Top 100 Architects

Top 100 Golf Courses - Top 100 Architects

Ernie Els

​Ernie Els grew up on the outskirts of Johannesburg, where he excelled at cricket, rugby and tennis. His prowess at tennis was such that he won the Eastern Transvaal Junior Championships aged thirteen.

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Schmidt & Curley

Schmidt-Curley Design has worked quite a bit in the United States and the neighbouring countries of Canada and Mexico but the vast majority of its output has occurred in China and other Asian countries.

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Ron Fream

Ron Fream's botanical talents were spotted by the Robert Trent Jones design company in 1966 and he was hired, as he says himself, because he “knew how to grow grass”.

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Peter Matkovich

Matkovich learned how to play golf at Shabani (which was owned by the local mine company) and progressed to play many courses around the country, most of which were developed by mining firms.

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Nick Faldo

​Nick Faldo didn’t start playing golf until he reached the age of 14 and it’s said he only got into the game after watching Charles Coody win the 1971 Masters tournament on his family’s new colour TV set.

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Mike DeVries

Mike DeVries apprenticed with golf architect Tom Doak for a couple of years before going on to the University of Michigan to complete his Masters in Landscape Architecture in 1994.

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Graham Marsh

​Graham Marsh, nicknamed “Swampy,” was a fine cricketer as a young man and he trained as a maths teacher at Claremont Teachers College after graduating from the University of Western Australia.

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Nelson & Haworth

At the start of the new millennium, Robin Nelson, Neil Haworth and Brett Mogg acquired the Belt Collins interest in the design firm that then became Nelson & Haworth.

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Guy Campbell

​Sir Guy Campbell was the great grandson of Robert Chambers, the early British golf historian and co-designer of Royal Liverpool's original 9-hole course at Hoylake.

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Alice Dye

Alice Dye was the USA’s "First Lady" of golf architecture. She designed some of the country's best courses, won more than 50 amateur golf titles, and became the first female member of the ASGCA.

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