Shoreacres - Illinois - USA

Shoreacres,
1601 Shoreacres Rd,
Lake Bluff,
Illinois (IL) 60044,
USA


  • +1 847 234 1472


Shoreacres is located on Chicago’s north shore. Seth Raynor, who built Camargo around the same time before going on to design Yale and Fishers Island, constructed Shoreacres in 1919. Tom Doak's Renaissance Design was involved in course restoration work in 1993, increasing green sizes amongst other modifications.

When you arrive at Shoreacres, you can almost feel a throwback in time to the 1920s as you approach the David Alder clubhouse. The course is unique and challenging with several ravines and creeks that come into play. With narrow tree-lined fairways and large, fast greens which are heavily bunkered, accuracy at Shoreacres is more important than length.

The acclaimed stretch from the 10th to 15th holes is regarded as Raynor’s finest. It begins with a 452-yard version of the Road Hole (complete with out of bounds to the right) and ends with the scenic 521-yard Shoreacres signature hole which requires a bold tee shot which must carry a ravine to have any chance of reaching this par five in two shots. Even then, finding the green isn’t straightforward. Bunkers guard the right and left side of this back to front sloping green. The 15th is not the toughest hole on the course but it’s a supremely strategic example of a short par five.

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Reviews for Shoreacres

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Description: When you arrive at Shoreacres (after your mandatory invite) you can almost feel a throwback in time to the 1920s as you approach the David Alder clubhouse. Rating: 9.6 out of 10 Reviews: 10
TaylorMade
Colin Braithwaite

Shoreacres is awesome and I may be underselling. A Seth Raynor design that goes back 100 years, it is timeless. As you drive in you may be underwhelmed as the course appears to be very flat. Just wait until you end up in one of the omnipresent ravines. While it is located right on lake Michigan, no hole abuts the lake. Additionally, the course usually plays fast and hard and most holes are treelined. You will also notice the exceptionally large greens.

To the course, the first hole is a short straight welcoming par five. The teeth are the two ginormous cross bunkers that start about 220 yards from the green at a 45 degree angle. I put myself behind a tree on the left side and thought I hit a good recovery shot short of the bunkers, but it kept rolling and rolling and rolling. I thought I hot another good recovery shot that would boot scoot onto the green, but it kept rolling and rolling and rolling. This is a perched green that slopes front to back and is hard to hold. The 2nd is a Cape template, short dogleg left with the drive over the ravine and the ravine and brook running down the left side. A high draw off the tee is best. You may want to leave driver in the bag as you can drive thru the fairway into two fairway bunkers on the outside elbow, not to forget the three fairway bunkers and brook on the left. This green tilts hard left and the brook slides inconspicuously greenside left and rear. The best approach is left of middle and aim 5 yards right of the flag. The 3rd is the shortest par 4 and is an example of the Leven template, even though the original is now part of the Lundin Links in Fife, Scotland. Raynor is daring the big boys to go for it. The large forebunker should not come into play whether you lay up or not. The green is protected by front mounding, pot bunker left and bunker long. The green slopes back to front with two tiers and a mound in the middle for good measure. I think it plays easier when the pin is back. Regardless, distance control on the approach is key. Things get tougher on the 4th. OB left and the ravine cuts in front of the fairway and runs down the right side. The good news is I did not hook my drive OB, but ended up in the ravine to set up my first double. The long straight away par 4 5th is the number one handicap hole. OB and fairway bunker left and trees and two fairway bunkers right. To have a chance ate getting home in two your drive should be past the fairway bunkers as the ravine bisects the fairway. If not, it will be prudent to layup short of the ravine. Additionally, it has a two-tier green with a false front. Pars are earned. The 6th is a long par 3 with a Biarritz green. This green is over 50 yards long with a six foot dropping swale in the middle. The hole can play anywhere from 170-230 yards. Two bunkers left and right and one long. When the pin is back, it is one of the most exhilarating shots in golf when your tee shot disappears into the swale and you wait, hope and pray for it to reemerge on the back plateau. My tee shot did not reappear and I consoled myself with the thought that at least I would have a birdie putt. Alas, I had trickled into the 2nd bunker on the right. A playing partner, Owen, chunked his drive and was on the front edge. He hit a super putt that hit the lip and trundled 5-6 by the hole. He then missed the comebacker and tapped in for bogey. I said that was a pretty good 3 putt. Owen responded, “As opposed to my other 3 putts.” This is a design that I wish more architects would incorporate. Fun and a wee bit frustrating hole. The 7th is a long par 4 with the drive over a ravine that also runs down the right side to a double plateau green. Strangely, double plateaus have 3 distinct sections. Here front left is the toughest, back right is the smallest and front right is the easiest. This green is well protected, bunkers right left and back. Pars are earned. The 8th is a mid-length Eden par 3. It has a water carry, but originally was over the ravine. The green is perched with bunkers left and right with a strong slope back to front with a false front. My playing partner, Clay, dumped it in the right bunker to a tight pin and nonchalantly holed it for a surprising birdie. Defintely, the shot of the day. Not wanting to steal his thunder I 3 jacked for bogey. The 9th runs parallel to 18 and shares the fairway and a boatload of bunkers on the right side. Favor the left off the tee, even though there are fairway bunkers left as well. You will have a better angle and shorter approach and hopefully take the right greenside bunkers out of play.

