Oakmont - Pennsylvania - USA

Oakmont Country Club,
1233 Hulton Rd,
Oakmont,
Pennsylvania (PA) 15139,
USA


  • +1 412 828 4653

  • Adam Pletcher

  • Henry and William Fownes

  • Devin Gee


Apart from Augusta National, Oakmont Country Club has hosted more major Championships than any other course in the U.S. and it’s considered by many to be the toughest golf course in the world.

Oakmont is hidden away in the Pennsylvanian hills near Pittsburgh and steel magnate Henry C. Fownes fathered Oakmont in 1903. His son William, former U.S. Amateur Champion, continued his father’s work for an entire lifetime. The result can be summed up in three words, greens and bunkers. The greens at Oakmont are lightning fast and the bunkering is penal, epitomised by the famous “Church Pews” bunker which catches errant drives at the 3rd and 4th holes. Rumour has it that the greens were actually slowed down ahead of a national championship… they really are that fast.

“From its very beginnings, when the par for the course was set at 80,” wrote Mike Stachura in American Classic Courses, “Oakmont Country Club has made no apologies and taken no prisoners. It prides itself on being a brutal test of golf from green to tee, seemingly laughing full-throated at the visiting golfer like an evil genie. It was, according to 1927 U.S. Open winner Tommy armour, “a cruel and treacherous playground.” It still is. Par may no longer be 80 at Oakmont, but it sure feels like it.”

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Description: Apart from Augusta National, Oakmont Country Club has hosted more major Championships than any other course in the U.S. and it’s considered by many to be the toughest golf course in the world. Rating: 9.3 out of 10 Reviews: 11
TaylorMade
Javier Pintos

Oakmont came to my mind early in 1994, when I saw images of Arnie’s last US Open then won by Ernie on that 100C temperatures playoff against Loren Roberts and Colin Montgomerie. And it then become my dream course to play when on a sunny afternoon at the 19th Hole at Dye Fore in Dominican Republic we watched Angel Cabrera taking Tiger and Furyk to win the first of his two Major Championships (well, really three as he won the European PGA at Wentworth which I believe should be one as well) in an epic battle where the course really bit the entire field.

It could have happened before but Oakmont Golf Course - Photo by reviewer I had to wait 12 years upto May this year, when I was blessed to enjoy 2 days there and I couldn’t have asked for a better experience. Well, maybe avoiding the 2 Thunderstorm Suspensions we had on Sunday which made me barely make it on time for my plane back home!

The invite came both ways by Members I hosted in Argentina in early March and as I had a scheduled trip to USA during May, the chance was there and all I had to to was extend 2 days the trip. And it was this Member and former Club President who helped me to play Fox Chapel … it would have been a great mistake not to play it, Seth Raynor is the absolute truth in golf course design.

The experience, because it was not only the 2 rounds, started arriving to the Club on Friday afternoon after playing Fox Chapel and enjoying the Club entrance, the Club House, some images of the course and sitting on a table with many members during the SWAT (you need to read and learn what that is) that was opening the Season. It was a first glance and all I wanted was to hit the driver on 1st hole!

During his visit in March, Chick gave a very valuable gift: Oakmon’ts History in one book and it was great to do the Homework and ready it carefully before the trip. It helped me to understand many things, be aware of others and get to know the detailed history of this National Landmark. Strongly recomended! And what also made it great was Chick hosting me at his home, getting to meet his family and be treated like a son. Can’t be more grateful for those 2 days.

Saturday started with the star of the trip, The Club House Tour, where Chick shows and explains every detail, how memorabilia is distributed, why those pictures were the selected and then walking every corner of it, absolutely awesome. You can see replicas of the first rakes (I handled one and it weights a ton!), pictures of every Open including one of Montgomery in dark clothes sweating like a roasted chicken, the cigarette tops smoked by Angel Cabrera during his final round, replica trophies of every Open with the winning score, the story about the courtesy paths from tees to fairways is fantastic: When Hogan played his first round in the mist he came with his trousers totally soaked without missing a fairway and it was then when the paths were cut for the following round!

Around 11:30am and after Oakmont Golf Course - Photo by reviewer 30mins of green practice where the stroke seemed to be there we teed off our 5 Man Team playing the SWAT!! We had good chances of winning but we ended with a even par score losing 10 ways. My play was poor and disapointing, I was as nervous as on a Club Championship Final and although I really enjoyed it very much, I can’t remember one single shot hit well apart from a couple of tee shots and the 4 iron on 16th. And I putted as a monkey, not only not making the makable ones but also not being able to get it close from 30 feet. As embarrassing as you can imagine, adding a 45º shank on 2nd hole from 60yds! After the round we enjoyed lunch at the Club and then back to Chick’s home for a fantastic meal and some more stories about the Course.

