Presidio - California - USA

Presidio Golf Course,
300 Finley Road,
Arguello Gate,
San Francisco,
California (CA) 94129,
USA


  • +1 415 561 4661

  • Golf Club Website

  • 2 miles S of the Golden Gate Bridge, San Francisco

  • Welcome, contact in advance

  • Don Chelemedos

  • Robert Wood Johnstone and William McEwan

  • Rob Dugan


The Presidio Golf Course dates back more than 100 years and Robert Johnstone designed it, returning with William McEwan a few years later to remodel it. Set close to downtown San Francisco, it’s a popular facility that winds over hilly ground between stately pines and eucalyptus.

Tom Doak made a point of playing Presidio in 2016 and awarded the course a rating of four out of ten. He commented as follows in his Christmas 2017 Confidential Guide update:

“Fortified by the Spanish in 1776 to defend the harbor of San Francisco Bay, The Presidio was a prestigious U.S. Army posting from 1848 to 1994, when the base was closed and installed into the National Park System. A civilian club shared the course [and the upkeep] with the Army for many years; the club still operates but the course is open to the public now. It’s very steep in several spots, and some new bunkering is so tight to the fronts of greens that it demands several unreasonable approaches. But, along with Wawona in Yosemite, that makes two golf courses within the borders of a U.S. National Park!”

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Reviews for Presidio

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Description: Set close to downtown San Francisco, the Presido Golf Course dates back more than 100 years. It’s a popular facility that winds over hilly ground between stately pines and eucalyptus. Rating: 6.8 out of 10 Reviews: 4
TaylorMade
Brian Moran

I’m sorry to sound like a spoiled snob, but I had little to no expectations going into Presidio having played Cypress the day before and preparing to play Cal Club the next day. That being said, I’m kicking myself for not having done more research, as the course was truly stunning.

To combat the preconceived notion you may have of me after my introductory sentence, I will share one of the worst claims my ears have ever heard. Once on a course in Florida I was paired with a bag tag Barry from the Phoenix area. When speaking about a trip I was preparing for in the coming months to Arizona I had mentioned a desire to stop by Papago, where one of my friends plays at Arizona State. He cringed, saying, “I would stay away from there, it’s a muni”.

Such an assumption is a common one in golf, and using the term “muni” in a derogatory sense is putting fuel on the fire of the elitist stereotypes our game faces. Having such an attitude would prevent you from seeing hidden gems such as Pacific Grove in Monterey, George Wright in Boston, Mount Prospect in Chicago, or my personal favorite, Buffalo Dunes in the small town of Garden City, KS. It would also keep you from seeing the gem of Presidio, once the home of the San Francisco Golf Club and one of the few sites in America to see the work of Herbert Fowler and Tom Simpson.

Upon stepping up to the fifteenth tee and looking out over the San Francisco grid (one may argue it’s a better view than the sixth at Cal Club), you can understand why Presidio is so underrated. The landforms here are absolutely nuts. The 6400 yard tips on the scorecard are a red herring as there’s no shot that plays level throughout the day. The greens are spectacularly interesting and the recently revamped bunkering may struggle to grow grass around, but are truly a present to the eye. The framing of massive trees along fairways give a pure taste of Northern California and shape the holes well.

Presidio is beloved by locals for all the right reasons. Only my legs would tire of playing here every day, as the greens always keep you on your feet, and the recent addition of golden age bunkering adds strategy to a potentially weaker routing. This is easily the best muni which San Fran has to offer, however, most tourists pass on it to play Harding Park. This is a mistake, as Harding Park sits on bland land with a bland design. You can find that anywhere, Presidio is where you come to find true San Francisco. The quirk, the nature, the San Franfreakos, all of which roam in spades at Presidio.

September 15, 2022
7 / 10
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Bill Vostniak
September 17, 2022

Really think about it - is Presidio as good or better than Olympic? Forget tournaments ...

Donald Hudspeth

Along with Harding Park, a great alternative if you don't have any connections to get on the private courses in the City. Small greens and Eucalyptus tree lined fairways make a rather tough track.

September 25, 2020
6 / 10
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Steve MacQuarrie

Presidio is not far from San Francisco’s Palace of Fine Arts. But William Gladstone Merchant and Bernard Maybeck’s striking building is not the only artwork in the neighborhood. Presidio’s bunkers were artfully designed by the firm of Suny Zokol (and shaped, in most cases, by course superintendent Brian Nettz). They have a classic ragged look, accentuated by fescue-like wisps on the edges. At 6481 yards from the longest tees, the course needs some defense and much of that defense is provided by sand.

Though Presidio’s bunkers are indeed, things of beauty, they are challenging and best avoided. Some have claimed that even Harry Houdini would have trouble making an escape from some. While I acknowledge such an argument, its proponents need to understand that there’s no rule that says a bunker escape must be made by striking the ball toward the green. And, of course, strategic thinking about one’s approach shot may dictate that such bunkers are best be avoided at all costs—even if that means directing a shot to the edge—or even off—of the green.

The course dates to 1895 but the current routing is likely the 1921 work of Herbert Fowler—designer of such gems as Eastward Ho!, Walton Heath and Cruden Bay—and his student, Tom Simpson. The course is laid out over typically hilly San Francisco land. Fortunately the uphill holes are short (averaging 362 yards for the par 4s from the back tees). The two longest par 4s average 436 but each benefits from a severely downhill tee shot.

Presidio is an enjoyable course and easily the finest located in an American national park. (This is damning with faint praise as the only other one I’m aware of, Yosemite’s Wawona course, is as close to a bad golf course as there is. My definition of a bad course is rather liberal: It’s one where you’d prefer to be at work than playing.)

November 28, 2019
6 / 10
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Steven Deist

Pair this course with Harding Park and San Francisco has two great old historic public offerings that in my opinion both fly under the radar. Presidio even more so than Harding Park. I feel like nobody ever mentions this course and its just kind of considered the old muni in San Fran (which it is), but it's still a must play. From the hilly terrain to the old clubhouse to the above average condition of the course, Presidio offers a great deal that is ignored by many. As a midwest guy, the holes lined with the Eucalyptus trees offered a unique feel and beautiful framing. I'd advise anyone going to the bay area to make a stop by Presido. It's a fantastic old golf course.

May 11, 2019
8 / 10
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