The back starts off with the Road Hole template. Instead of a hotel right there is a ravine. Favor the left off the tee, aim at the water tower. Big hitters can cut some of the corner. The ravine right is not a penurious as some its brethren. While I did not have a great lie, I was able to make solid contact and deposit it in the deep front bunker left. Having been in both Shoreacres and The Old Course, Shoreacres is much easier to get out of. It only took me one hack, whereas last time I played St. Andrews it took me 12. The 11th is a stupendous golf hole. The fairway is a peninsula, off the tee you must carry the ravine which then runs down the right side and juts back in front of the green. Aim at the left side of the green off the tee and consider laying up. Anything right will trickle into the ravine. This green has a false front and slopes right to left. My favorite hole, yep, my only birdie. The 12th is the shortest hole on the course and is called “Short”. It is downhill with bunkers front right and left with a false front. My caddy advised me that the hole played the yardage. I did not believe him, good thing I hot my iron well as it barely stayed on the green. Drives the point home, when you pay a professional you should listen to them. The 13th is another fantastic hole. Slight dogleg left from the ravine. It is a blind tee shot and you may choose to layup. The ravine runs all the way down the left side and overly aggressive drives will the price. You should have an attack iron over the ravine to a green with the most extreme false front on the course. Approaches too long will end up in the back bunker and those to short, well those will be too short. The 14th is the Redan Hole and what a hole. It parallels the Biarritz 6th, but is not as long. Long bunkers flank the green left, back and right. The green slopes right to left but the back third is well above the flattest sections of this green. Probably, the best way to play it is front right of the green or short of the green left. If you have to come in from the right you are pretty much toast and will probably end up in the bunker left. Take solace as the halfway house is only a few yards away. This is one of my favorite redans in the world. The 15th is a dogleg left reachable par 5. It is all about the tee shot, the ravine is on the left off the tee and then dives across the fairway on your second shot. The further left you are off the tee the easier it will be to get home in two. Across the ravine center cross bunkers split the fairway in two. The green is quite large and actually slopes back to front to receive your hero shot. The 16th is a straightaway par four. The tee shot is over the ravine and it then runs down the right side. You will have a long approach is and while running it up is a good option the green is protected with bunkers left and right. The 17th is a short par four that leans left. You drive over the ravine and it then runs down the left side. Your tee shot will slide left so aim further right than you think you should. This hole plays hard and fast, I am not a big hitter and had less than 50 yards in. Before you get too excited this is a tricky well protected green, bunker right and deep bunker left. The front is very narrow and the back has a right and left tier. The home hole is the longest par five and just a reminder it shares fairway and a myriad of bunkers with the 9th. Pay careful attention to the pin location as this will provide a clue as to where you should leave your second shot. If the pin is right go left and vice versa.