Sunday was so different … was paired with two young members in their low 30s, very good golfers and the game just flowed a lot better. Many good shots, some putts made and a totally different sensation! And with that I left the Club back to Buenos Aires, feeling it is tough but in a good day you can score, but you have to be extremely sharp.

It is fair to clarify that I played 2 different courses: Saturday was firm and very fast, with greens rolling faster than 2007 US Open final round but a big rain that night made it softer and a little bit “easier” on Sunday. For example on 1st Hole on Saturday, with a 9 iron you had to land it 20 yds short from the green if you wanted to hold it there …

One more thing to point is the course has many things similar to Carnoustie, same concept, some holes are very similar to those in Scotland and the toughness can be matched by both of them in Championship conditions. And when you play it, as it happens with Augusta National (not played it but been there many times), the change levels are huge and you don’t see them on TV.

Some shots/holes to be pointed:

- 1st hole plays very similar to Carnoustie, especially 2nd shot downhill.

- 3rd is so up the hill the second shot!! On one of my rounds my ball landed just short of the pin and came 20yds off the green. And I visited the Oakmont Golf Course - Photo by reviewer Church Pews on 4th, being able to get it away pretty good!

- 8th is not only long but so tough, even from 225yds.

- 9th is very upstairs! When you see where Cabrera put his drive on Friday you understand how far they can hit it.

- 11th another one where from the tee you see how the level goes up.

- 15th … That 9 iron from Cabrera! On Saturday to hold it you needed to land it way short of the green.

- 17th is extremely tough, from the tee you see nothing but bunkers and the Flag standing there lonely.

- 18th green is diabolical, even 2 great shots on Sunday were not enough.

Another of the features shown by Chick is all the long holes are downhill and the short ones uphill so there you admire the design and the balance the Course has.

It was great, a dream come true and the chance of being challenged to the highest level by a course that could host the US Open tomorrow if needed! It is that special, that great and so good! No words will be enough to describe what Oakmont does to you in a couple of days, you need to experience it.

June 26, 2019
10 / 10
Oakmont
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M. James Ward

Since the 1978 PGA Championship I have had the good fortune in having attended all the key national championships played at this tour de force course.

In my mind, the US Open has four iconic layouts which should be hosting America's national championship of golf -- the US Open each ten years. Oakmont, along with Shinnecock Hills and Pebble Beach and Pinehurst #2, are all stellar and all for various reasons due to the nature of their designs. A planned record 10th US Open will be contested in 2025.

Oakmont has always been about a penal style of architecture -- the Fownes were not interested in treating half-hearted shots with anything other than tough love. And I emphasize the word "tough" more than "love." But the aspect that elevates Oakmont beyond the torture chamber reputation is the pedigree of the winners who have been able to climb the Mount Everest in golf in America. With the exception of Sam Parks, Jr. in 1935 -- the winners of the various US Opens played at the Pittsburgh area club have been certifiable Hall-of-Famers. In many ways, Oakmont rivals that of Muirfield in being able to identify those with the most consummate of golf skills.

The most noted dimension that caused Oakmont to really excel is the vast tree removal program that started in the last 20 years which has faithfully restored the "look and "feel" originally intended. Over the course of time the character of Oakmont was mindlessly cluttered with trees to the point of suffocation.

The desire to restore that dimension took courage from key members and staff because the "tree constituency" which existed there and at just about any club. The tree hugger fan club has failed to realize the impact what a vast number of trees can do the architecture and turf quality.

While many people often overdose the discussion on the penal aspects of the course -- the more important storyline deals with the wide variety of holes encountered and the manner by which the putting surfaces are equally diverse and always ready to strike fear among players. Oakmont prides itself on the speed of its greens and woe the player who doesn't hit consistent approach shots with that in mind.

Fall away greens at the 1st, 10th, 12th and 15th holes are all examples of this type. Any approach shot that fails to get beyond the hole runs the risk in being severely dealt with via a punishing fall away pitch shot that even the likes of Seve Ballesteros in his prime would be most fortunate to escape with par.

The combination holes -- both short and long -- and the manner by which they are inserted into the routing brings to the forefront the fullest range of shotmaking prowess. Power is needed at Oakmont but power without sound execution is meaningless here.

The architecture of Oakmont doesn't allow luck to be rewarded over the long haul as happens at other courses. You can't simply chip and putt your way around Oakmont. Getting off the tee soundly and in concert with total command of one's approaches is rigorously examined.

