Portmarnock (Championship) - Dublin - Ireland

Portmarnock Golf Club,
Portmarnock,
County Dublin,
Ireland


  • +353 1 846 2968

  • Andrew Whitelaw

  • William Pickeman, George Ross, Mungo Park, George Coburn, Martin Hawtree

  • Francis Howley


Portmarnock Golf Club is situated on its own sandy peninsula, approximately two miles long and covering some 500 acres. In 1893, William Pickeman, a Scottish insurance broker, and his friend George Ross, rowed across the sea from Sutton to the peninsular and immediately realised that this was prime golfing terrain. In those days, the peninsula could only be safely reached by boat.

The land belonged to the famous distiller, John Jameson, and from around 1850, the links was used as the Jameson’s private golf course. Nine “proper” holes opened for play in 1894, Scotsman Mungo Park (winner of the 1874 Open Championship at Musselburgh Old course) directed the course design and became Portmarnock’s first professional. Two years later another Scot, George Coburn, extended the course to eighteen holes. Pickeman was the driving force behind Portmarnock’s beginnings and went on to design other courses in Ireland.

There is nothing man-made about Portmarnock; it’s a natural links, and considered to be a very fair golf course. With water on three sides, the course is at the mercy of the wind. Laid out broadly in two loops of nine holes, you are invariably playing in different directions. Measuring just less than 7,500 yards from the back tees, it is a formidable test of golf. You will need your very best putting game because the greens at Portmarnock are lightning fast and true. Or in the words of Bernard Darwin: “Perhaps the outstanding beauty of Portmarnock lies in its putting greens. They are good and true, which is a merit given to many greens, and they are very fast without being untrue, which is given only to a few, and is a rare and shining virtue”.

There are delightful views to the south of the Ireland’s Eye (a small island), home to important seabird colonies and the Hill of Howth (once famous for its electric trams). On a clear day looking northwest, the Mountains of Mourne are visible.

Portmarnock has hosted a number of important events including—on 19 occasions—the Irish Open, the Canada Cup and the Walker Cup. The closing five holes are especially brutal. Bernard Darwin once commented: ”I know of no greater finish in the world than that of the last five holes at Portmarnock”. The first of these closing holes, the 14th, requires an accurate approach shot to a narrow green, or in Joe Carr’s case, an accurate drive. Apparently Carr, an amateur, made a hole-in-one on this 385-yard par 4. How on earth did he miss those greenside bunkers?

The par three 15th, measuring 190 yards from the medal tee, plays along the seashore. Any hint of a left to right shaped tee shot will almost certainly end up on the beach, whilst the green is protected at the front by three fearsome bunkers. Ian Woosnam almost came a cropper on this hole in the second round of the 1988 Irish Open. His opening tee shot ended up in the sea, but playing three off the tee, he somehow managed to find the edge of the green and then he holed a 40-footer for a bogey. Clearly inspired by this miraculous save, Woosnam went on to win the title.

A third (Yellow) nine was added in 1971, designed by Fred Hawtree and costing a very modest £3,500. The only change required to the Championship layout (Red and Blue nines) was a new fairway and green for the 6th hole.

Fred’s son Martin was commissioned to upgrade the course prior to the 2003 Irish Open and this involved reconfiguring the 1st hole (with fairway and green moved to the right), constructing a new par three 12th, installing new greenside runoffs on five holes and new tees on three other holes.

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Reviews for Portmarnock (Championship)

Average Reviewers Score:
Description: ”I know of no greater finish in the world than that of the last five holes at Portmarnock Golf Club”, said Bernard Darwin Rating: 8.5 out of 10 Reviews: 53
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Gary GALBRAITH

Played it a couple of weeks ago. Absolutely outstanding condition from tee to green and tough but really fair test even if (like me) you're at best a pretty ordinary player.

The staff were superb, too.

September 07, 2021
10 / 10
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Ralph Wardlaw

My one abiding memory of Portmarnock was walking off the 14th tee, thinking to myself, “this is a hell of a golf course, up there with the best I’ve played” and then laughing to myself as I stepped out onto the 15th tee and realising it was even better than I just thought.

For me, Portmarnock has pretty much everything I want in a course.

The setup the day I played it was perfect. Fairways a decent width, rough that was playable and you would almost always find your ball, but with no guarantee of a good lie. If you did find the rough then it would take a really special shot to hit and hold those incredibly firm greens. For me this makes the course playable for high handicappers as well as challenging for the better players.

I also found it to be a really clever course. On holes like 8&9 there is a bit of a bailout off the tee. But if you end up in it you leave yourself a dreadful angle for your approach shot. Good, clever design.