This is an amazing course. I am a Shoreacres zealot. If you can get on you gotta go.

October 17, 2020
10 / 10
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Brian LaBardi

To date, this is the best Illinois course I have played. Raynor at his best. While the property is on Lake Michigan, you only have a view from the dining room. None of the holes play along the lake shore. Lots of history here and perhaps the most true to original design Raynor in the country. Original clubhouse burned to the ground in the 80s but was rebuilt in exact form. Raynor template holes abound and the conditioning was second to none. Playing here made me realize how important greens are to a course. That may sound self evident, but these greens are so amazing it crystallizes the issue. Great greens make a great course while bad greens can ruin an otherwise good layout. If the opportunity presents itself, drop everything to play Shoreacres.

September 22, 2019
10 / 10
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Manc Golf

While Chicago Golf Club may be the best course in the area, I would argue that Shoreacres is the most fun to play. The conditioning in recent years has been remarkable with the fairways firm and running and the greens have been firm, fast and true. Love the back 9!

February 05, 2018
10 / 10
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Teddy Keller

Shoreacres is one of my favorite spots on earth. I am lucky enough to get to play it very often, and am never disappointed after a round. It showcases Raynor's best template holes, and I consider it the second best course in Illinois behind another Raynor masterpiece.

It starts off easy, with some short holes, and begins to get hard at the 4th and 5th hole. 6 is a great biarritz, 7 a double plateau, and 8 an eden. The back nine starts off tough with the road hole, and then you go into the ravines. 11 through 15 is the best stretch of holes, as you play over, in, and around these ravines. The short 12th is picturesque, and a favorite of many. 14 is an awesome redan, but always difficult. The par 5 18th is the longest hole on the course, and it gives you a great view of the clubhouse and pro shop.

The history, beauty, architectural genius, and pristine condition all combined make Shoreacres one of the best golf courses I've played, as well as pleasant places I've been. It may not be the hardest course on earth, but the playability makes it so fun, and the firm conditions test you enough.

November 11, 2017
10 / 10
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John Sabino

My experience at Shoreacres was very rewarding. We had an 8am tee time on a lovely summer morning and were the only ones on the course. When I stepped to the first tee to hit my drive, the Star Spangled Banner started playing. I thought they were playing it for me and said, "Hey, this is pretty cool," until my host politely pointed out that it wasn't in my honor but was the daily ritual at the Great Lakes Naval Station, which is located across the street from Shoreacres. The defining characteristic of Shoreacres is the way Raynor routed the course around, over and through the ravines that dominate the landscape. The majority of holes play over a ravine on either the tee shot or the approach shot, sometimes both. The ravines are so prevalent that the scorecard features a local "Ravine Rule," allowing you relief under various penalty strokes if your ball ends up in one. Shoreacres has two of the top ranked holes I have played in all my travels: #11 (carry the massive ravine on your tee shot and to the green and #12 (another classic rendition of a "Short" Raynor hole). In addition to a world-class golf course, Shoreacres also has one of the stand-out clubhouses and there are few places better to enjoy an after round refreshment, sitting up on a bluff overlooking the beautiful and cooling Lake Michigan.

John Sabino is the author of How to Play the World’s Most Exclusive Golf Clubs

November 11, 2016
8 / 10
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Larry Berle

Big greens are a prominent feature of Raynor’s courses; his greens often are square or rectangular in shape and sit on raised plateaus that appear flat, or almost flat, at first glance. Looks, however, are deceiving; the breaks are subtle and can leave your first putts a long way from the hole if you’re not careful. The par-3 6th hole at Shoreacres is a perfect example: Here, the green is more than 200 feet deep (the equivalent of 70 yards, or three-fourths of a football field). There isn’t a field-goal kicker in the NFL who could make a field goal of that length. Depending on pin placement, there could be a five- or a six-club difference in club selection. Big greens are not specific to Shoreacres. At the Raynor-designed Camargo, the practice green was closed, so two practice holes were cut on the back of the 18th green, which didn’t seem to interfere with play in the least.

