Shiskine - Ayrshire & Arran - Scotland

Shiskine Golf and Tennis Club,
Shore Road,
Blackwaterfoot,
Isle of Arran,
KA27 8HA,
Scotland


  • +44 (0) 1770 860226

Shiskine Golf and Tennis Club is one of the most unusual courses featured on this website, a links that has attained true cult status. Founded in 1896, originally as a nine-hole layout, Shiskine was designed by the 1883 Open champion Willie Fernie. Shortly before the Great War, Willie Park Junior was commissioned to extend the course to 18 holes and to revise Fernie’s original nine holes. Six of the new holes fell into neglect during World War I, leaving behind today’s unusual 12-hole links.

Shiskine is located at Blackwaterfoot on the western side of the Isle of Arran, a small island off the Ayrshire coast, which is often referred to as “Scotland in Miniature”. This is a simply stunning location, affording majestic views across the Kilbrannan Sound to the Kintyre peninsula.

Nearly every shot at Shiskine is blind, either from the tee or for the approach to the green or, in some cases, both. And because of this tortuous terrain, there are numerous stop/go signals and markers to help golfers navigate their way around the course. The modern school of golf course architecture would cringe at many of Shiskine’s features but the course is a shrine to the way in which the game used to be played by the golfing greats of yesteryear. After all, Shiskine was around long before the earthmovers, irrigators, fertilisers and multi million pound design fees.

Shiskine is golfing ground of such purity, owing only the barest influence to the hand of man, that to play here is to enjoy a unique sporting experience. Shiskine can only be described as idiosyncratic. Nevertheless, it’s fun golf and immensely enjoyable. The 3rd and 4th holes, called “Crows Nest” and “The Shelf”, offer real excitement, nestling underneath the Drumadoon Cliffs. This is a links that needs to be played more than once. Only then will you begin to understand and appreciate its quirks.

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Reviews for Shiskine

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Description: The 12-hole layout at Shiskine Golf & Tennis Club is one of the most unusual courses featured on this website, a links that has reached true cult status. Rating: 6.8 out of 10 Reviews: 13
TaylorMade
Andy Cocker

How much fun can you have on a golf course? Well go play Shiskine Golf and Tennis Club and you'll be grinning from ear to ear for the whole 1 hour 40 minutes it takes to play the 12 holes. And that includes before you've even teed up, as the head greenskeeper (also doubling up as the Isle Of Arran Tourist Board) had us in stitches with his quips and anecdotes, barely a second after stepping out from the pro shop.

Despite the heavy overnight rain, the day was mild and calm and the course open.

I'd seen so many photos of Shiskine, which is why we came over from Ardrossan to Arran to play it, but get your camera ready as you're about to take your own miriad of pictures as photo opportunity galore abounds throughout your round.

This is a true quirky gem of a links course, celebrating its 125th year and probably not looking too disimilar to how it did back then, with minimal earty moving undertaken and even greens situated in natural dells etc.

Short it may be with 7 par 3s in the 12 holes, but the blind tee shots, blind approach shots, hidden dell greens, rolling terrain, not to mention the stunning views make this a course you will never forget and I suspect the backdrop of Drumadoon Point and the Kintyre Penisula across the water, situated behind the green at hole 4 and hole 8 will never be forgotten at all. In fact I'd gonas far as saying that the backdrop is the most visually stunning i have ever seen to a golf hole.

The course delivers, right from the off where you tee off from a bank at an angle to a fairway that runs along the edge of the beach and a blind approach to the green. This hidden green approach is played out on the 2nd (a wee brook is in front of the sunken green) and again on the par 3 3rd, played uphill to a blind green some 50 foot and 127 yards away. A flag system is used to indicate whether the green is cleared or not. The green for hole 3 and tee area for the 4th has been cleverly built into a flat area of the Drumadoon cliffs. The 4th is a downhill par 3, 147 yards and when reaching the green photo opp world opens up for you. I birdied the hole that helos add to the memory. Then onto the next par 3 played out to the The Point with sea right and behind the green. At 244 yards, this is a good par 3 played out in front of you.

Then back into the quirky with a short par 4 at 274 yards, a blind tee shot, severly rolling terrain and a dell green, followed by a 173 yard par 3 played over a hill (called Himalayas) to another hidden green.