Oakmont is fair in its examination because superior play has been rewarded over the course of its existence. The most noted being the long time "low" final round of 63 by champion Johnny Miller in the final round of the '73 US Open. Some have ignorantly claimed a night's rainfall prior to the 4th round allowed Miller to shot his stellar score. But, that belies what others in the field could not do with similar conditions. The final 36-holes played by the '83 winner Larry Nelson is no less sensational. The diminutive professional from Georgia fired rounds of 65 and 67 to pass the likes of defending champion Tom Watson. Nelson's 132 total remains the lowest final two rounds of scoring in US Open history. Miller's round has since been bested in major championship play but the 63 the Californian fired still remains for many the most note 18-hole round in golf and much of that is tied to where that round was played -- Oakmont.

How would the Fownes react to the only course that father and son created? That's hard to say with certainty. Name a top ten in all of golf -- and Oakmont is rightly there. The detailing with so many superlative dimensions is the storyline of Oakmont. You have a fascinating penultimate hole where driving of the green is most certainly a considered risk. Beyond the infamous "Church Pew" bunkers which separate the 3rd from the 4th holes -- there is the deadly "Big Mouth" bunker that guards the right front of the 17th. But, no round can be said to be "final" till the home hole is played. The long par-4 18th is a grand concluding hole. The tee shot is put to the ultimate test and the approach must be no less equal to the task. The green features a series of internal "waves" that can carry away any timid or half-hearted putt.

If Oakmont was a movie character the course would be golf's Darth Vader. Be forewarned -- the Force had better be with you.

by M. James Ward

April 16, 2018
10 / 10
Oakmont
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Kevin McLaughlin

I had the privilege of playing Oakmont in the beginning of October and it lived up to its billing of being a world class course and test in golf. As this was my first time I cannot contrast what the experience was prior to the removal of the vast amount of trees bringing it back to the look of the original design by Henry C. Fownes, but I was struck multiple times during my round by the tremendous sight lines through out the round.

OCC certainly lived up to its reputation of being a brutal test of golf. While much is made about the speed of the greens (and rightfully so), I found the most challenging aspect of the course for me was the fairway bunkers. It seemed as though I would hit well struck drives that would end up rolling into well placed bunkers lining the fairway. With the majority of the fairway bunkers being very deep, I was forced to take me medicine and play a lofted wedge back to the fairway without advancing the ball too far. However, the difficulty did not dampened the round and I thoroughly enjoyed my round. The hospitality of the staff from the guard house, bag drop, locker room attendant, pro shop, caddie, to lunch server was top notch and made for a warm environment that left the mark that in addition to the fine championship course, the rich history, that the club operations and staff are top notch.

Oakmont easily jumped into contention as a personal favorite with some of the top courses that I've been fortunate to play in U.S. and abroad; hoping to have the pleasure to be back in 2018.

November 14, 2017
10 / 10
Oakmont
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michael nowacki

Clearly one of the best courses in the world and a course that needs little description because most golf course lovers are familiar. The one downside to the course is that it is not a lot of fun for high handicaps due to the challenging tee shots and greens. Single-digit handicaps enjoy the test.

June 23, 2017
10 / 10
Oakmont
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John Sabino

Both Johnny Miller and Ernie Els call the first hole the hardest opening hole in championship golf and it's hard to disagree. Along the right-hand side is O.B. the entire length of the hole. If you don't hit the ball far enough on your tee shot, you have a blind downhill shot to the green. The green slopes right to left and back to front and is lightning quick. Many golf course architects believe in a moderately easy hole to open with and then the course gets progressively more difficult. The father and son designers of the course, the Fownes', did not share this philosophy. Their design philosophy of, "A shot poorly played should be a shot irrevocably lost", was executed with precision when they designed Oakmont.

There is no letup from the first tee to the eighteenth green. Every hole at Oakmont is hard and the greens are all as fast as any course in the world. Oakmont is essentially in U.S. Open condition all the time and it proves a difficult test of golf. I just don’t have the shot to play a 288-yard par three. I love the history of the club and the historic clubhouse. Oakmont is worth visiting, just bring you’re A+ game. It is the hardest golf course I have ever played.

John Sabino is the author of How to Play the World’s Most Exclusive Golf Clubs

November 24, 2016
8 / 10
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Steve MacQuarrie

With our national championship on tap at Oakmont, I thought a review would be timely.

The first time put I ever had there was a 15 footer that broke 8 feet………….and that was in October when the greens hadn’t even been cut that day. Right then I knew I was in for a special experience………and I was not disappointed. While the course is accurately viewed as difficult, I found a number of mitigating factors. Fairway landing areas are generous, though there is usually a better side of the fairway to approach from. And only a few greens—generally on the shortest holes--are completely surrounded by bunkers. So unlike other difficult courses (Seminole, Winged Foot West and Oakland Hills South are among those that come quickly to mind) playing a running approach is quite feasible—or even preferable—in many cases. I’ve a double digit handicap, and breaking 90 has not been a problem whenever I played.