Like others have said it is also a fair course. Only 1 blind shot and fairly flat fairways where you don’t get much in the way of bad bounces.

It was a fantastic experience and I can’t wait to go back. It really is up there with the best of the best

September 05, 2021
10 / 10
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Colin Braithwaite

What can i possibly say that has not been said? A wonderful course near a great city. Does not get much better than that. As several mentioned it is on a peninsula, thus, I would recommend later AM or afternoon tee times as it can be quite foggy in the morning. As it is slightly above sea level, some may say it lacks the sizzle of Old Head, but it is a non-fabricated test of golf.

I highly recommend it.

August 26, 2021
8 / 10
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Fergal O'Leary

Portmarnock GC – often referred to as the great example of links golf in Ireland. No two consecutive holes run in the same direction, and the low sand dunes guarantee the wind will be a constant battle. There is nothing to protect you from the natural elements that embrace the peninsula which has facilitated golf since 1894. Conditioning at Portmarnock has never been better, and the head greenkeeper is fanatical about the smallest of details, especially the presentation of immaculate putting surfaces where wind is always a factor. Steep-faced bunkers and arguably the best finishing stretch in GB&I, place Portmarnock towards the top of the list when it comes to the best links in the game.

June 26, 2021
9 / 10
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Cathal Devlin

A fantastic routing is at the heart of Portmarnock’s charm. The championship 18 possesses a superb set of par 3’s along with high number of quality par 4’s. 1, 4, 5, 8, 11, 14, 17 & 18 are outstanding.

February 19, 2021
9 / 10
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Thomas Turner

Superb course and more so than other courses in the Top 50, it can be enjoyed by players at higher handicaps. The cliche is that the course is the fairest links in the world and I can see why people say that - at least psychologically there seem to be fewer bad breaks. It has a very traditional and historical feel, but I found it decidely friendly and not stuffy in any way. Because its the home course of UCD and post graduation, students can remain members for quite a low cost, it always seems to have young players around which is nice. Conveniently to Dublin and I think a must for golf trips in that area.

May 21, 2020
8 / 10
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J Graham

Could not have enjoyed ourselves more. The course and surroundings are dripping in history and patina. Staff was very accommodating and the overall experience was as good as it gets. Make time to play this course.

January 22, 2020
10 / 10
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Patrick Desmond

It is with good reason that this course is always in the top three in Ireland >> an absolute pleasure to play as it is all laid out in front of you - visible fairways large greens and a great challenge from start to finish. Playability is a key word, while the holes point to all parts of the compass you need to be alert on windy days. Many elevated greens where the poorly executed shot will be repelled but not into unplayable jungle grass - the run-offs are fair where I just enjoyed getting up and down so often. (Note: Ken Brown one putted 8 of the last 9 nine greens to win the Irish Open in 1978)-- you can too!!! There are many memorable holes viz., 13th to 16th particularly the par three 15th ‘Redan’ design which will test the golfer. No towering dunes but scenic in its own way. Played it loads and never tire of it 9.8/10 pd.

January 14, 2020
10 / 10
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Peter Wood

Unlike many other Irish Links, Portmarnock winds through relatively low lying dunesland, making it an easy walk. The course is renowned as being 'the fairest links course in the world'.

It was Nick Faldo who observed, "the course has a gentle opening and gradually builds to a great crescendo".

One of the great strengths of the design is that the course is laid out in two loops of nine holes so that each hole is on a different angle and subject to wind from a slightly different direction.

The greens at Portmarnock are also regarded as some of the best anywhere, both fast and true.

Portmarnock GC has a rich history of championship golf, and is a tremendous test of links golf for all standard of golfer. Not to be missed!

Peter Wood is the founder of The Travelling Golfer – click the link to read his full review.

December 16, 2019
8 / 10
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Mark White

If the R&A wants to host the Open Championship at a golf course in Ireland, then Portmarnock should be the first choice. It has length, a routing somewhat equal to Muirfield’s in that the course moves often in a different direction, well placed bunkers, a good clubhouse, room for spectators, a course subject to wind conditions, fast greens and many excellent golf holes. They could also grow the rough high enough to make it truly penal. It would, however, still likely need to strengthen the finishing holes.

The first two times I played Portmarnock I did not agree with the esteemed Bernard Darwin regarding the final five holes at Portmarnock. Other than 15, I did not believe they had enough “drama” and strategy to them. At the time the yardages were 376, 174, 528, 432, and 376. Now the yardages are 394, 203, 575, 480 and 453. Technology has meant the first three play roughly the same; the real improvement has been made to the final two holes.