There are significant elevation changes on Shoreacres, mostly in the form of ravines, with a few on the front nine and several on the back nine. Thank goodness for our great caddie! He knew what club we needed and where to aim every time. Knowing your carry distances is crucial here because the bottom of one of these ravines is not a good place to be. Some of these ravines have mowed, playable areas at the bottom, and one even has a patch mowed to fairway length, but for the most part, if you hit into one, it’s kiss your ball goodbye. If you’ve read Golf in the Kingdom, you’ll know what I mean when I say that some of those ravines on the back nine could be the home of Seamus McDuff.

At Shoreacres, the lake breezes definitely come into play. Oddly, the clubhouse is the only place at the club that is directly exposed to the lake, and you can’t see the lake from anywhere on the golf course. Larry Berle.

December 04, 2014
8 / 10
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Keith Baxter
December 04, 2014
The above review is an edited extract from A Golfer’s Dream, which has been reproduced with the author’s kind permission. A Golfer’s Dream, by Larry Berle, tells the story of how a regular guy conquered America’s Top 100 Golf Courses (following Golf Digest’s 2001/2002 list). Larry has exclusively rated for us every course in the hundred, using our golf ball rating system. However, Larry did not rate the 100 courses against every golf course he has played, but instead he rated them in relation to each other within the hundred. Consequently, in some cases, his rating may seem rather low. A Golfer’s Dream is available in Kindle format and also on Kindle Unlimited via Amazon... click the link for more. 
Nick Mullen

The North Shore of Chicago is home to an area of wealth, luxury and outstanding beauty that would comfortably stand alongside anything any of the other lavish US suburbs have to offer. From Glenview, up towards Northfield, Lake Forest and finally Lake Bluff you are well aware you are in the presence of real money, the homes along places such as Sheridan Rd are mind blowing, the beaches on Lake Michigan Immaculate and the quaint classy little towns a throwback to the good old days. A throwback is definitely a word I would use to describe Shoreacres golf club, for when you drive along the majestic entrance road passing the second green and up to the clubhouse there is a feeling you are stepping back in time. The Clubhouse is a majestic structure, very reminiscent of Somerset Hills, maybe slightly bigger. Snow white wooden structures, with dark green shutters and neatly slated roofs, make up the main clubhouse which sits atop a terrific perch with a resplendent view overlooking Lake Michigan below. Interestingly the locker rooms, pro shop and men’ grill/patio are located in a different building of (equal beauty) 1st tees and 9th and 18th greens around 100 yards from the main clubhouse.

As the name might suggest Shoreacres is located on the shore of the lake, but the view from the clubhouse, is the only closest you will get to it during your day at the club. The course is laid out completely on the inland side of the clubhouse and is as you would expect of Mr Raynor an utterly genius routing. Some of my fellow golfing scribes are extremely critical of Raynor’s prototype approach to golf courses, whereby he attempts to impose certain model holes upon the landscape. At most Raynor courses you will find a certain number of holes in common, namely a short par 3 called “Short”, a hole with a Biarritz green (a large long green with a deep swale in the middle), a Redan hole (stemming from North Berwick’s 15th), a Cape Hole (a dogleg with open trouble all down one side, risk/reward tempting the golfer to bite off as much as he can chew), a Punchbowl (one with a putting surface resembling a punchbowl), Eden (a green modeled on the par 3 11th hole at St Andrews (severely pitched from back to front, guarded by deep bunkers), Alps (a homage to the 17th at Prestwick) and also a Double Plateau green (almost shaped like the letter L). Although not all of these prototype holes are present at all Raynor courses, you will always encounter a number of them. Raynor was a disciple of C.B McDonald, originally an Engineer from Long Island, he worked with McDonald on his layouts, learning from the master, and feeding on the knowledge he picked up while discovering the great Scottish Links. Upon McDonald’s death, Raynor, although not really a golfer turned his hand to design and has gifted us with some of the world’s greatest tracks (Yeamans Hall, Camargo, Fishers Island, Morris County, Shoreacres, The Creek, Chicago Golf Club).