After climbing to the 8th tee, waive to the players on the 7th tee to let them know you've cleared the green!

You then play a drivable par 4 back towards Drumadoon Point, before turning and heading back to the clubhouse with a strong par 5. Played blind off the tee, in that you cant quite see the full hole - it dips out of view into a valley and across a brook before climbing to the green - at 509 yards its a reasonable length hole and a good change from the otherwise shorter holes.

The course finishes with 3 par 3s, the 1st played downhill from a high tee, 170 yards to a receptive green. On the greens, some had been cut that morning and they rolled quick and true. The ones which hadnt been cut or rolled ran true but slow.

The the 11th, a blind par 3 of 209 yards. Note - take a look at the dell green to your right as you leave the 1st tee - this is the 11th green. My drive found the green, more luck than judgement but the sense of eager anticipation as you wander up the hill from the tee as to where your ball maybe, to find it on the green...priceless!

The last par 3 is weak in my opinion as a finishing hole, only 126 yards uphill to a blind green. A well struck iron will hopefully find the green, but visually its the only part of the course that undelivered.

I have seen previous reviews say Shiskine is holiday golf. That does it a disservice. This is a classic old school links, it's huge fun, eminently scoreable, but it will punish your errant shots and i suspect if a wind was blowing like it was yesterday, my level par round nay have ended up somewhat different.

Make the journey - not always the easiest when ferries get cancelled and all other times were fully booked, as we found out but i am so glad we persevered. My Scottish trip would have been less without playing this course and enjoying the beautiful scenery that Arran has to offer.

October 28, 2021
7 / 10
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Greg Watson

Amazing views, very quirky in place and despite some overcast weather really enjoyed the course. Definately has that unique feel to it and needs to be played by golf enthusiasts

October 09, 2021
6 / 10
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Tim Elliott

We played Shiskine on a sunny mid-summer’s day with scarcely a puff of wind, conditions nigh perfect for good scoring, which surely is not often the case on this exposed site. The course is perched on the shoreline of the western side of the Isle of Arran, with distant views to the Kintyre Peninsula on the Scottish mainland.

There can be few more magical places in the world to play the game when the conditions are good, we were lucky indeed! The scenery at every turn simply took the breath away.

The 12 holes are an eclectic mix and include 7 par 3s. They vary from the downright quirky such as the aptly named Crow’s Nest third, to some challenging gems with my favourites being the second ’ Twa Burns’ and sixth ‘Shore Hole’’ to the plain beautiful such as the fourth a downhill Par 3 ‘The Shelf’ overlooked by the Drumadoon Cliffs, as pictured from the green.

Shiskine is essentially great fun Holiday golf even if the course was full of walking day-trippers. I can fully understand the cult following that this exhilarating course attracts, yet again demonstrating the huge variety of golfing experiences available at ‘The Home of Golf’.

June 27, 2021
5 / 10
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Gary M

Shiskine is everything great about golf in Scotland. Blind tee shots, silly contraptions to signify when you are all clear to play your tee shot and breathtaking views.

Some would argue it's not worth a 5-ball because it's not even 18 holes. If you make the trip to Arran play Shiskine twice. Once you appreciate the quirkiness of the course you will learn to love it. It's the most fun you'll have on a golf course and compared to the other courses on the island, it's in a different league altogether. The only thing that perhaps lets Shiskine down is after 11 brilliant, breathtaking holes - the 12th is somewhat bland. It's as close to a 6-ball as a non-18 hole golf course can get. Play it.

April 26, 2017
8 / 10
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Ed Battye

Shiskine Golf (& Tennis) Club, set in a truly stunning location at Blackwaterfoot on the Isle of Arran, may only have 12 holes but there is nothing lacking in terms of the enjoyment or test of golf that is presented when playing this wonderfully captivating links.

It’s a course that brings a smile to your face.

In fact writing this review, many days afterwards, I am still grinning from ear to ear at the experience I had there.

I can usually tell how much I like a course by the amount of times that I get my camera out to take photos. At Shiskine it got to the point where it wasn’t worth putting it away.

It’s a true links golf course that has its fair share of quirkiness but also presents a sound and varied test of golf with a number of excellent holes. It’s not championship golf but you must use your imagination to score well.