I do love the routing at Portmarnock. There were obvious options for this really good, “secluded” piece of land and the architects could have built the course in more traditional layouts of holes running parallel to each other. Instead they built a course moving in all directions with holes 1-3, 12 and 13, and finally 17 and 18 going the same direction. All of the other holes either reverse course or go off at an angle to the previous hole. It is a clever routing and one that should be praised because it could have been done very differently.

Along with Chicago Golf Club, Portmarnock is often mentioned as the best course built on flat land. It is certainly as flat as Chicago or Metropolitan in the sandbelt of Austrlaia. Wind from the Irish Sea and Dublin Bay are nearly a constant factor here, so much that if you were to play here on a day when the wind was not blowing, you might miss out on one of the primary defenses of the golf course. For me, that is the difference that puts Chicago GC ahead of Portmarnock for “best flat course.” In the absence of wind, Chicago GC offers a more challenging layout with an even better variety of holes and far superior green complexes. I put Portmarnock ahead of Metropolitan although Metropolitan has superior green complexes due to the bunkering going right to the edges of the greens.

I find it harder to remember the holes at Portmarnock even though I have played it multiple times. I think that is a function of being on flat land where there are less memorable features surrounding the holes, the lack of elevated tees, water, not many high dunes, etc. In this regard, one wonders if Pormarnock would have been better served when first built with the use shovels to manufacture dunes to create some elevated greens such as the par 3’s at Muirfield or even a blind tee shot such as the eleventh at Muirfield.

I have never played Portmarnock well but that does not influence my assessment of it. I have about 200 golf courses I want to play, of which seven are in Ireland. Maybe on my next visit I make sure I add Portmarnock in order to possibly repair my reputation on it. In a “normal” wind I do not think Portmarnock to be overly difficult if one chooses the right tees and can stay out of the rough, but I have only played it in an above average wind of 20 mph with gusts above that. I am often in the rough there even if only a few yards off the fairway and I find the rough to be more difficult here than at many other links courses.

My American friends, some of whom are scratch, that I have referred to play Portmarnock think highly of it, but they find it less memorable than the other “name” courses in Ireland and Northern Ireland, and locally they preferred The Island and County Louth.

Looking at the other reviews it appears only a few reviewers through the years have not given it a high review. I do not understand the person who gave it a rating of two. I cannot see a rating lower than 4.5 and wonder if “cost or difficulty” played a part in their rating. It looks as though conditioning has been a common issue through the years and that is a fair comment for a rating. Additionally, the comments from some reviewers regarding not having many (or any) memorable holes I understand given my earlier comment about the flatness of the course. Many of the fairways lack the undulations, valleys, or ripples so prevalent throughout the courses in Ireland and the UK.

The starting hole is memorable only due to the Irish sea down the entire right side. There are three bunkers left on the par 4 fairway to catch the person who plays away from the water as well as three bunkers short of the green. The green is disappointingly flat and its only characteristic is its size.

The second is a par 4 slightly dogleg left with a narrower fairway than the first. It is well bunkered near the green with seven bunkers including a large one fronting the green forcing you to fly the approach shot into the green even though it is set back far enough that you could land a ball just over it. The green is nicely two tiered.

The third is a severe dogleg left with tidal waters/beach on the right side and slightly raised mounds down the left side of the fairway. Another large bunker fronts the green but is well short of it. There are three bunkers near the green.

The fourth hole is a longer par 4 that is nicely defended with nine bunkers beginning halfway down the fairway and continuing to the front of the green. The green sits slightly back to the left with some grass protecting the left side. It is a very good golf hole.

The fifth should be a memorable hole for this par 4 that when I first played it was 363 yards and now is 444. There is a blind tee shot down one of the few areas on the course where there are some mounds. The fairway on the other side of the mounds feels like it is in a bit of a hollow leading to a kidney shaped green. There are two bunkers on the right front of the green to be avoided. One can use the mound to the right of the green to push a ball back onto the green.

Another blind drive follows on the longest hole on the course. This hole seems to go forever as you play towards the Irish sea after completing another blind tee shot. It is a slightly uphill green, but not enough to add an additional club. Wind is the key variable on this golf hole because it can take a ball over the mounds near the green.

The par 3 seventh and par 4 dogleg left eighth are not memorable golf holes for me. They are solid holes but not special.

The ninth is a nice par 4 heading back to the clubhouse with a more undulating green.

The tenth is a short par 4 dogleg right that has a lovely elevated green with fall offs on all sides. For me, this is the best green to this point in the golf course.

The tee shot on the longer par 4 eleventh threads some bushes to this green guarded by some small pot bunkers. It is a well-designed hole but with another disappointing green.