As said above I believe the course created by Raynor, given the land at Shoreacres is remarkable. Although not the largest tract of land for 18 holes, it is the many Ravines which dot the landscape that were his biggest issue to contend with and he encompassed them tremendously into the layout. As a side note there is a local rule at Shoreacres called a ravine rule. If you believe your ball has finished in one of the ravines, you may drop another or replay the previous shot, under one stroke penalty, without having to find the ball. The course opens with a gentle par 5, a chance to get an early birdie on the card. On first glance the only real hazard I felt there was to contend with was a. A 25ft eagle putt did nothing to heighten my fear, however 3 putts later and a nearly broken putter, I was cursing I didn’t heed the advice of everyone I had spoken to of keeping below the hole at Shoreacres. The second sets the trend for most of your round, Raynor approached this place very much from the strategic stand-point, the course is not long (6500 from the back) but you must position your ball in the right spot in order to have a fighting chance of finding the right areas of the dance floor. Try and play this place from the rough and you will be playing a game of golf akin to a dog chasing its tail! This hole has a semi blind tee shot and the fairway turns sharply to the left, if you choose to take a shot on that carries further than past the apex of the dogleg you run the risk of catching the ravine, but are rewarded with a much shorter approach. The green on this hole takes the form of one of my favourite aspects of golf course design, that the normal shot for this instance is not always the best option. The green is defended long and left by a drain and by sand right. Due to you only having a short iron in, you almost feel obliged to get the ball high and airborne, however as at many of Raynor’s courses, the green is open in front and invites a shot played along the ground, no doubt a quality he picked up from old C.B’s knowledge of the links game. The second is one of my favourite holes anywhere!

From here the golf course heads out and skirts the edge of the property before turning back towards the clubhouse. The two par 3’s, 6 and 8 are great examples of different, but nonetheless great par 3’s. I have not played Yale yet but the 6th is definitely my favourite Biarritz hole, the green is 88 yards from front to back and the swale in the center of the green is incredibly deep, a great old school hole design that not many would even dream of nowadays. The 8th is a superb uphill par 3, with again a devilishly placed back to front sloping green, on the day we played the pin was in the easier back right location, I can only imaging the heartbreak stories of anywhere near the front. The par 4 fifth hole most definitely presents the toughest test on the front side. The ravine crosses the fairway at roughly 290 yards and must be avoided at all costs. From this point you are faced with a medium iron to a beautiful but lethal Raynor green. Played a pitch from the left hand side and turned away assuming it to be a pretty good shot, however my playing partner’s silence as if could the side of the middle tier and rolled tantilisingly onwards made me look rather clumsy. The 9th is a shirt par 4,where you can really give the driver a rip, as long as you miss the fairway traps, a birdie is a genuine possibility.

After 9 holes, unless you have been asleep and irreverent of how the course should be played, your score should be respectable. But what the course gives away with the front 9, one must be prepared for what it nastily takes away on the back. Although number 5 is the Index 1, in my opinion the tenth is definitely the most difficult hole on the golf course. The hole doglegs to the right, with a large old oak tree standing guard down the left side, the fairway falls sharply off from the right hand side and there is not much room left before the out of bounds. The tee shot is not terrifying but not exactly comfortable either. However it is the second shot which I feel challenges the resolve of the player most. Raynor modeled this green on the 17th at St Andrews and although it is not as elevated or severe, it is an equally stiff test. The front hole location leaves very little margin for error, while back left is most interesting requiring a soft landing shot to carry the trap and hold the green at the same time. The 11th is the second leg of Shoreacres amen corner. Voted one of the world’s 500 greatest golf holes, with the ravine having to be carried on both the drive and second shot, like the trend at Shoreacres, not a long hole, it was only a 4 iron and a gap wedge for me from the back tee, but it can catch out even the most talented player if he becomes lazy. The 12th exemplifies the genius of Raynor and s testament to the Engineer in him, getting the most out of his site. The location of the green in a natural valley is akin to anything Colt did in any of his work on the Surrey sandbelt, it sits well below the level of the tee and plays only 127 yards, surrounded by scrub and sand. Once down on the putting surface here, you sit stand in almost complete seclusion, with the only sounds you hear coming from the nearby navy base, which break up the silence with their chanting (something I quite enjoyed). As you play your tee shot on number 13 and rise out of the valley you embark on most the most enjoyable finishes to a golf course, this author has ever had the pleasure to experience. They somehow encompass all the aspects of all the holes that have gone before them. Birdie chances are available but double bogies are also not out of the question. The 14th is a semi Redan hole, with a bank on the right that the local golfer will use to his advantage to help work the ball towards the middle of the green. 15th is a par 5 with second shot having to carry the ravine, nowadays it is more the length of a long par 4, so birdie is most certainly an option! The 16th is a nice par 4, with the multiple teeing options vastly differing the shape of the hole, while the green contains the customary subtle Shoreacres hazards. While the short par 4 17th, with its risk/reward factor may well be my favourite hole on the golf course, beware the back left pin…it’s one for all the suckers out there! As my followers on this site will know I am a huge fan of finishing holes which offer the player a chance to pick up a stroke, the 18th t Shoreacres does this, bending to the left and running parallel to the entrance drive back towards the beautiful clubhouse with the waters of the Lake Michigan in full view behind.