The fabled tree removal—the project that got the trend started in the 90s—makes for striking views in all directions. Seventeen flagsticks are visible from the massive front porch of the clubhouse. And while the Pennsylvania Turnpike does bisect the course, it’s far enough below grade as to be not at all intrusive.

The greens are as difficult as advertised. Sam Snead once claimed that “I went to mark my ball, but the coin slid off .” But there are antidotes to the ubiquitous back to front slope found on more conventional courses, a four of them (1, 3, 10 and 12) fall away from the golfer. Others are sloped severely left or right, requiring some thought on the approach. And there are lots of undulations, many severe, though some, e.g. the 3rd and 8th, are more subtle. Over 200 bunkers add to the challenge, even without the furrows that were present for many years.

I have yet to play Cypress or Pine Valley, but until I do—and maybe even after—this is my favorite golf course in the U.S.

June 14, 2016
10 / 10
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Larry Berle

I played Oakmont to complete the Top 100, but I have no desire to go back. I can’t understand why anyone other than the best of golfers who really enjoy being tested would want to join Oakmont. In my opinion, this collection of 18 holes is more like a penal colony than a golf course.

Oakmont was founded and designed in 1903 by Henry Fownes and his son William. Their goal was to build the most difficult golf course possible, and they succeeded. After the course was built, the Fownes boys would watch golfers play the course, and whenever they saw a player hit over a fairway bunker or hit a poor shot that went unpunished, they would instruct the greens keeper to excavate another bunker. At one time they had directed the installation of more than 350 bunkers. The Fownes’ design philosophy was that “a shot poorly played should be a shot irrevocably lost.” The golf world should be damn glad that this was the only course they designed. Larry Berle.

October 17, 2014
4 / 10
Oakmont
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Keith Baxter
October 17, 2014
The above review is an edited extract from A Golfer’s Dream, which has been reproduced with the author’s kind permission. A Golfer’s Dream, by Larry Berle, tells the story of how a regular guy conquered America’s Top 100 Golf Courses (following Golf Digest’s 2001/2002 list). Larry has exclusively rated for us every course in the hundred, using our golf ball rating system. However, Larry did not rate the 100 courses against every golf course he has played, but instead he rated them in relation to each other within the hundred. Consequently, in some cases, his rating may seem rather low. A Golfer’s Dream is available in Kindle format and also on Kindle Unlimited via Amazon... click the link for more. 
Steve Eggleston
I had the opportunity to play this course right at the end of the season in 2008. Despite horizontal torrential rain, this was a magnificent golfing experience. From the moment you walk into the club everything oozes class and privilege, but despite the slightly awkward moral questions posed by being forced to take caddies who carried two bags each everything felt right about this place and it is clearly the course that is the master and the members are merely custodians. Walking through the clubhouse has a similar feel to taking a tour of Fenway Park or Lords. You are on hallowed ground and at every corner is a reminder of great players and their deeds. Playing the course (particularly in the conditions we had) is a humbling experience. Even soaking wet the greens were very fast and the mind boggles at how hard this course must be when it is set up for US Open conditions. The undulations and changes in elevation around the course are huge and the risk-reward options on nearly every shot make the mental challenge a key part as well. Some of the bunkering is knee trembling stuff as you try to work out a safe way to negotiate the hole! I have never been so wet in my life, and yet I enjoyed every minute - a lifelong memory and an ambition fulfilled!
March 13, 2013
10 / 10
Oakmont
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JBM
Have been fortunate to play Oakmont in 2008 and then again in September 2012. Believe all the tales about the greens 'cos they are true ! In 2008 the greens were running at 13 -14 on the stimpmeter and they wanted to get them to15 for a members' competition the next day.....yikes. It is a tough, unforgiving course presented immaculately.Even the short par fours....like 17....are so well bunkered and the green is tiny. Like the course, the clubhouse is SUPERB and is a delight to walk thro' and eat and drink in. One of THE VERY BEST.
November 14, 2012
10 / 10
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John
Truly world class. Think of the quickest greens you have putted on and then add some! The presentation of the course, the quality of the clubhouse, the excellent cottages all add up to make it a fantastic experience. The caddies were very knowledgable and without them I would have struggled on the greens. Only area I would say could improve would be the locker room. Not a lot of atmosphere and pretty dark!
October 24, 2009
10 / 10
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Rob G
August 14, 2010
Oakmont is amazing, only walked it never played it, but I was a caddy as a kid on Oakland Hills (the monster) and learned the hard way to approach Donald Ross greens. To think Johnny Miller nailed a 63 on a final of the US open here is beyond comprehension.
Joel E
October 17, 2011
Oakmont lives up to its rating. I liked the locker rooms with all the spike marks on the benches. You feel the history of the place as you tie up your shoes.