, (who is a big fan of the course), then who am I to argue. As much as the 10th hole divided opinion we were equally in agreement that the par 3 eleventh is a classic. Braid typically desired that holes should be laid out as suggested by the land, well this green fitted perfectly into the Gower sandhills. Tough green to hit given it is only 13yards wide and has a massive false front to-boot. Although we played it on a calm day I would image having the prevailing SW wind on the tail to be helpful when it does blow up from the Bristol Channel. The next stretch of holes offered up a good mix of short and long par MediaDrive Captain, Simon B, contemplating my shot through the Old Church wall on the 7th hole - Pennard - Photo by reviewer 3 and 4’s before the breath-taking par 5 sixteenth. Generous fairway, (I still missed it) and lay-up to wedge distance that again offers multiple ways to play the shot. Seventeen is a double dog-leg that rewards you hitting the fairway by allowing you to go for the green, miss the fairway and it is a three shot par 5.

Eighteen is a difficult fairway to hit but if you do, yes I managed to find one, it will offer up a short iron approach that with the pin up front it was best to fly it on the day before bringing the house down with a birdie for the returning herd of cows from the 1st.

It’s an old school course with rolling fairways and has its little quirks with wired fencing protecting the greens from those cows but it truly is a gem of a course. The par threes are strong with the standout hole being the 11th and still thinking hard to determine if I have every had a friendly welcome to any golf club either side of the Irish sea. Finally a word of advise for anyone with a Garmin Approach S2 in that you best update the latest mapping as I could not get a look in. That said the course planner is value at £5 with tips each hole from the Sean Pearson the resident pro since 2015 and only the fourth pro since the club was founded in 1896.

Like I said a total gem of a course and one I would highly recommend to go play.

M. J. Smyth

May 29, 2018
10 / 10
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M. James Ward

If there's anything in golf more important to achieve it's "fun golf" and you see that dimension front and center when playing at Pennard. The location of the course high on the Gower Peninsula gives the course a geographic location of distinction. The wind can blow violently at times but when the weather cooperates it's hard to take issue with what the course provides time after time.

While a number of so-called "championship" layouts overdose on undue length and inane heights of rough just off the fairways -- at Pennard you get an appropriate test for the masses so that success for different levels of handicaps is clearly present. Mind you -- Pennard doesn't give anything away easily. The demands are there but the degree of the test rests on how bold and how much risk the player wishes to take on throughout the round.

The par-4 7th is certainly a gem of a hole - aptly named "Castle." I especially like the par-4 9th which calls upon two solid strikes to get near the long par-4.

For those who need ideal turf conditions a round at Pennard will be a test of one's patience. Fairway lies can be uneven in terms of overall quality and while the ensemble of different animals roaming the grounds is part of the allure -- it can be a bit much to have the menagerie moving about like a lost episode of Mutual of Omaha's Wild Kingdom with Marlin Perkins.

Pennard excels in having holes that don't repeat what is needed to succeed. Superior design is about adjustments -- not falling into predictable patterns that make a test of golf far less so.

I have always been a firm believer that no less than 60% of any superior golf course is tied to the land the layout occupies. Pennard is a visual treat to the eyes. The land moves in all sorts of directions and when concluding the round it's likely you'll be yearning for another crack at the track.

by M. James Ward

November 27, 2017
8 / 10
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