The stretch of holes from twelve through sixteen are very good.

The twelfth is a medium length to short par 3 playing back to the Irish Sea. It is a fine hole, much better than the seventh. There is a good amount of slope to the green from right to left and back to front.

The long par 5 thirteenth has sixteen bunkers on it. They are small and seemingly are everywhere, on the tee shot, on the approach shot, by the green.

The fourteenth is a medium length dogleg left par 4 with a rolling fairway and a green tucked into the small mounds. It is a good green with undulations, sloped back to front. Pot bunkers guard the front and right side. This is a very good golf hole due to the green.

The fifteenth is considered to be one of the finest par 3’s in the world. It certainly has the length from the “elevated” back tee at 203 yards. The taller grass, beach and sea are hard on the right side. The green is raised and fronted by three bunkers. It is a good hole, but I actually do not think it is in the discussion of one of the best par 3’s in the world.

Ten bunkers await on the long par 5 with three of them being cross bunkers that should not come into play. It has a relatively small green for the length of the hole and the three pot bunkers right of the green and the single one to the left provide adequate defense. This is another very good golf hole.

The seventeenth, once 376 yards and now 480, has eleven bunkers. It is a very good golf hole not so much due to the added length but due to the placement of the bunkers. Hard to believe this hole was once a short par 5.

The concluding hole is a nice long par 4 with the green situated in a bank of smaller sand dunes. Three bunkers guard the right side of the fairway for the tee shot while three bunkers guard the front of the green.

As mentioned, I think this is a course suited to host “big” tournaments. I certainly wish the Ryder Cup had been held here as opposed to the K Club. I can’t speak to Adare Manor as I have yet to play it although I know the conditioning there and obviously the accommodations are first class. This course is one of the better links courses one will play even if due to the flat land and relative flatness of the greens every hole might not stick in one’s memory. It is worth playing more than once and as many as ten times. It is a very good golf course for its members.

November 20, 2019
8 / 10
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Kevin Hanrahan
November 22, 2019

R&A to host the Open Championship in Ireland? Are you serious? Do you realize that you are speaking about a separate and independent country that is not part of Britain? Do you really think that Ireland would host the British Open? Wow. Maybe Mexico can host the US Open?

Top 100 Admin
November 23, 2019

“The Open” is NOT the “British Open”. This famous and eldest golf championship is regularly and incorrectly labelled the “British Open”. The major championship’s correct name is simply “The Open”.

Royal Portrush, in Northern Ireland, hosted a wonderful Open earlier this year. Northern Ireland is one of four sovereign UK countries (United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland).

If the R&A decided to host The Open in the Republic of Ireland, Portmarnock would certainly be a marvellous choice.

Mark White
November 23, 2019

Kevin, I lived in the UK just outside of London for five years and still make two trips a year to the UK/Ireland. I know and have played with a fair amount of R&A members, including a few on the competition/tournament committee. I am well aware that it is an extremely unlikely scenario that an Open would be staged in Ireland, One reason alone is the many number of great courses in the UK. I would state that Portmarnock is definitely the equal of a couple of courses currently staging The Open such as Royal Liverpool.

I made the comment as a "wouldn't it be interesting if...." but also because I believe Portmarnock Championship is at the level where it could.

As for Mexico hosting the US Open, it does not have a course even close to being worthy of it. Diamante Dunes is the best Mexico has to offer and despite it being a top 100 course per Golf Magazine, no way would it challenge the world's best players. The USA has hundreds of golf courses that could host a US Open. In addition, much like the Olympics in Brazil that kept many of the top pros from competing, Mexico has a much more serious issue with player and fan safety that is getting worse by the day.

If Scotland were to vote to be separate from the UK, what might that mean for future Open locations? Would they be held only in Scotland (maybe we would see The Open at Royal Dornoch?) or would they move around. The last vote was somewhat close and as Boomers pass away, the younger generation in Scotland appears to want a connection to the EU.....

But one never knows. The past is not always a good indicator of where golf will go if it wants to continue to grow.

Jim McCann
November 23, 2019

Is nobody aware that Portmarnock hosted the R&A's Amateur Championship this year?

BB
November 24, 2019

Taking the Amateur championship to Portmarnock this year does at least show that the R&A are not against taking their tournaments outside of the UK. However, this doesn’t set any precedent because it has taken place at Portmarnock before. And we are talking about The Open - which is on another planet to its amateur equivalent. Returning to Mark’s original hypothetical point though, Portmarnock is an excellent course, one of my absolute favourites, and it could provide a worthy test if it were ever to host The Open