The course begins with a thrilling opening drive. A sandy beach is hard to your left but it is down this side you must be if you wish to a have a glimpse of the flagstick on a green that is mostly hidden by a large sandhill encroaching from the right. The second is another superb driving hole with an undulating fairway, which houses a centre-line bunker, before once again playing over the crest of a hill to a blind green fronted by a small burn.

Now the real fun begins.

The third, aptly named Crows Nest, is a mere 128 yards but has more going on in its relatively short yardage than in the entirety of some courses. Played steeply uphill you can clearly see a red flag which one initially assumes is the flagstick for the hole, however, by paying attention to a sign on the tee (and the essential yardage booklet) you quickly realise this is simply a signal flag to indicate that the hidden green is clear for play. Remove the flag when you reach the green and replace it when you have putted out. A black and white marker post 50 yards to the right of the red flag is your correct line although the green actually lies somewhere between the two indicators because the slope of the green and its surrounds will feed a ball in from the right. I loved the simplistic strategic nature of this hole where if you bail out too far to the right you face a tricky downhill chip or putt whilst those who dare to go close to the red signal flag, at the risk of a lost ball in the bank of gorse to the left, will have an easier uphill birdie putt.

A visit to Felicity’s, just a few paces from the back of the 12th green, for some food in a relaxed environment is a great way to complete a round at Shiskine which takes no more than a couple of hours.

Ed is the founder of Golf Empire – click the link to read his full review.

Review of the month March 2017

March 16, 2017
4 / 10
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reg atkins
This course is probably the best family golf course in the world. It has everything you could want. Great views, challenging shots, variable winds and different conditions every day, yet you can play in two hours almost guaranteed. I am now 60 and my youngest son first played this as a nine year old yet it was a great equaliser. Make sure you enter a club competition off the white tees to appreciate the full difficulty of this course as well as the attractiveness of the fifth white tee.
October 17, 2009
10 / 10
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Patrick McGarey
I played Shiskine in perfect fall weather in October 2009. Since I had the course to myself on a Sunday morning, it only took 2 hours to complete a "full" 12 holes. Very scenic and roughly half the holes were memorable, notably the blind #3 Crows Nest. A great value and good fun.
October 13, 2009
6 / 10
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Dan Hare
We played Shiskine last week and found it great fun. It was a very windy day, but fortunately the rain clouds that we saw rushing towards us from the Kintyre Peninsula missed us until the last green (ie the 12th !). It goes without saying that if you want to play a modern championship course you should go elsewhere. This is a wild and unspoilt place to play golf, tremendous scenery and very good value. The Crow's Nest and Shelf holes in particular will live long in the memory, but would love to go back.
September 27, 2009
8 / 10
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David Cunningham
What a little gem of a course! I love these old quirky Scottish courses and this is an exemplar - with the exception of the 6th hole which I didn't like, I thought it was great fun. Played the inward half in 21 which is likely to be my lifetime record :-) Highly recommended to all.
July 30, 2007
8 / 10
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Jim McCann

How many courses have you played where the starter gives you an A4 sheet of instructions which guide you, hole by hole, round the course? Well, at Shiskine, this is an invaluable aid to get you round the 12 holes in as few strokes as possible.The terrain dips and rises from the tee at some holes, along the fairway at other holes and before the green at some others!

Jim, our roving reporter, is properly attired for Shiskine

Very much a one off - though there are hints of Prestwick, Machrie and even Oban's Glencruiten throughout - this is essentially holiday golf where you are meant to have fun and enjoy yourself on the golf course.

In fact, if you play here, throw the card away and don't worry about a good medal score as it's not that type of golf you're playing here - how could it be with 7 of the 12 holes par 3's and a total yardage from the white tees of 2996 yards?

I played on a gloriously sunny day with a very light breeze which made conditions for playing as perfect as could be and what a joy it was to don the old plus fours (and bunnet!) and step back to the start of last century when Willie Park tendered to upgrade the course for £600.

And how do I know this? The club have posted his quotation from 1912 along with some other papers in the tearoom at the clubhouse, beside the trophy cabinet - what a marvellous collection of memorabilia!

There are six other courses on Arran, all of which I visited on a one day visit. Some looked grander than others with many having only a tearoom for a clubhouse - how charming is that? I'd love to go back sometime for a few days to play them all as they each look as if they put the fun back into playing golf.

Jim McCann

June 06, 2006
6 / 10
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