Shoreacres is a tremendous golf experience, exclusively private but at the same time intimately personable and extremely welcoming to guests. The whole air and atmosphere of the place is something I really found very unique, almost a middle ground between our pure golf back in GB& I and the traditional US country club, a nice medium! I couldn’t help but draw a comparison to Somerset Hills, which although is a Tillinghast, reminded me very much of each other. The golf course is spectacular and in my opinion worthy of a place year in year out in any top 100 of the world list, it dwarfs some of its high profile, big membership north east clubs and is so much tasteful/real golfing experience than some of the newer additions to our list. As noted above I am a huge fan of Seth Raynor and this is one of his best. A club I would happily be a member of and play at the rest of my life and deserves much more of the acclaim it already receives.

P.S Shoreacres may have one of the nicest halfway houses anywhere; the Chicken Salad Sandwiches with the crusts cut off are amazing!

July 15, 2011
10 / 10
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jud tigerman
Probably the most fun you'll have on a golf course in the metropolitan Chicago area. Classic old gem on a unique piece of property that plays firm and fast. Perhaps a bit short for very strong players, and the driving range is a bit of a joke, but don't let that keep you from experiencing this beauty if you get the chance. I actually holed out for my first eagle on the famed #11!!
May 16, 2009
10 / 10
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David Davis

I had the unique opportunity to play this beautiful course in July. What surprised me was that upon arrival the golf staff basically came running to my car to greet me, they knew my name before I opened my mouth and served my every wish...ha ha. It wasn't a surprise that on this perfect day, our 4 ball didn't run into one other golfer on the course. After all the course only has 125 members. Not sure how these places remain in existence really. Full staff everywhere just serving us, even at the halfway house. The course... sure it's perfect, but it's the entire experience that's totally special. If you get the chance, take it.

September 24, 2008
10 / 10
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Tim Browne
Put this course on your list of courses that you must play before you die. Arriving here is like stepping back in time and the finest traditions of golf are maintained here. The course architect, Seth Raynor, learnt the trade under Charles Blair Macdonald and has designed some truly memorable golf courses. Here there are deep ravines that you have to play over or alongside and these create some very interesting shots but my memory of my round here is of one interesting hole following another. The shapes of holes and shots demanded vary enormously. The 2nd hole dog legs left with a stream and the entrance driveway on your left the whole way. The 6th is a long par 3 with a huge basin in the centre of the green like the 15th at North Berwick. The 11th challenges you to drive left of the ravine and then carry it with your approach to the green. The 12th is a beautiful short par 3 played from a high tee. There are 18 interesting holes here, a golfer's treat.
August 09, 2006
10 / 10
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Jud T
May 16, 2009
Agree completely. This is a fabulous course on a stunning piece of property. Probably the most consistently fun round of golf in the greater Chicago area. And I holed out on the famous number 11 for my first eagle last summer as well!!