Top 100 Architects

Top 100 Golf Courses - Top 100 Architects

Brian Silva

Brian Silva joined Geoff Cornish and his partner Bill Robinson in 1983 and he remained with the company until 2000, when he left to establish his own design practice.

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John Abercromby

John Abercromby joined forces with Herbert Fowler, Tom Simpson and Arthur Croome; most of “Aber's” work was in collaboration with Fowler around the sandy heathlands of London.

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C. K. Cotton

Cotton didn't take up golf course architecture until the end of WWII when well over 50. In between times he taught as a schoolmaster before drifting into the role of secretary at Parkstone and Stoke Poges.

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C. K. Hutchison

Hutchison served as assistant to James Braid during the construction of Gleneagles and the reconstruction of Carnoustie. In the mid-1920s he formed a firm with Colonel S.V. Hotchkin.

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Mike Strantz

In 1979 Tom Fazio recognized Mike Strantz's talents and offered him a position with his firm, resulting in Mike spending most of the next eight years on the road, fashioning layouts in the Carolinas and Florida.

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Robbie Robinson

Robinson served as construction manager for Stanley Thompson at Sunningdale CC then stayed on to serve as club superintendent until 1936, when he re-joined Thompson to work on Highlands Links.

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Perry Dye

Perry Dye, Pete and Alice Dye's oldest son, was literally born into golf course architecture. As a teenager he helped Jack Nicklaus and his father route the South course at John's Island, Florida.

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Charles Redhead

It has been claimed that by 1937, there were not more than four courses of note in the whole of New Zealand that had not been remodelled or bunkered by Charles Redhead.

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Ron Kirby

In 1963, Kirby became a design associate with Robert Trent Jones, assisting with a number of projects in the US, Europe and the Caribbean. After eight years with the company, he branched out on his own.

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Allan Robertson

Allan Robertson was generally thought to have been the greatest player of his day. He was certainly, if unofficially, the first greenkeeper and golf course designer in history as well as the first golf professional.

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